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Studies in Iconology: Humanistic Themes in the Art of the Renaissance

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In Studies in Iconology, the themes and concepts of Renaissance art are analysed and related to both classical and medieval tendencies.


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In Studies in Iconology, the themes and concepts of Renaissance art are analysed and related to both classical and medieval tendencies.

30 review for Studies in Iconology: Humanistic Themes in the Art of the Renaissance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    Apparently Panofsky invented the way I do art history. Huh.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vitani Days

    Gran bel saggio, grande classico degli studi sull'iconologia (e della storia dell'arte in genere).Dopo una ricca introduzione dove Panofsky spiega la genesi dell'opera e il suo metodo di lavoro, si passa a una serie di saggi dedicati, nell'ordine, dine, a: - Preistoria umana in due cicli pittorici di Piero di Cosimo; - Il Padre Tempo; - Cupido Cieco; - Il movimento neoplatonico a Firenze; - Il movimento neoplatonico e Michelangelo. Il volume, va detto innanzitutto, non è "per addetti ai lavori". O meg Gran bel saggio, grande classico degli studi sull'iconologia (e della storia dell'arte in genere).Dopo una ricca introduzione dove Panofsky spiega la genesi dell'opera e il suo metodo di lavoro, si passa a una serie di saggi dedicati, nell'ordine, dine, a: - Preistoria umana in due cicli pittorici di Piero di Cosimo; - Il Padre Tempo; - Cupido Cieco; - Il movimento neoplatonico a Firenze; - Il movimento neoplatonico e Michelangelo. Il volume, va detto innanzitutto, non è "per addetti ai lavori". O meglio, non è solo per loro. Scritto davvero bene e altrettanto ben spiegato, "Studi di iconologia" risulta fruibilissimo e godibile da chiunque sia interessato all'argomento pur se non del mestiere. Panofsky infatti non descrive soltanto le opere, ma anche il contesto sociale e storico in cui sono state create, con avvincente confronto di fonti e temi. Il libro si avvale di un ricco apparato iconografico (peccato solo che le immagini siano in bianco e nero) e di un'ancor più ricca bibliografia in appendice. Insomma, un volume interessantissimo e dal linguaggio affascinante, che ogni appassionato d'arte dovrebbe avere in biblioteca!

  3. 5 out of 5

    8314

    By Gods in heaven I want to shelve this book in psychoanalysis shelf! This is the application of the methodology of Interpretation of Dreams in Art History at its finest. That alone says more than enough — not that I'm implying Panofsky was indebted to psychoanalysis methods, though, it's quite the other way around: this is how psychoanalysis should be applied to the study of Art. Freud himself would blush and agog if he were still alive when this book published. Also, I do enjoy a book with some By Gods in heaven I want to shelve this book in psychoanalysis shelf! This is the application of the methodology of Interpretation of Dreams in Art History at its finest. That alone says more than enough — not that I'm implying Panofsky was indebted to psychoanalysis methods, though, it's quite the other way around: this is how psychoanalysis should be applied to the study of Art. Freud himself would blush and agog if he were still alive when this book published. Also, I do enjoy a book with some actual threads and plots that lead everything to a climax (last time I read a well-structured, story-telling, semi-detective-novel-like theoretical work was Leo Strauss' What is Political Philosophy, and before that Keith Thomas' Religion and the Decline of Magic, and ... that's it, I guess). Panofsky surprised me with his last essay on Michelangelo. He practices in his writing what he preaches. What a glorious stunt. I would so want to be able to pull this stunt myself! Now that sounds familiar ...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael McNamara

    This book is great for anyone no matter their level of knowledge about the art of the Renaissance. The reproductions are quite good. Panofsky ably details the iconology found across the arts and its common meaning.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex Foo

    :)))))))

  6. 4 out of 5

    Will Schumer

    Based

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katarina

    HRV: Pročitano za nastavu na faksu i korišteno u seminarima. ENG: Read for my college classes and used for seminars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nur

    Keşke çevirisi daha anlaşılabilir olsaydı.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Babre

    Meravigliosa ricerca storico artística

  10. 4 out of 5

    Frank Stein

    I've wanted to read this book forever and can't believe that of all libraries DC's was the one to have it. I have to admit first that the innumerable references to B- and C- list Renaissance artists went over my head, and his assumption of familiarity with obscure classical texts could be annoying, but that doesn't mar the crux of the book. It's a series of lectures from 1937, collected and revised here as essays, which trace the development of Renaissance iconography out of the Middle Ages. Panof I've wanted to read this book forever and can't believe that of all libraries DC's was the one to have it. I have to admit first that the innumerable references to B- and C- list Renaissance artists went over my head, and his assumption of familiarity with obscure classical texts could be annoying, but that doesn't mar the crux of the book. It's a series of lectures from 1937, collected and revised here as essays, which trace the development of Renaissance iconography out of the Middle Ages. Panofsky focuses on the development of several specific themes or characters, such as Father Time and Cupid, and shows how they represent a new departure from both medieval and classic representations. For instance, the image of Father Time as an old man with a scythe emerges first from the Roman conflation of Saturn, "Cronus" in Greek, with Time, "Kronos" in Greek, who was previously a young, winged man. This deity is then giving the medieval moralistic burden of representing "time eating its own children" (Saturn consuming Zeus) and conflated with the character of Death, due both to representing time and the sickle Saturn carried as a harvest deity. Finally in the Renaissance Father Time is portrayed as an old man with flowing robes often carrying an hourglass, itself occasionally winged. The book provides a wonderful introduction to what exactly was distinctive about Renaissance portrayals of classic themes, and how they came about. Art History nerds, who'll know more of the background than I do, will probably enjoy it even more.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    another stolen book (i.e. hello cree).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    sooooo interesting!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sotiris

  16. 4 out of 5

    TowHid UccHash

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paola

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tuttle Buttle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Konstantinos Michail

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ma Sol

  21. 5 out of 5

    Azooz

  22. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Robinson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alessio Boccazzi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ovania

  25. 4 out of 5

    Valentina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Martina Annabelle

  27. 5 out of 5

    AleGG

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amélie Asturiol

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michal

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aryhs Enaj

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