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The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment

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We live our lives in a discontented world and it is all too easy for the Christian to share its spirit. This book remedies this spiritual disease in practical biblical ways.


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We live our lives in a discontented world and it is all too easy for the Christian to share its spirit. This book remedies this spiritual disease in practical biblical ways.

30 review for The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    In typical puritan style, not for the faint of heart. When you get to the point that you are done with pop-christianity and McChristian books, look no farther than this book for weighty, spiritual depth and life-changing principles. Read slowly in order to digest everything. It is packed full of sound principles; not to be skimmed in a day. But worth all the effort.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hemmeke

    This series of sermons by the Puritan Burroughs is a rare jewel of solid counsel and instruction for those battling discontent in their souls. Discontent is all around us. We vent it in coffee shops to friends. Ads for the next cool thing cultivate it for us. In one of the most prosperous societies ever, discontent rages. Contentment is an inward, quiet submission of the heart, which takes pleasure in God's providence in every situation. So says Burroughs. Many have contentment who don't have much This series of sermons by the Puritan Burroughs is a rare jewel of solid counsel and instruction for those battling discontent in their souls. Discontent is all around us. We vent it in coffee shops to friends. Ads for the next cool thing cultivate it for us. In one of the most prosperous societies ever, discontent rages. Contentment is an inward, quiet submission of the heart, which takes pleasure in God's providence in every situation. So says Burroughs. Many have contentment who don't have much, and many who have much are discontent. No amount of money, power, friendships, or sensational experiences can satisfy the heart of man. But to be content with your situation glorifies God, keeps you from sin, makes you Christ-like, is part of the Spirit's fruit, and brings much reward. Murmuring and complaining is the opposite, and we see it a lot in Scripture, especially Numbers. It is wicked rebellion, though we downplay our own discontent all the time. WE always have a reason, it seems. Why not consider all the reasons to be thankful, instead? There are lots more of those! How can we complain when God has given us far better than we deserve? I especially enjoyed chapter 11, against the excuses for our discontent. If you only knew what I'm going through! It's too severe. I didn't expect it. It's worse than others face. I could handle something else, but not this. Burroughs deals with each of these well. Please read this chapter, if you say these things to yourself. A note on the style: yes, Puritans can be long-winded and difficult reading. It is worth the effort. Do something a little harder than usual, and see the reward it brings! He uses lots of real life illustrations, too, that help.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    2020: Always timely. 2019: So good. 2018: Challenging and comforting. So much yet to be learned. 2016: So much wisdom here. I pray I will be a good student and learn my lessons well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Weber

    One of my friends encouraged me to read this book in preparation for a talk I was asked to give on the topic of contentment. She even let me borrow her copy so that I could read it! Mr. Burroughs first published the book in 1648, and it is loaded with wonderful insights, vivid analogies, helpful explanations, and practical applications. One of the most striking explanations that I gleaned from the book is that most Christians don’t handle affliction or loss with contentment because they don’t ex One of my friends encouraged me to read this book in preparation for a talk I was asked to give on the topic of contentment. She even let me borrow her copy so that I could read it! Mr. Burroughs first published the book in 1648, and it is loaded with wonderful insights, vivid analogies, helpful explanations, and practical applications. One of the most striking explanations that I gleaned from the book is that most Christians don’t handle affliction or loss with contentment because they don’t expect to encounter such adverse experiences. This is contrary to the teaching of Scripture and the example Paul sets for us of anticipating “bonds and affliction” in every city to which he traveled (Acts 20:22-23). Mr. Burroughs expounds on this and many other truths much more thoroughly than a brief review allows. I gleaned much from this book, especially in light of the personal experience God took me through to teach me the secret of contentment.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jon Pentecost

    Incredibly good. 10/5 stars. Read during Covid lockdown, which was a very timely season to reflect on contentment. This is a book full of good, gentle, gracious heart surgery that commends the goodness of Christ in the gospel. Recommend to anyone breathing

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Quite simply one of the best books I have ever read! Every Christian in America needs to read this book. We complain and complain, or as Burroughs says, "Murmur, Murmur, Murmur..." No matter our circumstance, the current economic problems, or whatever, we find our contentment in Christ and Christ alone. Please, people who read this, read this book and be changed. Thanks be to God that in His providence He raised up men like Burroughs to write things like this. Soli Deo Gloria!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Abby Jones

    The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (A short review) By Jeremiah Burroughs I started reading this book, providentially, at the same time I faced chronic health issues that sapped my energy and forced me to be house bound and mostly couch bound. What a blessing from the Lord! This book challenged me to keep my heart in the right place, trust the Lord, and seek the spiritual growth that comes from affliction. This is an excellent, easy-to-read, manual for every believer on the importance of conte The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment (A short review) By Jeremiah Burroughs I started reading this book, providentially, at the same time I faced chronic health issues that sapped my energy and forced me to be house bound and mostly couch bound. What a blessing from the Lord! This book challenged me to keep my heart in the right place, trust the Lord, and seek the spiritual growth that comes from affliction. This is an excellent, easy-to-read, manual for every believer on the importance of contentment and keeping a pre-ash, treasure in heaven mentality. He covers health issues, money issues, and many many heart issues poking in deep to help you root out a complaining heart. This book isn’t without a small handful of doctrinal issues. At one point Burroughs declares that God is more interested in your private bible study than He is with your church attendance. There aren’t so many that value can’t be gleaned, but don’t read this book blindly. Keep your theology cap firmly in place. I can see myself reading this book again, or referencing particular parts of it during times of struggle. God has taken care of His church through good times and bad, down through the ages, by giving us pastors and teachers. We are fortunate to get to read the shepherds of the past.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    An excellent book and one I wish I owned a copy of to refer when I find myself lacking...the jewel of Christian contentment. There were a few points I disagreed with... For men, to whom God has given gifts of wisdom, when things fall out amiss in their families, to be always murmuring and repining, is a greater sin than for women or children to do it. There's some old-fashioned 17th century misogyny for you. :P Or... For instance, God takes away a child and you are inordinately sorrowful, beyond w An excellent book and one I wish I owned a copy of to refer when I find myself lacking...the jewel of Christian contentment. There were a few points I disagreed with... For men, to whom God has given gifts of wisdom, when things fall out amiss in their families, to be always murmuring and repining, is a greater sin than for women or children to do it. There's some old-fashioned 17th century misogyny for you. :P Or... For instance, God takes away a child and you are inordinately sorrowful, beyond what God allows in a natural or Christian way; now though I never knew before how your heart was towards the child, yet when I see this, though you are a mere stranger to me, I may without breach of charity conclude that your heart was immoderately set upon your child or husband, or upon any other comfort that I see you grieving for when God has taken it away. Talk about a "breach of charity". In conclusion-- while it wasn't a breeze to get through and I didn't agree with about 5 percent of it-- I think I have benefited by reading it and can even see myself recommending it to others.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Prata

    It's hard to know how to review such a phenomenal book. Full of wisdom, well written, and convicting. Burroughs gives the reader higher visions of Jesus and sets the reader into place and position compared to Him, and allows us to clearly see what a sin discontent is. You might think that's a downer, but any book that raises our estimation of Jesus is worth it. Burroughs shows us how very MUCH we have in Christ. Contentment is a jewel because Jesus is the jewel that bestows it- if we cultivate i It's hard to know how to review such a phenomenal book. Full of wisdom, well written, and convicting. Burroughs gives the reader higher visions of Jesus and sets the reader into place and position compared to Him, and allows us to clearly see what a sin discontent is. You might think that's a downer, but any book that raises our estimation of Jesus is worth it. Burroughs shows us how very MUCH we have in Christ. Contentment is a jewel because Jesus is the jewel that bestows it- if we cultivate it. The Puritan Paperback has streamlined the language lightly but it is still a book that demands attention I didn't want to miss out on so many jewels and nuggets of wisdom, so I read one chapter a day or two. Leave space in your mind for ruminating. And don't miss out on reading this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bob O'bannon

    When I read the Puritans, I sometimes wonder why I read anything else. This book is a 228-page treatment of Paul's declaration that he had learned to be content in every circumstance. Burroughs analyzes the subject of contentment from about every imaginable angle, and shows a timeless acquaintance with the workings of the human heart. Put asunder any fear that this 17th work will be hard to understand --it is plain spoken, practical and profound.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Brown

    I feel as if I have only scratched the surface of this book. I will be re-reading it for many, many years to come.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Randall Hartman

    This exposition of Philippians 4:11 by Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs defines Christian contentment as "that sweet, inward quiet gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God's wise and fatherly disposal in every condition." It is a heart condition that is so opposite that of 21st century culture, which has ingrained me and so many others with serial discontent. Burroughs notes that being well-skilled in the mystery of Christian contentment is the duty, glory, and excellence This exposition of Philippians 4:11 by Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs defines Christian contentment as "that sweet, inward quiet gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God's wise and fatherly disposal in every condition." It is a heart condition that is so opposite that of 21st century culture, which has ingrained me and so many others with serial discontent. Burroughs notes that being well-skilled in the mystery of Christian contentment is the duty, glory, and excellence of a Christian. The book describes the source and characteristics of contentment, unfolds its mystery, and notes that we learn it in the School of Christ. The author then articulates both the excellence of contentment and the evils, aggravations, and excuses of its opposite, a murmuring spirit. He concludes his scripture-drenched book with considerations to content the heart and directions for attaining the grace of contentment. Lest one think this is a list of to-dos, it is focused on considering what God in Christ has done. I highly recommend this jewel as a devotional reference as well as a challenge to our world-oriented perspective.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I have finished - if by finished you mean I will go back to the beginning and start it again. This is a cheese grader of the soul. Or maybe just a chisel to chip of those bits that have grown on to me in my sin. We now own it on audiobook as well.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bambi Moore

    Full of delicious truths. A balm to the soul!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Fendrich

    Much like the other writings of the English puritans, this one is a loving, compassionate, humble punch in the face. ;) It’s a classic of Christian literature for a reason: Bible-centered, pride-crushing, and sanctification-empowering. Will need to read again and again.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    I debated between 4 or 5 stars. It's an excellent book, makes you realize how great God is & how small we are in comparison. It's not an easy read & takes time to sort through all of his thoughts. Can get a bit dull at times, but Burroughs gives numerous examples of excellent points he has. Highly recommend for those not only struggling in contentment, but for those looking for a book to challenge their worldview. I debated between 4 or 5 stars. It's an excellent book, makes you realize how great God is & how small we are in comparison. It's not an easy read & takes time to sort through all of his thoughts. Can get a bit dull at times, but Burroughs gives numerous examples of excellent points he has. Highly recommend for those not only struggling in contentment, but for those looking for a book to challenge their worldview.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This was the first book I read aloud for my podcast, Hurry Up and Read. It is a fantastic look at true Christian contentment, how to attain it, and how to avoid discontent and murmuring. It is filled with analysis on reasons people give for discontent, and I found many of them convicting. Overall, this book motivated me greatly to pursue true Christian contentment in my own life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    I wish I could give this book more than 5 stars! If there is a more needed message to our culture today than the lesson of Christian contentment, I don't know what it is! And if anyone could more thoroughly and biblically teach it than Jeremiah Burroughs here does, I don't know who he is!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joostnixon

    So helpful in getting control of the attitude. Can be a bit wordy (he was a Puritan after all(, but really quite good.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Floyd

    This is my second time through The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment, and I think I will reread this book until I die. It is one of the best books I have ever read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

    One might think that contentment is a contemporary issue, but Jeremiah Burroughs’s admonitions in The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment remind us that humans have struggled with contentment since Adam and Eve. To be content is what God calls us to and is what distinguishes us as those who have experienced the transforming work of God in our lives. Burroughs says that, “Christian contentment is the duty, glory, and excellence of every Christian.” What is contentment? Burroughs suggests that con One might think that contentment is a contemporary issue, but Jeremiah Burroughs’s admonitions in The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment remind us that humans have struggled with contentment since Adam and Eve. To be content is what God calls us to and is what distinguishes us as those who have experienced the transforming work of God in our lives. Burroughs says that, “Christian contentment is the duty, glory, and excellence of every Christian.” What is contentment? Burroughs suggests that contentment can be defined as, “…that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God’s wise and fatherly disposal in every condition.” Reflecting on Paul’s words to the Philippian church, Burroughs tells us that when we are able to see things as God sees them, we can shift our perspective from not only seeing a few good things that we have been given, but to realize, that God has given us all that we need. In his words, “… a Christian should say, I have not only enough, but I have all.” It is no small thing to be able to shift our perspective to see the world this way. It requires a radical “heart-work.” When our hearts begin to be transformed by God, we not only require less to be satisfied, but the very things that satisfy the world are things that do not satisfy us. In God economy, Burroughs suggests, we come to contentment not by addition, but by subtraction. Burroughs says: “You do not find one godly man who came out of an affliction worse than when he went into it; though for a while he was shaken, yet men, you find, have been worse for their prosperity.” Instead, we begin to see all we have through God’s eyes. What is it that we have received that we ought to be content in? Burroughs reflects: “If God has glory, I have glory; God’s glory is my glory, and therefore God’s will is mine; if God has riches, then I have riches; if God is magnified, then I am magnified; if God is satisfied, then I am satisfied; God’s wisdom and holiness is mine, and therefore his will must needs be mine, and my will must needs be his.” When we have this perspective, we see how much we have and not how much we lack. We consider the sufferings of Christ and wonder why we should suffer so little. In Burroughs words, “Thus, a godly man wonders at his cross that it is not more, a wicked man wonders his cross is so much.” When our hearts respond to God with contentment, he is glorified and filled with joy. But, when our hearts are ungrateful and discontent, we grieve God. Reflecting on God’s harsh response to discontentment, Burroughs says, “To murmur when we enjoy an abundance of mercy; the greater and the more abundant the mercy that we enjoy, the greater and the viler is the sin of murmuring.” Or, more simply put: “Nothing is more grievous to the heart of God than the abuse of mercy.” Burroughs The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment is indeed a timeless jewel. It’s remarkable to consider how much more the poorest contemporary reader of Burroughs book has compared to the richest reader when it was first published. It reminds us how universal the problem is. Burroughs book is well worth the read. It calls us to the heart of God and in doing so convicts powerfully. The pace of the book is tough for the contemporary reader, myself included, and not necessarily linear in its organization. Burroughs circles the topic more than moves through the reader toward a destination. And the practical applications are less clear than his statement of the problem. One final quibble I would have with Burroughs is that, at times, he can overstate our depravity for effect (at one point he calls us “pitchers of poison”). That said, I commend The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment to the patient reader who desires to have his or her heart better reflect our holy and loving God’s heart.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eliezer Salazar

    You can almost hear Burroughs speaking to you as a father or grandfather in the faith, comforting you, rebuking you, challenging you, embracing you, encouraging you, reminding you, and going to great lengths with such simplicity to unfold the art of Christian contentment. Just like a rare jewel must be worked hard for, so it is with contentment. To be a Christian is to be one that must learn contentment. I wish I had read this book when I first became a Christian. If you are a Christian, let thi You can almost hear Burroughs speaking to you as a father or grandfather in the faith, comforting you, rebuking you, challenging you, embracing you, encouraging you, reminding you, and going to great lengths with such simplicity to unfold the art of Christian contentment. Just like a rare jewel must be worked hard for, so it is with contentment. To be a Christian is to be one that must learn contentment. I wish I had read this book when I first became a Christian. If you are a Christian, let this be your thought continually when you come to a trial/difficulty/affliction: I am not in hell. Jesus is mine. It is well with my soul. If you are reading this review, you must put all other books aside and read this book. Have your family and church members read it. "Many Christians who have an interest in the things of Heaven converse but very little with them; their meditations are not much upon heavenly things. Some give this as the reason why Adam did not see his nakedness, they think that he had so much converse with God and with things above sense, that he did not so much mind or think of what nakedness was. Whether that were so or not I will not say, but this I say, and am certain of, the reason why we are so troubled with our nakedness, with any wants that we have, is because we converse so little with God, so little with spiritual things; conversing with spiritual things would lift us above the things of the world. Those who are bitten or struck by a snake, it is because they tread on the ground; if they could be lifted up above the earth they need never fear being stung by the snakes which are crawling underneath. So I may compare the sinful distemper of murmuring, and the temptations and evils that come from that, to snakes that crawl up and down below; but if we could get higher we should not be stung by them. A heavenly conversation is the way to contentment. Those who look at high things in the world meet with disappointments, and so they come to be discontented. Be as high as you will in spiritual meditations; God gives liberty there to any one of you to be as high as you will, above angels. But, for your outward estate, God would not have you aim at high things; 'Seekest thou great things?' said the Lord to Baruch, 'seek them not' (Jeremiah 45:5), you shall have your life for a prey. In these times especially, it would be a very great evil for anyone to aim at great things; seek them not, be willing to take hold low, and to creep low, and if God raises you, you will have cause to bless him, but if you should not be raised, there would not be much trouble. One who creeps low cannot fall far, but it is those who are on high whose fall bruises them most. That is a good rule: do not promise yourselves great things, neither aim at any great things in the world."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Lee

    Looking at the famous Scripture text of Philippians 4:11, Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs describes Christian contentment as “that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God’s wise and fatherly disposal in every condition.” In The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment, he presents a powerful and profound book on contentment as a source of peace in our hearts. Moving and Logical Burroughs writes in a moving and logical style. He likes numbered lists, and he Looking at the famous Scripture text of Philippians 4:11, Puritan Jeremiah Burroughs describes Christian contentment as “that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God’s wise and fatherly disposal in every condition.” In The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment, he presents a powerful and profound book on contentment as a source of peace in our hearts. Moving and Logical Burroughs writes in a moving and logical style. He likes numbered lists, and he likes to build upon his previous points. What I appreciate most is how Burroughs is able to analyze contentment from all angles. For instance, he states that it is possible for the Christian to be content yet unsatisfied. The reason is that a true Christian will always be wanting more of God. So while our we can be content in our circumstances, we ultimately long for satisfaction in Jesus. Burroughs uses many examples to illustrate his points. In one memorable section regarding contentment found in a gracious heart, he says that much like an empty bottle rings out when struck - an empty heart will cause a person to grumble and moan and be vocal in their disposition. This is contrasted with a full heart that will be quieter when struck upon, revealing a content and gracious spirit. Christ and Heaven Chapters 5 and 6 are the heart of the book, and they champion Christ as our source of contentment. He teaches us self-denial, the foolishness of vanity, the ability to know our own hearts, and what is truly necessary, the burdens of worldly prosperity, how God saves us from the desires of our heart, understanding the knowledge of God’s providence, our true relationship with the world, and how Christ is the substance of anything that is truly good and rightfully enjoyed in the world. While Christ is our ultimate source of contentment, Burroughs looks to the hope of heaven for additional strength. And those who find contentment will find that it is excellent and rewarding. Comfort and Contentment I was most impacted by the chapters that looked at the sin of murmuring. It reveals much about our spiritual condition, and I am ashamed to say that I murmur and grumble towards God and others. It is something I hope to combat with contentment in the future. The book concludes with 12 practical tips to help you find contentment. They are reasonable and achievable. And in a season where many of us find ourselves in situations that are outside of our control, there is no better time to look towards Christ as our source of comfort and contentment. I received a media copy of The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment and this is my honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hawkins

    Chapters 1-9 of this book were the best Puritan Paperback pages I have read. Burroughs, as typical of the Puritans, was (is) very gifted at being able to flesh out an idea and provide insight into how this works in life, while using quite helpful analogies and illustrations. In this book, he was doing it with the idea of contentment. His thoughts about what Christian contentment is, how to attain it, and the evils of murmuring (the opposite of contentment) were all outstanding. I have prayed thr Chapters 1-9 of this book were the best Puritan Paperback pages I have read. Burroughs, as typical of the Puritans, was (is) very gifted at being able to flesh out an idea and provide insight into how this works in life, while using quite helpful analogies and illustrations. In this book, he was doing it with the idea of contentment. His thoughts about what Christian contentment is, how to attain it, and the evils of murmuring (the opposite of contentment) were all outstanding. I have prayed through underlined portions of this book, and although I finished reading it now, I will continue to do this. It really is that helpful. In sum, I didn’t expect it to be as good as it is on this. He dives deeply into contentment with thoughts I would’ve have considered myself. Unfortunately, though, I thought the last four chapters (10-13) were considerably less insight. His points were less biblical based and the writing and points were much drier. In the final chapter, he made a couple good points, but overall, chapters 1-9 were, to me, a world different than chapters 10-13. You can even see that from the abundance of underlines in 1-9 and the scarcity in chapters 10-13. Why is this? Perhaps it’s because *I* was getting tired of reading it. But it seems to me that the topic had almost been exhausted, and the final four chapters were a mix of repetition, making points that didn’t seem to apply often, and trying to dig further than almost could be dug on the topic. I’m sure for many they gleaned a lot throughout the whole book, even the last four chapters. Yet as for me, I think if it was only chapters 1-10, it would’ve been one of the best old books I’ve ever read. Nonetheless, because chapters 1-9 were so incredibly insightful, practical, and life-changing (if implemented!), it deserves an easy 5 stars. It’s not the easiest read, but I’d still recommend it to anyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment had a really good message! Oh, so necessary, too. Don't lie to me: we are all discontent now and again. It might be over little things (I get discontent when I'm the one doing the dishes again) or over big things (some struggle with coveting their neighbor's belongings), but we all struggle with it now and again. It's ok! Jeremiah Burroughs was a preacher of Europe-wide renown, and he even admits to the occasional struggle. In his moderate-length expos The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment had a really good message! Oh, so necessary, too. Don't lie to me: we are all discontent now and again. It might be over little things (I get discontent when I'm the one doing the dishes again) or over big things (some struggle with coveting their neighbor's belongings), but we all struggle with it now and again. It's ok! Jeremiah Burroughs was a preacher of Europe-wide renown, and he even admits to the occasional struggle. In his moderate-length exposition on the "rare jewel" of Christian contentment, he shares insights from the Bible on how to seek and attain it, and gives encouragement to those currently struggling. The audiobook is about 8 hours long, and I don't think that Burroughs repeated a single Bible verse! He really knows his Bible, and quoted from many different parts, both Old and New Testament. I never felt that the book became repetitious in any way. One tiny thing irked me, though: his love of numbered lists. lol This might even completely escape others' notice, but I noticed, and became slightly irritated. I think every single chapter contained at least one numbered list. This might not matter if you're reading a physical copy, but I got to hear the narrator count to ten over and over again! lol Oh, another positive, to finish the compliment sandwich: the language was really accessible! The book was originally published in 1648, but I had no trouble with the language. (There were a very few references to the reader's servants.... oh how things have changed....) Overall, I definitely recommend. My pastor recommended it to us, and now I'm recommending it to you!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ty Lukasiewicz

    I liked this book. it was insightful and helpful for me. I must say that I personally am a child in the art and practice of contentment and still have much to learn. and I am sure that in due time if the father wills I will have grown in such a practice. In the rare jewel of contentment, Mr. Burroughs explains that there is much to learn in contentment. first he explains the mystery of contentment and how it applies to the christian life. then later explains how to obtain it. At the beginning of I liked this book. it was insightful and helpful for me. I must say that I personally am a child in the art and practice of contentment and still have much to learn. and I am sure that in due time if the father wills I will have grown in such a practice. In the rare jewel of contentment, Mr. Burroughs explains that there is much to learn in contentment. first he explains the mystery of contentment and how it applies to the christian life. then later explains how to obtain it. At the beginning of the book he begins by defining what this contentment is he writes: "Christian contentment is that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in Gods wise and fatherly disposal in every condition". he later gives an analogy of what this means. he writes that "it is like a man who gets his warmth from within and the whole body is warmed rather than a sickly man who sits by the fire and only gets his cloths warmed." the first few chapters were by far my favorite and found many things helpful and enjoyable to read. Burroughs does a good job at using scripture especially in the earlier parts of the book. I did however think that the book dragged on towards the end and think that the last few chapters were more repetitive. for this reason I rate it 4.5. I still really enjoyed it and truly made me think of the subject of contentment and what that means for my life. I personally have not read many puritan paperbacks but definitely want to read more. if you are wanting to learn about this jewel of christian contentment or want to grow in contentment yourself, this is a wonderful place to start (outside of the bible that is. please please start in the bible). recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sassa

    This will be a life-time book for me, one to read and re-read, listen and re-listen. Jeremiah Burroughs was a Puritan preacher who lived from 1599-1646 in England. The book “The Rare Jewel of Contentment” is a compilation of a series of his sermons which expound and apply the words of the Apostle Paul from Philippians 4: 11 Not that I speak in regard to need, for I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content: 12 I know how to be abased, and I know how to abound. Everywhere and in all thing This will be a life-time book for me, one to read and re-read, listen and re-listen. Jeremiah Burroughs was a Puritan preacher who lived from 1599-1646 in England. The book “The Rare Jewel of Contentment” is a compilation of a series of his sermons which expound and apply the words of the Apostle Paul from Philippians 4: 11 Not that I speak in regard to need, for I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content: 12 I know how to be abased, and I know how to abound. Everywhere and in all things I have learned both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need. 13 I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. What is “CONTENTMENT?” Burroughs defines Christian contentment: “Christian contentment is that sweet, inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, which freely submits to and delights in God’s wise and fatherly disposal in every condition.” (p.19) That hits deeply within my soul and mind. It is a most important quality to nurture and develop but it is not an easy one. This book deeply explores and teaches the purpose of contentment, what contentment looks like in our lives, explicit guidance on how to work towards contentment and, very importantly, its eternal reward. Burroughs wrote, “The doctrinal conclusion briefly is this: That to be well skilled in the mystery of Christian contentment is the duty, glory and excellence of a Christian.” I highly recommend this book and audiobook, which is unabridged. It will touch the heart eager to please and glorify God.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Carl

    Pious isn’t a naughty word. Piety as it relates to our sanctification being worked out in obedience founded on love and fear of God should be foundational for every Christian. Jeremiah Burroughs labors extensively to show that contentment in the Christian life is one of the means Christ uses for our sanctification and piety. It is a mystical truth that as our knowledge and love of God grows, our contentment in all circumstances grows commensurately as we understand that our wills are subservient Pious isn’t a naughty word. Piety as it relates to our sanctification being worked out in obedience founded on love and fear of God should be foundational for every Christian. Jeremiah Burroughs labors extensively to show that contentment in the Christian life is one of the means Christ uses for our sanctification and piety. It is a mystical truth that as our knowledge and love of God grows, our contentment in all circumstances grows commensurately as we understand that our wills are subservient to the will of the Father and that all things are for His glory and our good. This is not to say we don’t recognize evil, suffering, and hardship. On the contrary, the recognition of those realities should strengthen our contentment in our present circumstances as we realize their ultimate purposes, whatever they may be. Read this. Pray over it. Be content and know that what we have in Christ far surpasses all the glories of this world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    This was quite a read. I could never have imagined so many dimensions to contentment and yet now that I've come to the end it all makes perfect sense, and I feel we don't give the idea enough weight or consideration. Thankfully, Burroughs labours over every aspect of this frame: what it is, how Jesus teaches it, why it is valuable, why being discontent is harmful, the excuses we make against contentment, and finally how to attain contentment. I took so many notes, and I hope I can discipline mys This was quite a read. I could never have imagined so many dimensions to contentment and yet now that I've come to the end it all makes perfect sense, and I feel we don't give the idea enough weight or consideration. Thankfully, Burroughs labours over every aspect of this frame: what it is, how Jesus teaches it, why it is valuable, why being discontent is harmful, the excuses we make against contentment, and finally how to attain contentment. I took so many notes, and I hope I can discipline myself to read it again in the future. It would be a discipline, because reading this was no fun! Despite seeming short it took a long time to get through, and was often uncomfortable as Burroughs describes the sin of discontent and why we have no right to be so. At the same time, it was uniquely helpful in a season where I could otherwise slip into 'murmuring' - having just moved to a new city all alone, with many obstacles in my path. Yet Burroughs is so thorough and unyielding in his demands that we are constantly content, or pursuing contentment, that I imagine this book would seem timely whenever you pick it up. If you're a believer, I highly recommend! And to finish with just a few of the quotes I wrote down: *** Contentment is the inward, quiet, gracious frame of spirit, freely submitting to and taking pleasure in God’s disposal in every condition. 40 I know nothing more effective for quieting a Christian soul and getting contentment than this, setting your heart to work in the duties of the immediate circumstances that you are now in, and taking heed of your thoughts about other conditions as a mere temptation. 52 Your calling is low and mean; yet do not be discontented with that, for you have a principle within you (if you are a godly man or woman) of grace, which raises your lowest actions to be higher in God’s esteem, than all the brave, glorious actions that are done in the world. The principle of faith does it: if any man or woman goes on in obedience to God in a way of faith in the calling in which god has set them - doing this, I say, through a principle of faith- it raises this action, and makes it a more glorious action than all the glorious victories of Alexander and Caesar. 198 Every Christian should say: ‘Have I wealth now? I should prepare for poverty. Have I health now? I should prepare for sickness. Have I liberty? Let me prepare for imprisonment. How do I know what God may call me to? Have I comfort and peace now in my conscience, does God shine upon me? While I have this let me prepare for God’s withdrawing from me. Am I delivered from temptations? Let me prepare now for the time of temptations.’ If you would do so, the change of your condition would not be so grievous to you. 203

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erica Reagan Powell

    I doubt there is a Christian on earth who cannot relate to and benefit from this book. Besides expounding upon the grievous bondage of discontentment in contrast to the joyous freedom of contentment, Burroughs examines the various unfounded excuses we give for our complaints (which I found particularly helpful). His writing is somewhat repetitive, but I enjoyed his colorful analogies and appreciated the practical advice he offered for living a contented life.

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