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Emerald Eyes

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The first volume in the science fiction epic Tales of the Continuing Time, Emerald Eyes is set in 2062 and introduces favorite series character Trent the Thief. The brutal Unification War has united earth. In Occupied America, the gene-engineered Castanaveras telepaths have just won a hard-fought freedom. But not everyone agrees with the ruling – least of all, cyborg Peace The first volume in the science fiction epic Tales of the Continuing Time, Emerald Eyes is set in 2062 and introduces favorite series character Trent the Thief. The brutal Unification War has united earth. In Occupied America, the gene-engineered Castanaveras telepaths have just won a hard-fought freedom. But not everyone agrees with the ruling – least of all, cyborg Peaceforcer Elite Mohammed Vance.


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The first volume in the science fiction epic Tales of the Continuing Time, Emerald Eyes is set in 2062 and introduces favorite series character Trent the Thief. The brutal Unification War has united earth. In Occupied America, the gene-engineered Castanaveras telepaths have just won a hard-fought freedom. But not everyone agrees with the ruling – least of all, cyborg Peace The first volume in the science fiction epic Tales of the Continuing Time, Emerald Eyes is set in 2062 and introduces favorite series character Trent the Thief. The brutal Unification War has united earth. In Occupied America, the gene-engineered Castanaveras telepaths have just won a hard-fought freedom. But not everyone agrees with the ruling – least of all, cyborg Peaceforcer Elite Mohammed Vance.

30 review for Emerald Eyes

  1. 4 out of 5

    spikeINflorida

    What an amazing read! Where this story may lack character development it makes up for with an amazing mix of telepathy, time travel, cyborgs, cyber space (cyberpunk!), high tech, dystopia, and nuclear holocaust. Movie scenes invoked included The Matrix, The Fifth Element, Harry Potter, James Bond, and Terminator. I heard echoes of Philip K Dick, Robert Silverberg, Dan Simmons, Joe Haldeman, and LE Modesitt Jr. The book contains the Internet, tablets, and cell phones 10 to 15 years before their a What an amazing read! Where this story may lack character development it makes up for with an amazing mix of telepathy, time travel, cyborgs, cyber space (cyberpunk!), high tech, dystopia, and nuclear holocaust. Movie scenes invoked included The Matrix, The Fifth Element, Harry Potter, James Bond, and Terminator. I heard echoes of Philip K Dick, Robert Silverberg, Dan Simmons, Joe Haldeman, and LE Modesitt Jr. The book contains the Internet, tablets, and cell phones 10 to 15 years before their arrival. Shit there's even badass flying cars! Strongly recommend this book to all SF fans. Can't wait to read book 2 The Long Run.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ric

    This is decidedly geek SF, requiring a warning sticker for "high geek coefficient". For one, the story jumps around in small episodes of as little as two paragraphs long among multiple POVs. Like watching a stop motion vid with the parallel story lines interspersed. Truly dyslexia inducing. For another, it deals with some of the most difficult SF topics to depict in written form --- telepaths, time travel, artificial intelligence --- all in one volume. Add to this a large cast of characters and This is decidedly geek SF, requiring a warning sticker for "high geek coefficient". For one, the story jumps around in small episodes of as little as two paragraphs long among multiple POVs. Like watching a stop motion vid with the parallel story lines interspersed. Truly dyslexia inducing. For another, it deals with some of the most difficult SF topics to depict in written form --- telepaths, time travel, artificial intelligence --- all in one volume. Add to this a large cast of characters and we have the formula for a challenging read.What's going for this book? Snazzy action sequences. An epic battle that reads like the script for an X-men movie. Cool gosh-wow tech toys sprinkled throughout. Considering this was written in the 80s, it does not feel dated at all. In particular, the cyber aspects read remarkably like these were written recently. The author states in a postscript that "the first published description of internet addiction occurs in this novel." Quite a feat. I'm certainly glad I came across this book.I had real difficulty with the author's style for the first half of the book, then relaxed into a comfortable reading progress once the jumping around finally settled down. So maybe I'm not that much of a geek; i.e., I cannot read multiple storylines shuffled together like a deck of cards. On the other hand, I did finish the book. The book is available online at this site: Immunity, ostensibly with the author's permission.The titular Emerald Eyes refers to the optics of the first "genegineered" telepath, Carl Castanaveras. The book opens as the small army of man-made telepaths achieve their freedom from their military/governmental masters. It closes with a glimpse of the lives of the later generation of natural-born telepaths. Along the way, the author brings in time travelers, cyber life, cyborgs, and more geek candy. I would have been happy if the book ended with the battle of the telepaths and the enhanced Peacekeepers, but the book does one more interesting step with the story of the ultimate thief. This latter is basically a hook for the next book of the series. I'm looking forward to reading the next book in the series and more from this author.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Seidman

    It's very unusual for me to abandon a book a third of a way through, but I just couldn't get into Emerald Eyes. A friend recommended it because it was an old favorite of his, but it's one of those stories that just hasn't aged well. It opens with what seems like an irreconcilable time-travel paradox, and goes from there to a vision of a near future world where the U.N. has conquered the USA and flying cars abound. This futuristic world probably seemed fascinatingly plausible 30 years ago, but now It's very unusual for me to abandon a book a third of a way through, but I just couldn't get into Emerald Eyes. A friend recommended it because it was an old favorite of his, but it's one of those stories that just hasn't aged well. It opens with what seems like an irreconcilable time-travel paradox, and goes from there to a vision of a near future world where the U.N. has conquered the USA and flying cars abound. This futuristic world probably seemed fascinatingly plausible 30 years ago, but now seems merely unrealistic. That wouldn't be a problem if there were good character development. But that happens to be Moran's weakest point. I actually had a hard time keeping the characters straight, since there was nothing to distinguish them. Watching these two-dimensional cutouts play out a slow-moving plot designed to support a four-book series was not at all entertaining. I likely would have enjoyed this book had I read it upon publication, as I really enjoy a compelling and creative view of the future. But there's a reason why this book is now out of print.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan McCormack

    This book has been sitting in my queue for quite some time, but I had held off reading it until I was prepared for another four-book commitment (this being the first of the Continuing Time series). I also held off partly because I had heard from a few people that this was a "difficult" book, but a necessary entry point into the series. I would have to say I agree with what I was told: Emerald Eyes is a fascinating, frustrating, entertaining and occasionally confusing book that I enjoyed, with res This book has been sitting in my queue for quite some time, but I had held off reading it until I was prepared for another four-book commitment (this being the first of the Continuing Time series). I also held off partly because I had heard from a few people that this was a "difficult" book, but a necessary entry point into the series. I would have to say I agree with what I was told: Emerald Eyes is a fascinating, frustrating, entertaining and occasionally confusing book that I enjoyed, with reservation (hence the three stars). Keys-Moran does what some authors of world-building series do: he throws you into the deep end to see if you can swim, and writes the story the way he wants. Multiple stories and voices are interlaced, in often hallucinatory fashion, and the reader is left wondering just what the hell is going on at several points. Iain Banks was guilty of this with several of his sci-fi novels (e.g., Feersum Endjinn or Inversions), though the comparison ends there; I don't have an obvious reference point for this novel, which is good. Keys-Moran has a lot of interesting ideas, and hints at a far grander vision that will presumably be laid out in subsequent works. The thing I found most challenging about the book was its narrative structure. It's almost three books in one, which is not entirely a good thing; each of these "novellas" had different main characters, a different pace, and varying tone. I found this especially problematic when it came to the ending, which fell flat for me. Despite these flaws, I enjoyed Keys-Moran's world-building and central characters....I'm reading the second novel in this series now, so we'll see how it pans out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    "Emerald Eyes" by Daniel Keyes Moran, is the first book of his Continuing Time Series. I originally read this book when I was in Dallas, sometime during 1988-1990. Funny thing is...I don't remember enjoying it as much the first time I read it. Sure, I liked it well enough to read the two sequels ("The Long Run" and "The Last Dancer") but this time I mainly re-read it because I wanted to re-read book 2..."The Long Run"...a book I remember as being non-stop action. I was pleasantly surprised to fi "Emerald Eyes" by Daniel Keyes Moran, is the first book of his Continuing Time Series. I originally read this book when I was in Dallas, sometime during 1988-1990. Funny thing is...I don't remember enjoying it as much the first time I read it. Sure, I liked it well enough to read the two sequels ("The Long Run" and "The Last Dancer") but this time I mainly re-read it because I wanted to re-read book 2..."The Long Run"...a book I remember as being non-stop action. I was pleasantly surprised to find myself unable to switch books while I was reading "Emerald Eyes" (I normally bounced back and forth between 2-3 books). In fact, it only took me a week and a half to finish it (pretty darn fast for me, as my average is finishing 1 book per month). If you like early cyberpunk with telepathy/thievery, give the first two books of this series a shot. Avoid "The Last Dancer" as it sucks IMHO. I remember being mightily disappointed in that book... EE and LR can be hard to find in paperback, so I was pleased to find them at the fsand.com in EBook format. ***Update*** Book 4 is now out! The title is "The A.I. War, Book One: The Big Boost". Once I re-read "The Long Run" I may have to re-read "The Last Dancer" so that I can properly enjoy this brand new addition to the series. :(

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Fennig

    This book is complex, challenging, and occasionally hard to follow. I didn't figure out what was actually going on until my second read-through of the series. What you have to understand is that, despite the criminally inaccurate portrayal by the publisher, this isn't pulp SF. It's a mature example of the genre, an intricate and well-thought-out story which asks complex questions about the nature of humanity, where you draw the line between human and not, and the place of the individual in the u This book is complex, challenging, and occasionally hard to follow. I didn't figure out what was actually going on until my second read-through of the series. What you have to understand is that, despite the criminally inaccurate portrayal by the publisher, this isn't pulp SF. It's a mature example of the genre, an intricate and well-thought-out story which asks complex questions about the nature of humanity, where you draw the line between human and not, and the place of the individual in the universe. The cosmology is nigh incomprehensible, but feels as though you're grasping at the edge of something when you begin to understand the way the characters refer to time and to reality. To me, this adds an element of verisimilitude and certainly a touch of the mystical. Don't expect hard SF going into this - the views of the internet and communication are dated, and a sense of mysticism and magic pervades throughout the series. As an entry into a complicated world, Moran could have done a lot worse - I read other reviews which referred to this book being thrown into the deep end, but by the time you read the other three books in the series, you'll discover that he started as gently as he could, given the constraints of the material.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    This book tells the tale of the Castanaveras telepaths. They were created by a unified world government that was dipping its toes in genetic engineering in order to create super soldiers. What they got was not what they bargained for. The book is notable for being an early example of the cyberpunk genre with all of its attendant dystopic subtexts, while still envisioning a future world that was not based upon Asian culture, but Western. It is centered firmly in the United States and many of its t This book tells the tale of the Castanaveras telepaths. They were created by a unified world government that was dipping its toes in genetic engineering in order to create super soldiers. What they got was not what they bargained for. The book is notable for being an early example of the cyberpunk genre with all of its attendant dystopic subtexts, while still envisioning a future world that was not based upon Asian culture, but Western. It is centered firmly in the United States and many of its threads deal with nationalism and how democracies can sometimes so simply become dictatorships, both large and small. This is a book that I return to every few years to read again to inspire myself, to celebrate all of its tragic heroes and to remember that the world is not so dark a place.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Set in the near-ish future. This book starts out as a story about a race of telepaths and their conflict with a horribly dysfunctional government. Then it transitions rather abruptly to a story about a thief, a few years later. Review of the telepath story: The author was so excited by his future-history that he didn't do much in the way of character, and the plot was uniformly grim. Review of the thief story: Also pretty grim, but mercifully short.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    A friend loaned me this many, many years ago and I've had a hankering to reread it (and the following volumes) but it and the others are out of print and very hard to find. I recently discovered that Moran has made a number of his books, including this one, available as editions on his blog. I downloaded them immediately and enjoyed my reread of what is actually quite a bleak book about the genetic engineering of a line of telepaths and what happens to them.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rosalie

    The formatting lacked much needed breaks. Bouncing around to different people and places without warning gave me whiplash. The story was interesting and held my attention but the ending was lacking.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Stupendously bad writing. I first noticed at, "WITH A SHOWER of gamma rays I came into existence at the fast end of time." What is the fast end of time? I wrote this off as world building. Then: "As he grew older, what would be known, more than a thousand years later, as the Gift of the House of November, grew also." As I read the book, what would be known, in five minutes, as the Worst Book of the Summer, worsened. "THERE WERE TIMES when Shana de Nostri did not mind the fact that she was not human, Stupendously bad writing. I first noticed at, "WITH A SHOWER of gamma rays I came into existence at the fast end of time." What is the fast end of time? I wrote this off as world building. Then: "As he grew older, what would be known, more than a thousand years later, as the Gift of the House of November, grew also." As I read the book, what would be known, in five minutes, as the Worst Book of the Summer, worsened. "THERE WERE TIMES when Shana de Nostri did not mind the fact that she was not human, but now was not one of those times." There were times, when Mike did not mind reading poor writing, but now was not one of those times. I gave up at: "Shana was nude except for her fur. Her nipples were clearly visible, and a human who stared – and some had, though not more than once – could have made out the outline of her genitalia through her fur." Given the high ratings, I bet there's some cool ideas and plots in there, but Mr. Moran needs to work with a prose stylist, aka a ghostwriter.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Morro3

    Author created one of the most believable, textured, immersive, and yet fantastic science fiction worlds I have ever encountered in print. His stories, "The Tales of the Continuing Time", are a saga that stretches from 64,000 BC into our distant future covering such diverse topics as the origins of the Human Race, the nature of Artificial Intelligence, Telepathy, Time Travel, the ultimate fate of the Internet, Eugenics, Genetic Engineering, the way that Technology as a whole evolves, as well as Author created one of the most believable, textured, immersive, and yet fantastic science fiction worlds I have ever encountered in print. His stories, "The Tales of the Continuing Time", are a saga that stretches from 64,000 BC into our distant future covering such diverse topics as the origins of the Human Race, the nature of Artificial Intelligence, Telepathy, Time Travel, the ultimate fate of the Internet, Eugenics, Genetic Engineering, the way that Technology as a whole evolves, as well as philosophical issues such as Environmentalism, the role of Violence in the life of a moral man, the value Humor, the sustainability of ideas such as independent-nations vs world-government, and the limits of Love. Carl castanaveras from Daniel keys Moran's 'emerald eyes'. Carl has a bit of a rage problem, but he's awesome.

  13. 4 out of 5

    William Leight

    I just didn't find this to be particularly interesting. None of the characters really connected, the hints of a larger struggle than the one depicted here failed to intrigue, and Moran doesn't really have any new takes on the whole telepaths (or whatever)-must-face-a-hostile-population thing. Also, it was hard to take the future timeline, in which a French-dominated UN conquers the US, all that seriously.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brent Winslow

    One of the funnest sci fi novels I've read in years. Emerald Eyes tells a believable story of the future of genetic engineering, its impact on war, and a logical extension of current profit first politics. Written in 1988, Moran seemed prescient in his descriptions of the internet, mobile devices and AI.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    One of my husband's favorite book. I found it interesting but the story jumped around a lot and thre wasn't a lot of character building.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Subject BGD

    I love this series!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Glen Engel-Cox

    Long a favorite of the rec.arts.sf.written newsgroup, Daniel Keys Moran is an author who, by all rights, should be more popular than he is. Here is a writer who has an world so thoroughly mapped out that he plans thirty-two books to tell its entire story. While his influences are centered directly in the science fiction field, his plotting and writing are strong, if not subtle. What makes Moran so different from bestselling authors like, say, Orson Scott Card or Lois McMaster Bujold, who have si Long a favorite of the rec.arts.sf.written newsgroup, Daniel Keys Moran is an author who, by all rights, should be more popular than he is. Here is a writer who has an world so thoroughly mapped out that he plans thirty-two books to tell its entire story. While his influences are centered directly in the science fiction field, his plotting and writing are strong, if not subtle. What makes Moran so different from bestselling authors like, say, Orson Scott Card or Lois McMaster Bujold, who have similar influences and styles? Maybe it is because he is not as prolific as these two, and can't satisfy the fan craving for one to two books a year? Let me get it straight here, and say that Moran's writing is never going to win him any literary prizes. His goal is adventure on the grand scale, not style or depth of human understanding. Yes, he can touch on emotions, but it is the action--the events--that concern him. It is a proud science fiction tradition, of which Isaac Asimov was its chief adherent for so long. Moran's a modern author, though, and while he writes in a traditional manner, his subject matter and some of his language would have been quite shocking in 1950. Emerald Eyes is the first volume in Moran's epic vision of a series entitled "The Tales of the Continuing Time," a series that he has been planning and designing since he was thirteen years old (he goes into this in a quite amusing afterword to this volume). I remember doing the same thing when I was a teenager; I had a couple of spiral ring notebooks that I wrote the adventures of a couple of friends and myself interacting with fantasy and movie characters. I had them all planned out in alphabetical order, with the first two volumes entitled Anything Can Happen and Does and Anything Goes (I know, I know, but I was young, and it is amazing the sheer intensity and ambition of youth). I wonder now where those two notebooks are, having lost my vision for them sometime in high school. Moran's vision never left him, and he continued to define, invent, and catalogue characters and events in the epic struggle of the "Time Wars." The timing of Emerald Eyes is in 50 years, when the United Nations has assumed control over the earth, sometimes by force as in the case of Japan and the United States. The French, who backed the UN early, are the ethnicity that now is in the ascendancy. Trying to genetically engineer humans to be better soldiers for them (to help control what they view as endless resistance), they create a race of telepaths, the first of which is Carl Castanaveras. Most of the novel is about Carl's struggle to free the telepaths (numbering almost 350 after thirty years of gene splicing and cloning experiments) from being slaves in the service of the U.N.'s peacekeeping force. There's a lot going on beyond that in this novel, because of the depth of Moran's world building. The story may follow one plot, but there's many more sub-plots going on that intermix with the major plot, and while some of them are resolved, many of them are left to be the subject of later volumes. In most cases, this would be extremely annoying, but Moran makes it work through a combination of first person and third person narration, and through the jutzpah of trying to envision a series involving time travel in such detail. After finishing Emerald Eyes, it is hard not to desire more, to find out exactly what was going on with Camber Tremodian and his prey, what the House of November was and what was its gift, what a Long Run entailed, and who was Lady Blue. This is stuff that cults are built around, and Moran has his faithful. But, for some reason, none of the faithful seem to be publishers. There have only been three novels of the Continuing Time published (I think--I was trying to figure out if Moran's first novel, Armageddon Blues, was a Continuing Time novel or not), and recently Moran bought the rights to the books back. His most recent effort is a collaborative novel with his sister that I do not believe is in this series. I enjoyed Emerald Eyes, and I've been told that The Long Run is even better. If it is, I might have to join the faithful and queue up to wait for future volumes, even if Moran has to self-publish them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Friesen

    The 1st book in Moran's Continuing Times series, this one chronicles the history of the Castanaveras telepaths. Set against a backdrop of an America occupied by the UN and administered in much the same fashion as Germany after WW2, the telepaths were originally genengineered to create a force of super strong soldiers to help occupy North America. That experiment was a failure, in that the first product, Carl Castanaveras, was moderately stronger, faster and smarter than average people, but not e The 1st book in Moran's Continuing Times series, this one chronicles the history of the Castanaveras telepaths. Set against a backdrop of an America occupied by the UN and administered in much the same fashion as Germany after WW2, the telepaths were originally genengineered to create a force of super strong soldiers to help occupy North America. That experiment was a failure, in that the first product, Carl Castanaveras, was moderately stronger, faster and smarter than average people, but not exceptionally so. However, once he entered puberty, Carl became the world's most powerful telepath and became an indispensable intelligence tool for the UN PeaceKeeping Force. This novel chronicles the telepaths efforts to gain freedom from a world spanning bureaucracy that wishes to keep them slaves. The characters are a bit shallow, but interesting nonetheless. While it is not as good as The Long Run, this is an excellent cyberpunk novel and one of my favourites in the genre. It also provides a lot of valuable backstory for his other novels in the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Emerald Eyes is the story of a group of about 200 genetically engineered telepaths who were designed to be assassins and spies for the UN, in UN-occupied America in the early 21st century. It is also the first novel in a storyline that Moran has said would take something like 30 novels to encompass, of which only about 4 have been written. The telepaths become involved in a confrontation with the UN after receiving their freedom from their UN masters in a court case, with disastrous consequences. Emerald Eyes is the story of a group of about 200 genetically engineered telepaths who were designed to be assassins and spies for the UN, in UN-occupied America in the early 21st century. It is also the first novel in a storyline that Moran has said would take something like 30 novels to encompass, of which only about 4 have been written. The telepaths become involved in a confrontation with the UN after receiving their freedom from their UN masters in a court case, with disastrous consequences. The sequels expand on the story and are amazingly engaging, fun reads. Unfortunately, it appears Mr. Moran has moved on to other projects and won't likely produce any more stories set in this universe.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ivor Thomas

    "The Last Dancer" was recommended to me by a well read and articulate poster on the Steemit platform as his all-time favorite--placing it over Heineken, Niven, Herbert. I was like, whaaaaa? What writer is that? I decided to start at the beginning with this book and I'm telling you all... he's not wrong in saying that. Personally, I doubt that anything will surpass "Dune" in my lifetime, but I am thrilled to be reading these *outstanding* overlooked gems. I'm currently on the second book, and it "The Last Dancer" was recommended to me by a well read and articulate poster on the Steemit platform as his all-time favorite--placing it over Heineken, Niven, Herbert. I was like, whaaaaa? What writer is that? I decided to start at the beginning with this book and I'm telling you all... he's not wrong in saying that. Personally, I doubt that anything will surpass "Dune" in my lifetime, but I am thrilled to be reading these *outstanding* overlooked gems. I'm currently on the second book, and it is even better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    April

    A good story overall, but I kept feeling like I was missing something... perhaps reading more of them might give me the info I feel I am missing. I very much liked some of the characters and their histories... really felt for a few, and could have cared less about others... which is kinda sad considering one of them was the "main" character. I've given this one 3 out of 5... but might change it later as I intend on reading others in this series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Randall Carver

    One of my go back to reads. Love it every time :) What's not to like? A great setup for the continuing time. Fast action from the start, and not too much talking head time. Wonderful characterization, loveable, sometimes uncomfortable given their flaws. Solid plot with enough predictability to engage and surprises to entertain. Mr. Moran is a great author who needs to write more for me :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    Birth and unfortunate fate of first generation of telepaths, a few decades from now after the UN has bloodily taken over America.reminded me some of STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND, both in the generalnstory arc and in the way that the author kept digressing or taking a broader view for an infodump. I dont think he quite captured the telepaths' closeness, but it's a good story overall.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Will Wesson

    This series is (or was) pretty impossible to find, and it's wild stuff. I remember reading that the author plotted out the whole series in a spiral notebook in his teens and then went on to actually write it, which seems like a minor miracle to me, and it's good stuff, which seems like a major one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Dloski

    These are the greatest sci fi books I've ever read, the entire series. The books are very difficult to find, as they are out of print. I suggest getting to your local used book store ASAP to dig them up. Nothing more needs to be said. They are unbelievably potent and dense books.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    Kind of old school (written in the 80s) but not too dated. The retro elements are kind of why I like it. If you are an sf nostalgist (at times) you might like it too. But the 2nd volume in the series (The Long Run) is more fun, otherwise.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Collins

    Moran is nuts. It's great. Gotta concentrate during this one. His afterword mentions 30 in thus series. 30. Which means he drops pieces in clearly for a later explanation. Throw Time travel in there and it gets hairy. What a ride though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Warren Rochelle

    We are left with a cliffhanger--and does anyone know if there was ever a sequel? I love Moran's stories: the alternate history that seems to go on forever, the heroic characters.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scythan

    It was decent. I'm not a big fan of telepathy though.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Luis

    Thankful for the friend who recommended I start this series with book 2, which was more fun. Still, a worthwhile read.

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