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It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers

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Welcome to tonight's feature presentation, brought to you by an unholy alliance of our spellcasters at Hex Publishers and movie-mages at the Colorado Festival of Horror. Please be advised that all emergency exits have been locked for this special nostalgia-curdled premiere of death. From crinkling celluloid to ferocious flesh—from the silver screen to your hammering heart— Welcome to tonight's feature presentation, brought to you by an unholy alliance of our spellcasters at Hex Publishers and movie-mages at the Colorado Festival of Horror. Please be advised that all emergency exits have been locked for this special nostalgia-curdled premiere of death. From crinkling celluloid to ferocious flesh—from the silver screen to your hammering heart—behold as a swarm of werewolves, serial killers, Satanists, Elder Gods, aliens, ghosts, and unclassifiable monsters are loosed upon your auditorium. Relax, and allow our ushers to help with your buckets of popcorn—and blood; your ticket stubs—and severed limbs; your comfort candy—and body bags. Kick back and scream as you settle into a fate worse than Hell. Tonight's director's cut is guaranteed to slash you apart. Edited by Joshua Viola Produced in collaboration with the Colorado Festival of Horror Cover art by AJ Nazzaro and Joshua Viola Story art by Xander Smith Header art by Aaron Lovett Contents: FOREWORD Bret and Jeanni Smith INTRODUCTION Paul Campion ALIEN PARASITES FROM OUTER SPACE Warren Hammond RETURN OF THE ALIEN PARASITES FROM OUTER SPACE Angie Hodapp NEGATIVE CREEP Alvaro Zinos-Amaro HELLULOID Dayton Ward and Kevin Dilmore RISE, YE VERMIN! Betty Rocksteady THE CRONENBERG CONCERTO Keith Ferrell CREATURE FEATURE Gary Jonas INVISIBLE Mario Acevedo SCREEN HAUNT Orrin Grey THE DEVIL'S REEL Sean Eads and Joshua Viola ON THE ROCKS K. Nicole Davis COMING ATTRACTIONS Stephen Graham Jones LATE SLEEPERS Steve Rasnic Tem SPECIAL MAKEUP Kevin J. Anderson


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Welcome to tonight's feature presentation, brought to you by an unholy alliance of our spellcasters at Hex Publishers and movie-mages at the Colorado Festival of Horror. Please be advised that all emergency exits have been locked for this special nostalgia-curdled premiere of death. From crinkling celluloid to ferocious flesh—from the silver screen to your hammering heart— Welcome to tonight's feature presentation, brought to you by an unholy alliance of our spellcasters at Hex Publishers and movie-mages at the Colorado Festival of Horror. Please be advised that all emergency exits have been locked for this special nostalgia-curdled premiere of death. From crinkling celluloid to ferocious flesh—from the silver screen to your hammering heart—behold as a swarm of werewolves, serial killers, Satanists, Elder Gods, aliens, ghosts, and unclassifiable monsters are loosed upon your auditorium. Relax, and allow our ushers to help with your buckets of popcorn—and blood; your ticket stubs—and severed limbs; your comfort candy—and body bags. Kick back and scream as you settle into a fate worse than Hell. Tonight's director's cut is guaranteed to slash you apart. Edited by Joshua Viola Produced in collaboration with the Colorado Festival of Horror Cover art by AJ Nazzaro and Joshua Viola Story art by Xander Smith Header art by Aaron Lovett Contents: FOREWORD Bret and Jeanni Smith INTRODUCTION Paul Campion ALIEN PARASITES FROM OUTER SPACE Warren Hammond RETURN OF THE ALIEN PARASITES FROM OUTER SPACE Angie Hodapp NEGATIVE CREEP Alvaro Zinos-Amaro HELLULOID Dayton Ward and Kevin Dilmore RISE, YE VERMIN! Betty Rocksteady THE CRONENBERG CONCERTO Keith Ferrell CREATURE FEATURE Gary Jonas INVISIBLE Mario Acevedo SCREEN HAUNT Orrin Grey THE DEVIL'S REEL Sean Eads and Joshua Viola ON THE ROCKS K. Nicole Davis COMING ATTRACTIONS Stephen Graham Jones LATE SLEEPERS Steve Rasnic Tem SPECIAL MAKEUP Kevin J. Anderson

30 review for It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Char

    It took this anthology a while, but the final tales really delivered! As with any collection of stories, some hit the mark with me and some didn't. The ones that impacted me the most were: CREATURE FEATURE by Gary Jonas. This one was imaginative, mysterious, fun and scary all at once. INVISIBLE by Mario Acevedo. Serial killer at the drive-in. That's all I'm going to say. There were lots of twists with this one. THE DEVIL'S REEL by Sean Eads and Joshua Viola. The church-going community gets all rile It took this anthology a while, but the final tales really delivered! As with any collection of stories, some hit the mark with me and some didn't. The ones that impacted me the most were: CREATURE FEATURE by Gary Jonas. This one was imaginative, mysterious, fun and scary all at once. INVISIBLE by Mario Acevedo. Serial killer at the drive-in. That's all I'm going to say. There were lots of twists with this one. THE DEVIL'S REEL by Sean Eads and Joshua Viola. The church-going community gets all riled up over a new multiplex coming to town. Turns out they were right to be riled! COMING ATTRACTIONS by Stephen Graham Jones. What's behind that panel in the men's room where the trough used to be, before they replaced it with urinals? What happens at the old Winchester theater, when it's all closed up in the middle of the night, but there are lights flickering inside? You'll have to read this and see. LATE SLEEPERS by the legendary Steve Rasnic Tem. I'll admit it, I'm a HUGE fan of Tem's work and have been since I was in my early teens. This story is no exception. Welcome to Paradise Cinemas! This was my favorite story in the collection. SPECIAL MAKEUP by Kevin J. Anderson. What happens when the special effects makeup person is tired of an egomaniac of an actor and finally has had enough of his BS? Read this and find out. All of the authors in this collection have writing chops, as evidenced by quite the impressive list of accomplishments credited to each one of them in the CAST & CREW section. There is no doubt that all of these authors are qualified, it's just that their work didn't tickle me in the way I liked to be tickled. Your mileage may vary. There is also a section about the SPECIAL EFFECTS TEAM, crediting the illustrators whose work is featured in this volume. I enjoyed the graphics they provided. I wish NIGHT AT THE MULTIPLEX had more of a balance to it, which would have made the reading go a bit quicker for me, but overall it's a decent collection, one with a few final stories that blew me away before this appeared on the screen: *Thanks to the publisher, the authors and NetGalley for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This anthology is a love letter to horror films, particularly the spattery monster ones. If those are your jam, then you should check out this book. “Coming Attractions” by Stephen Graham Jones was compelling storytelling about a young teen adventure of sneaking into an old haunted movie theater and spending the night. “Late Sleepers” by Steve Rasnic Tem had a waking nightmare quality about it that is quite likely a disassociation event for our unreliable narrator. “Screen Haunt” by Orrin Grey d This anthology is a love letter to horror films, particularly the spattery monster ones. If those are your jam, then you should check out this book. “Coming Attractions” by Stephen Graham Jones was compelling storytelling about a young teen adventure of sneaking into an old haunted movie theater and spending the night. “Late Sleepers” by Steve Rasnic Tem had a waking nightmare quality about it that is quite likely a disassociation event for our unreliable narrator. “Screen Haunt” by Orrin Grey delivers everything I could want in a perfect Halloween story. I want to see someone do cosplay as the monsters from this story’s film. Also, this delivers the thesis statement for Orrin’s oeuvre as well as this book: “Movies don’t scare me,” I tell my therapist at our second or third session, when she asks me why I want to make scary movies. “They’re, like, the only things that don’t scare me. So, of course, I want them to.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This. Book. Was. AMAZING!!!!!!!! I grew up in the 80's, and boy oh boy, did these stories bring back the memories. They don't make them like this anymore. Sit down, Get comfortable. And sink your teeth in. You will be glad you did. Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher, and every single author that contributed to this short story anthology. You all made my day!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob/Sally

    Sadly, as much as I was looking forward to this - I lived 80s horror and worked at a run down video store during the VHS era - it just didn't work for me. I gave it 5 stories before abandoning it and none of them hooked me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Irene

    This was a fun read, with all of the stories sharing a theme of movie theaters or drive ins in the heyday of 80s classic cheesy horror films. There are aliens, serial killers, demons who steal souls through movies and then possess their victims, and more. Some of the stories were scary while others were more of a nostalgic and campy good time. As someone who grew up in the 80s spending most Friday nights at the drive in theater and most Saturday mornings in the video store poring through the new This was a fun read, with all of the stories sharing a theme of movie theaters or drive ins in the heyday of 80s classic cheesy horror films. There are aliens, serial killers, demons who steal souls through movies and then possess their victims, and more. Some of the stories were scary while others were more of a nostalgic and campy good time. As someone who grew up in the 80s spending most Friday nights at the drive in theater and most Saturday mornings in the video store poring through the new releases on VHS this was like a trip back in time to my youth. I received a complimentary copy for review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    JaeRavenClaw

    If you love and I do mean LOVE 80s horror movies like I do, get this book. Read this book and just let the nostalgia take you away like Calgon always promises to do. I could not have enjoyed a book more, I could not have devoured a book quicker. The homages to 80s horror movies in reference throughout this book just lit my little horror heart aflame. Anthologies can be hit or miss, book as well as movie, but It Came From The Multiplex is a complete hit in my opinion. "Invisible" had a great plot If you love and I do mean LOVE 80s horror movies like I do, get this book. Read this book and just let the nostalgia take you away like Calgon always promises to do. I could not have enjoyed a book more, I could not have devoured a book quicker. The homages to 80s horror movies in reference throughout this book just lit my little horror heart aflame. Anthologies can be hit or miss, book as well as movie, but It Came From The Multiplex is a complete hit in my opinion. "Invisible" had a great plot line, "Alien Parasites from Outer Space" gave me a Slither-like vibe, and "Special Makeup" made me laugh out loud in a good way. A little cheesy, a lot gory in places, and written with a ton of love to those that came before us in the horror industry. I can not thank Netgalley, Hex Publishers and the authors enough for allowing me to read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers is a themed anthology of 14 stories centered around the horrors of 80s cinema. On the whole, it never quite fully lives up to the promise or potential of this excellent premise, but there a few bright spots in an otherwise uneven collection. Warren Hammond and Angie Hodapp kick things off with their two-part double-feature, "Alien Parasites from Outer Space" and "Return of the Alien Parasites from Outer Space." While attending a drive-in screening It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers is a themed anthology of 14 stories centered around the horrors of 80s cinema. On the whole, it never quite fully lives up to the promise or potential of this excellent premise, but there a few bright spots in an otherwise uneven collection. Warren Hammond and Angie Hodapp kick things off with their two-part double-feature, "Alien Parasites from Outer Space" and "Return of the Alien Parasites from Outer Space." While attending a drive-in screening of the titular film, Carl Cramer begins to realize that the movie is not a lost Hollywood classic, but an actual, honest-to-goodness documentary disguised as a sci-fi horror flick, and that it's being shown by the drive-in owner as a way to warn its attendees of the threat of alien parasites. "Parasites" is reminiscent of '50s-era bug flicks, and while entertaining it's also about as straightforward as you can get. There's no real big surprises, twists, or last minute reveals to spin the narrative off into something noteworthy or truly compelling, but it's a decent enough ode to a bygone era of horror cinema. "Negative Creep" has a killer premise with a sound-based entity hunting down local teens, and has a very '80s teen horror movie aesthetic about it, reminding me a bit of Nightmare on Elm Street, only instead of having to stay awake in order to stay alive, these kids have to be surrounded by the noise of music and movies to ward off the supernatural threat. Alvaro Zinos-Amaro sure has come up with an incredibly sleek and cool idea here, but its latter half rushes to an end with a series of conveniences and hollow contrivances that left me skeptical. I think if it had been expanded into a novella and Zinos-Amaro had more room to really develop this story's themes and commentary on the proliferation of technology and the distraction of mobile devices (in this case, cassette players and stereo decks), it could really be quite an effective story. Here, it's just fair to middling. Of the more recognizable names contributing to this anthology, Betty Rocksteady was one I was most looking forward to. "Rise, Ye Vermin!" didn't disappoint, thankfully, and revolves a lesbian couple who plan to walk out on their jobs at the movie theater, only for one of them to end up kidnapped by the deranged manager. Rocksteady delivers a really fun narrative chockfull of squicky bugs, and, frankly, that's always entertaining. However, it's Keith Ferrell's "The Cronenberg Concerto" that I found to be the most welcome surprise here. I really dug this piece a lot - not just the mystery of the narrator's strange movie viewing ritual, but of what Ferrell has to say about nostalgia and the power of film through the eyes of our central figure here. Ferrell has a lot to say about the history of horror cinema and the way this genre and the movies themselves have evolved over the decades, all filtered through the concept of the "real" and how making horror films more accessible to general audiences has deprived them of their authenticity. It's a smart story, and it packs a nice punch, too. Stephen Graham Jones, as expected, serves up another of this anthology's best with his "Coming Attractions." A group of kids sneak into a theater and hide until after closing so they can explore the legitimacy of the legends of this haunted movie house. Jones's writing of these kids is on-point and authentic, and the climax is genuinely eerie. Good, too, is Steve Rasnic Tem's "Late Sleepers," which revolves around a movie theater closing up shop and sharing one last hurrah with its audience by screening a custom-made clip-show of past films exhibited there. Interspersed in this footage, though, are scenes of a house... a house very familiar to one particular audience member. There's a nice sense of mounting dread throughout this story, and then it takes a deliciously dark turn that I quite appreciated. Unfortunately, much of the stories contained within It Came from the Multiplex are pretty basic efforts. Perhaps it's fitting, then, that the book sputters to a finish with Kevin J. Anderson's "Special Makeup," a disappointingly cheesy and obvious note to end this collection on. Anderson tries to deliver a cautionary tale in the mold of a Tales from the Crypt segment, but it's about as effective and clumsily handled as something out Scary Tales to Tell in the Dark. Being concerned with the production of movie in the '50s, too, it doesn't jibe well with the overarching motif of '80s cinema and feels awfully dated. I can only imagine it's included here because the reprint rights must have been cheap to come by, but the anthology might have been better served by its exclusion. While I was initially excited and delighted by the potential offered at first blush by this book, it's ultimately hard to recommend given its imbalance in hits to misses. Most of the stories herein are decidedly OK, but only a few actually rise above these standards and attempt to provoke and engage its readers rather than merely being odes to a bygone era.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne

    You can view my video review here: https://youtu.be/VrH75r6dxi4 *I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* This was a fun collection of horror short stories that were themed around classic horror movies and the 80s. I would particularly recommend it to fans of old B-rated horror flicks, as that is the feel that the whole book gives off. In general, though, I would say that the quality of the stories in this anthology varies widely. Several of the stories felt quick and You can view my video review here: https://youtu.be/VrH75r6dxi4 *I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review* This was a fun collection of horror short stories that were themed around classic horror movies and the 80s. I would particularly recommend it to fans of old B-rated horror flicks, as that is the feel that the whole book gives off. In general, though, I would say that the quality of the stories in this anthology varies widely. Several of the stories felt quick and shallow and flashy with little depth or substance. I did not enjoy this particular brand of story as much, though I do think it was true to the theme of the book, as they felt a lot like the movies they featured. Unfortunately, several of the early stories in the book fall under this category, so if you've begun reading and aren't impressed, stick around; there are some hidden gems later on. There were also several stories which were okay--ones I may not remember a month or two from now but which felt more thought-out and had more depth. However, three stories in this anthology really stood out to me, and those are the ones I shall be talking about for the rest of this review. The Cronenberg Concerto by Keith Ferrell This story is probably the one that will stick with me the longest. It was much more character than plot with a delightfully disturbing reveal. While I did figure out where this one was going in advance, it proceeded like the proverbial train-wreck; I couldn't look away. Invisible by Mario Acevedo This was a great story for crime fiction lovers. Again, this story brought me deeper inside a character than most of the others in the collection, and I really appreciated the twist in the ending. Coming Attractions by Stephen Graham Jones Of the three stories I've selected to highlight here, this is definitely the most reminiscent of a classic horror plot. What makes this one stand out is the writing; it was by far the cleanest and best-written story of the anthology, and I found myself enthralled with it in a way I wished I could have been with many of the others. If you like old horror movies or just want to reminisce about the existence of drive-ins, I recommend checking out this collection.

  9. 4 out of 5

    D.K. Hundt

    3.5 Stars IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX—80s Midnight Chillers ’The stories in this anthology are a love letter to the 80s, the golden age of horror where blood and gore were faithfully rendered in 35mm Technicolor. It was a glorious time to experience film like RE-ANIMATOR, THE THING, HELLRAISER, THE LOST BOYS, PRINCE OF DARKNESS, CHILDREN OF THE CORN, and many, many more.’ My Favorites… ’The Cronenberg Concerto’ – by Keith Ferrell ’Creature Feature’ – by Gary Jonas ’Invisible’ – by Mario Acevedo 3.5 Stars IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX—80s Midnight Chillers ’The stories in this anthology are a love letter to the 80s, the golden age of horror where blood and gore were faithfully rendered in 35mm Technicolor. It was a glorious time to experience film like RE-ANIMATOR, THE THING, HELLRAISER, THE LOST BOYS, PRINCE OF DARKNESS, CHILDREN OF THE CORN, and many, many more.’ My Favorites… ’The Cronenberg Concerto’ – by Keith Ferrell ’Creature Feature’ – by Gary Jonas ’Invisible’ – by Mario Acevedo ’Screen Haunt’ – by Orrin Grey ’The Devil’s Reel’ – by Sean Eads and Joshua Viola ’On The Rocks’ – by K. Nicole Davis ’Coming Attractions’ – by Stephen Graham Jones ’Late Sleepers’ – by Steve Rasnic Tem ’Special Makeup’ – by Kevin J. Anderson Thank you, NetGalley and Hex Publishing, for loaning me an eGalley of IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    “Don’t say we’re just trying to capture the zeitgeist. We’ve been breathing it all along” (8). This anthology surrounds itself with the nostalgic environment of multiplexes and drive-ins aligned with cars filled with their own unique and grotesque horror stories wrapped up with a mesmerizing bloody bow on top. Each story melted into the next creating this timeless flow. The fact that this is not published in October also shows you the dedication of the authors displaying how much of an homage the “Don’t say we’re just trying to capture the zeitgeist. We’ve been breathing it all along” (8). This anthology surrounds itself with the nostalgic environment of multiplexes and drive-ins aligned with cars filled with their own unique and grotesque horror stories wrapped up with a mesmerizing bloody bow on top. Each story melted into the next creating this timeless flow. The fact that this is not published in October also shows you the dedication of the authors displaying how much of an homage the book is to the genre and it’s followers. “The stories in this anthology are a love letter to the 80’s, golden age of horror where blood and gore were faithfully rendered in 35mm Technicolor” (11). First, I have to applaud this book for it’s artwork. The reader may think they only get this stunning 80’s influenced horror film dedicated cover described in the preface as “...the right sort of artwork, something with eye-gouging, wait, eye-popping colors'' (9). Oh no, there is much more art submerged within the pages. Included inside are these gorgeous horror stencils that not only accommodate each story but also synchronize with the header flipbook artwork. “The projector pitches off its stand and crashes to the floor. With a crunch of breaking glass, the drive-in goes black” (50). The majority of these stories had my heart pumping and gripped by the throat gasping for air. Others had tropes that were expected to eventually appear, but done quite well. I admired the multiple creative usages of physical film reels incorporated in select stories in comparison to simply using a film within the story. “Alien Parasites From Outer Space” (Warren Hammond⁣ & Angie Hodapp⁣), “Helluloid” (Dayton Ward & Kevin Dilmore) and “Invisible” (Mario Acevedo) were my favorites from the collection. Also, Keith Ferrel’s “The Cronenberg Concert” had me submerged through the vivid word usage. Then, hit me with the horrifyingly grotesque. “... tendrils of celluloid flapping and twisting outward from the core of the shape’s bulk. Film reels hung from the ends of various strands” (95). While at first glance, one may believe this has a target audience. I would recommend this anthology to anyone. One can find fragments of comedy, mystery and magical realism alongside the main genre of nostalgic horror. “Christmas lights were hung, a glitter of brilliant white with the occasional splash of red. Everything else lay dark” (263). Thank you to NetGalley, Hex Publishers, the authors, and all contributors for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review..

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    trigger warning (view spoiler)[ racism, homophobia, gore, kidnapping, mutilation, self-mutilation, mental illness, trauma, use of the slur gypsy (hide spoiler)] Be prepared! In these short stories, you'll meet your worst nightmares. Or, you know, what 80-ies horror movies would suggest as your worst nightmares. Only enter the cinema if you're ready for mysterious creatures, horrible things, and well-loved tropes! The first two stories belong together, apart from that, all are standalones featuring trigger warning (view spoiler)[ racism, homophobia, gore, kidnapping, mutilation, self-mutilation, mental illness, trauma, use of the slur gypsy (hide spoiler)] Be prepared! In these short stories, you'll meet your worst nightmares. Or, you know, what 80-ies horror movies would suggest as your worst nightmares. Only enter the cinema if you're ready for mysterious creatures, horrible things, and well-loved tropes! The first two stories belong together, apart from that, all are standalones featuring movies in one kind or another. VHS tapes, cinema, shooting a movie - all these aspects of it are taking in to make up a red thread that's weaving through the anthology. At first, I had fun. It was nothing literary, but it was fun and remembered me quite a bit of the Fear Street series I used to love as a teen, but then the topics chosen by the authors got more and more problematic till we arrived at a gypsy curse. Listen, some tropes simply didn't age as well as others and racism is not cool. But I can tell you that it's exactly as trashy as cover and blurp lead you to suspect, so if you're ready for that, you'll not be disappointed. I recieved a copy of this book in exchange for a honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm a big lover of over the top, campy, b-movie horror flicks, this book is a super fun love letter to those movies. Even though not every story was a winner for me, none of them were bad, and I could enjoy their gory, often ridiculous nature. I found the longer I read the book, the more fun I had with it. Creature Feature, The Devil's Reel and Rise, Ye Vermin were my favorites. If you love 80's horror movies, and are hungry for a nostalgia trip, this is the book for you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie (That's What She Read)

    Here's the thing. Don't let my rating deter you if this is something that seems interesting to you. I was just 100% not the intended audience for this collection. If you're someone who genuinely enjoys over-the-top horror movies from the 80's, you can have fun with this. I just did not connect with it. I can see it being other people's jam though

  14. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Thank you to NetGalley and Hex Publishers for an e-arc of the book in exchange for an honest review. 5/5 stars. It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers is a blast from the past and more than I could have asked for as a fan of 80’s horror cinema. If, like me, you’re a fan of the old school “B” Horror movies, drive-ins, and slasher films this is definitely the book for you! The book contains an amazing collection of short stories about serial killers, ghosts, and all kinds of other ghouls Thank you to NetGalley and Hex Publishers for an e-arc of the book in exchange for an honest review. 5/5 stars. It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers is a blast from the past and more than I could have asked for as a fan of 80’s horror cinema. If, like me, you’re a fan of the old school “B” Horror movies, drive-ins, and slasher films this is definitely the book for you! The book contains an amazing collection of short stories about serial killers, ghosts, and all kinds of other ghouls waiting to come for you in the night (or while you’re watching your next horror flick). Every story is fun to read and full to twists that will keep you wanting more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melanie (TBR and Beyond)

    This honestly didn't work for me at all. I had pretty high hopes on this one - maybe because of the badass covers and that it promised a cool anthology about 80s horror movies - which is very my era. It was pretty much all a miss for me. A couple were kind of cool but nothing blew me away and I honestly already forget most of them. Some of them I found a little more leaning towards the 60s horror monsters than 80s horror monsters, but maybe that is just me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Horror Bookworm Reviews

    Horror Bookworm Reviews... It Came From The Multiplex: 80’s Midnight Chillers Who remembers making that exciting trip to your local cinema on behalf of those great horror movies of the 1980's. Maybe a trip to the huge Multiplex for a showing of Sleepaway Camp. Or how about a midnight showing of Killer Klowns From Outer Space at your local Rialto. Perhaps a drive-in double feature, The Evil Dead and Evil Dead 2. It Came From The Multiplex: 80’s Midnight Chillers is a horror anthology based on thes Horror Bookworm Reviews... It Came From The Multiplex: 80’s Midnight Chillers Who remembers making that exciting trip to your local cinema on behalf of those great horror movies of the 1980's. Maybe a trip to the huge Multiplex for a showing of Sleepaway Camp. Or how about a midnight showing of Killer Klowns From Outer Space at your local Rialto. Perhaps a drive-in double feature, The Evil Dead and Evil Dead 2. It Came From The Multiplex: 80’s Midnight Chillers is a horror anthology based on these scenarios brought to you by Hex Publishers. From a homicidal psychopathic serial killer that preys on drive-in movie goers, alien parasites from outer space attempting to reign over the human race and a haunted theater where an admit one ticket may allow you to enter, but never leave. This collection of authors assembled by Joshua Viola give a nod to the experience of viewing these third-rate B-Movies of the silver screen. With the likes of authors Stephen Graham Jones, Kevin J Anderson and Betty Rocksteady, this throwback to the 80's has plenty of authentic horror, blood and gore to excite the most enthusiastic ritualist. Written with extreme creativity and quick wit, the reader will appreciate the authors flow of darkness from story to story. For these reasons you should purchase a ticket, popcorn, candy, coke and this book. Grab a seat and wait for that familiar clickety-clack of the film projector as it lights up the silver screen. However, keep in mind this particular motion-picture screen is the window to many monstrous souls waiting to reveal each short story. Hex Publishers have released an enjoyable nostalgic anthology that readers will no doubt appreciate. 5 stars. For more recommendations visit https://horrorbookwormreviews.wordpre...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Giulia

    Crazy and Cheezy style horror served ala 80's style. If you like that stuff, you will enjoy this book. I liked it but I think this one will only go over really well with the really hardcore 80's horror fans. Thank you to Net Galley and the Publisher for a chance to read and review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Mcquiston

    I was looking forward to reading this anthology of 80s themed stories, and now that I am finished and have had a few hours to reflect, there are some things that this collection does well and some things it does not do well. One of the things that I really like is that most of the stories have one setting, most of them a movie theatre, and the authors do a great job in varying their stories told in this setting. It would be easy to have 15 stories about theatre hauntings, but there are only a fe I was looking forward to reading this anthology of 80s themed stories, and now that I am finished and have had a few hours to reflect, there are some things that this collection does well and some things it does not do well. One of the things that I really like is that most of the stories have one setting, most of them a movie theatre, and the authors do a great job in varying their stories told in this setting. It would be easy to have 15 stories about theatre hauntings, but there are only a few, and those few are really good ones. Many of these stories involve many different themes, from alien invasions to murders to crime cover ups, the variety kept me interested in the collection. I thought the art was very well done, and I have thought about getting a physical copy of this so that I could do the flipbook animation. One of the things that I did not like was that there was only one story that involved the multiplex, and this was in a story where they use the multiplex as a prop instead of a setting (where the kids saw a movie at the multiplex and did not come out the same.) The rest of the stories were set in old, one screen theatres and drive-ins. I know that it makes for great, and easier stories, but the idea of many of these stories being set in the 80s or being inspired by the 80s just does not come across very well. These stories seem to be more inspired by the drive-in movies from the 60s and 70s than the mall culture of the 80s.  This is not to say that the collection does not have some highlights. I really enjoyed the first two stories, “Alien Parasites from Outer Space” by Warren Hammond and “Return of the Alien Parasites from Outer Space” by Angie Hodapp, a alien story with a legitimate sequel as the next story. I have not seen this very often in anthologies, and the stories were fun so I was fully engaged in the plot with both of these stories. I did not know what I thought about Keith Ferrell’s story, “The Cronenberg Concerto” while I was reading it because it is written in a more passive, reflective way, but in hindsight, I think about this story more than most of the others. This is a quiet, body horror story, and it is more interesting in concept than it initially appears. The only story that involves a Multiplex, "The Devil's Reel" by Sean Eads and Joshua Viola is a great Satanic Panic story, which seems to capture the spirit that this collection felt like it was trying to gear toward. There are a few other pretty good stories, particularly Stephen Graham Jones and Steve Rasnic Tem, but there are not many that really stick out and make me think I’ll remember much about this anthology in six months. They are good stories, but not memorable. I know how hard it is to work on these types of anthologies, and if anyone wants to read it, I would not discourage it, but this is a soft recommendation from me. I received this as an ARC from the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Salome G

    The characters in these stories live different lives and live in different parts of the country. However, they're all connected by one thing: their relationship to movies and movie theaters. Sometimes it's the movies themselves that are important and sometimes, it's just the feeling of being in a theater or being in the audience. So while the stories are meant to be scary, there's also a kind of sadness to them. It's the pain of nostalgia. For one thing, they don't really make movies like these a The characters in these stories live different lives and live in different parts of the country. However, they're all connected by one thing: their relationship to movies and movie theaters. Sometimes it's the movies themselves that are important and sometimes, it's just the feeling of being in a theater or being in the audience. So while the stories are meant to be scary, there's also a kind of sadness to them. It's the pain of nostalgia. For one thing, they don't really make movies like these anymore, at least not in wide release. And for another, a lot of these theaters don't exist anymore, either. As Steve Rasnic Tem writes in "Late Sleepers," "Did you know in the 30s they called movie theaters dream palaces? They understood back then. We've just forgotten." Some of the stories revolve around scenes at drive-ins, for instance. Although they're still around, they obviously don't number as many as they once did. In reading these stories, I was reminded of something Emily VanDerWerff wrote about my favorite X-Files episode, "Home": ...it's both a sterling example of a certain kind of horror tale and a last gasp effort within the subgenre, a sort of sad farewell to a weird America that was rapidly smoothing itself out. The collection begins with Warren Hammond's "Alien Parasites from Outer Space," a story that continues in the second tale, Angie Hodapp's "Return of the Alien Parasites from Outer Space." Both stories follow an awkward teenage boy, as he suspects the alien parasite movie at the drive-in may be a true story. The sequel device could come off as clunky, but both Hammond and Hodapp work well together, and it's a fun story. Other stories invoke theater ghosts, real-life serial killers, and that good ol' 80s staple, demons and the specter of hell. As this is a collection of stories, from over a dozen authors, the quality within varies. However, I didn't hate or even really dislike any of the stories. I just connected more with some of them than I did with others. For personal, spoilery reasons, I think my favorite was K. Nicole Davis's "On the Rocks," in which a group of friends goes to Red Rocks to see a showing of The Howling. (In case you're unfamiliar, The Howling is a horror movie about a human terrorist who moves to a peaceful werewolf community and destroys it.) I also enjoyed the cosmic horror of Gary Jonas's "Creature Feature," as well as the atmospheric eeriness of Orrin Grey's "Screen Haunt." Coping with anxiety, the latter story's protagonist tells her therapist, "Movies don’t scare me. They’re, like, the only things that don’t scare me. So, of course, I want them to." Girl, same. Each of the stories can be read in a moment, gobbled down like a large popcorn. That's both a positive and a negative for the book. It's positive because if you don't like a story, just wait. Another's on the way. However, it's also a negative, because it lends each story--and the book as a whole--a slight feeling. As with inhaling that popcorn, it doesn't really stick to your ribs. Still, though, it's entertaining, and it's a good introduction to several horror authors you might not know.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allie Marini

    * I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review * This is more like a 3.5 star review. Much like the beloved Horror section of your local video rental store — they’re not all winners, but even the bad ones are gloriously bad. I’ll be honest, I saw the title on NetGalley and requested it thinking it was essays. It is short stories in the style of 80s horror. So keep in mind, some nights you rented Near Dark & were blown away & sometimes you rented The Love Butcher a * I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review * This is more like a 3.5 star review. Much like the beloved Horror section of your local video rental store — they’re not all winners, but even the bad ones are gloriously bad. I’ll be honest, I saw the title on NetGalley and requested it thinking it was essays. It is short stories in the style of 80s horror. So keep in mind, some nights you rented Near Dark & were blown away & sometimes you rented The Love Butcher and were like “??? WTF ??” Cover art — 5 stars, I would have rented this video, or hoped that my babysitter in 1986 rented it. 5 star stories: “Coming Attractions”, Stephen Graham Jones — I wish this had been the last story in the collection, because those closing sentences would have been the best way to close out the collection. What a great story. “Screen Haunt”, Orrin Grey — Creepy, atmospheric, and also has a taut emotional cord that runs from the opening sentence and ties neatly and naturally into the closing line. “Late Sleepers” , Steve Rasnic Tem — Weird, eerie, and with just a touch of the opening to Midsommer in its ethereal quality. *** I wouldn’t call “Invisible” a 5 star story in a category with the above mentioned standouts, but it has a deeply satisfying ending. “Creature Feature” started strong but the silliness at the end (which, sigh, is very attuned to 80s horror, so hard to say if that was intentional or not) lost me & made the story less satisfying. Likewise, “On The Rocks” had a weak start but a great ending. “Cronenberg Concerto”, “Devils Reel”, and “Special Makeup” were middle of the pack. Enjoyable while I read them but nothing I’ll remember or think about in a month, whereas Screen Haunt, Late Sleepers, and Coming Attractions will stay with me a while. There’s some horribly cheesy dialogue — again, hard to say if this is poor writing or intentionally reflecting the feel of 80s horror, which is full of terrible dialogue. There’s also some cringe-y instances of “men writing women” (they really just don’t get how periods work, do they?) but here again: having not read anything else by those authors, I can’t say if it’s bad writing or “bad-on-purpose” writing, because no one in 80s horror knew how periods worked, either. Overall, it was a fun read and the 3-star review is a POSITIVE 3 star review because sure, there are better horror anthologies out there. But they may not be as fun, schlocky, or nostalgic as this one. I’d give this to horror-con buddies for sure. The only thing this book was missing was a Joe Bob Briggs tally at the beginning. 3 stars, Allie says, Check It Out.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX was a super fun book that had my nostalgia feelings all a tingle. I couldn’t help but be immediately sucked in by that cover. Look at it. Isn’t it fantastic? While I was never super into the B-movie level creature features that were just dripping in gouda, I appreciated the level of fun that some of these stories wished to recreate here because, let’s face it: they just don’t make movies like these anymore. I also liked how everything centered around the super grimy mov IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX was a super fun book that had my nostalgia feelings all a tingle. I couldn’t help but be immediately sucked in by that cover. Look at it. Isn’t it fantastic? While I was never super into the B-movie level creature features that were just dripping in gouda, I appreciated the level of fun that some of these stories wished to recreate here because, let’s face it: they just don’t make movies like these anymore. I also liked how everything centered around the super grimy movie theater of years past. As an adult now I pretty much won’t go to anything other than an Alamo Drafthouse, although I certainly remember those discount theaters where you were thankful the lights weren’t fully up because you just didn’t want to know what could potentially be all over your seat. And what the hell did you just step in? Anyone else’s LA Gears get spot-welded to the floor if you kept them in place for too long? No? Just me? So yeah. I totally get it. On of my favorites was The Devil’s Reel, simply because I’m a sucker for Christianity vs the devil type stories and how those whacky plots can go so terribly wrong. I also liked the one about keeping the Old Ones in check in an old movie theater. I think that one was Creature Feature. Special Makeup was a good one too. I thought it was really unique and I liked how it was set in 1950s (I think) Hollywood. I was totally in the mood for something like IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX and I was not disappointed. It has that certain level of kitsch that pokes the nostalgia button while at the same time still being a little on the creepy side too. I liked it. I liked it a lot. 4.5 I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jao Wonders

    80'𝙨 𝙃𝙤𝙧𝙧𝙤𝙧 𝙉𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙜𝙞𝙖⁣ ⁣ **I requested and received a copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**⁣ ⁣ It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers⁣ ⁣ EDITED BY JOSHUA VIOLA ; ILLUSTRATED BY XANDER SMITH & AJ NAZARRO⁣ RELEASE DATE: SEPT. 15, 2020⁣ My thoughts:⁣ First of all, I love the concept. If you're someone who love vintage Horror movies, especially from the 80's, then you'll definitely enjoy this one. Personally, I have zero knowledge about it, but I've been meaning to start w 80'𝙨 𝙃𝙤𝙧𝙧𝙤𝙧 𝙉𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙜𝙞𝙖⁣ ⁣ **I requested and received a copy of this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**⁣ ⁣ It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers⁣ ⁣ EDITED BY JOSHUA VIOLA ; ILLUSTRATED BY XANDER SMITH & AJ NAZARRO⁣ RELEASE DATE: SEPT. 15, 2020⁣ My thoughts:⁣ First of all, I love the concept. If you're someone who love vintage Horror movies, especially from the 80's, then you'll definitely enjoy this one. Personally, I have zero knowledge about it, but I've been meaning to start watching them this year and so, I thought, here's a great collection to start with, as an appetizer. I did enjoy it, don't get me wrong, especially the first couple of stories, but the second half were lackluster, I think. ⁣ ⁣ My favorite stories from the collection are:⁣ 🎥 Alien Parasites From Outer Space by Warren Hammond⁣ 🎞️ Return of the Alien Parasites From Outer Space by Angie Hodapp⁣ 🎥 Rise, Ye Vermin! by Betty Rocksteady⁣ 🎞️ The Cronenberg Concerto by Keith Ferrel⁣ 🎥 Creature Feature by Gary Jonas⁣ 🎞️ Negative Creep by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro⁣ ⁣ There are 14 short stories from this collection, so go ahead and give it a go!⁣ ⁣ http://thebookrebellion.art.blog/2020...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda (The Book Geek Boutique)

    When I saw this anthology on Netgalley I thought 'now that's a piece of me'. I love all things 80's horror movie related and this book promised to transport me to a time of old fashioned movie theatres, slashers and gore. However, these stories did not live up to that promise and I'm bummed out about it. An anthology in my opinion should start with one of its strongest stories, that way the mood is set early on and you know you're in for a good time. Unfortunately this particular anthology decide When I saw this anthology on Netgalley I thought 'now that's a piece of me'. I love all things 80's horror movie related and this book promised to transport me to a time of old fashioned movie theatres, slashers and gore. However, these stories did not live up to that promise and I'm bummed out about it. An anthology in my opinion should start with one of its strongest stories, that way the mood is set early on and you know you're in for a good time. Unfortunately this particular anthology decided to start with it's weakest story and this was the case for the next 2 or 3 stories too. Around the 40% mark things took a turn and there were a few stories that grabbed my attention but still didn't blow me away and by the end I was kind of glad it was all over. The gore wasn't spectacular, the horror wasn't impressive and there were too many stories in this anthology. I know that sounds a strange thing to say but I would have preferred fewer stories that were longer so the authors had more time to explore the themes they were paying homage to. The one thing I did enjoy was all the nods to the movies I love, Nightmare On Elm Street, The Evil Dead, Friday 13th. I wish they had have made more of the nostalgia though. So all in all, an excellent premise that was poorly executed. Such a shame.

  24. 4 out of 5

    thereadingowlvina (Elvina Ulrich)

    Ah, the fun 80s! I grew up in the 80s! Extreme fashion, VHS, walkman, Bon Jovi, Duran Duran, multiplexes and 80s horror movies! There is just something so nostalgic about the 80s. So when I see a book that says 80s Midnight Chillers, I knew I had to read it! This is definitely one fun, spine-tingling, horror anthology! From bugs and aliens to ghosts, there are fourteen stories themed after 80s horror movies in this book. Just like any anthology, some stories stood out while others were just okay Ah, the fun 80s! I grew up in the 80s! Extreme fashion, VHS, walkman, Bon Jovi, Duran Duran, multiplexes and 80s horror movies! There is just something so nostalgic about the 80s. So when I see a book that says 80s Midnight Chillers, I knew I had to read it! This is definitely one fun, spine-tingling, horror anthology! From bugs and aliens to ghosts, there are fourteen stories themed after 80s horror movies in this book. Just like any anthology, some stories stood out while others were just okay. Some stories were scarier with blood and gore while others were somewhat predictable and cheesy. It is like watching the Creepshow movie. Overall, this is one entertaining read. I love the cover! So 80s and definitely gives me the Stranger Things vibes here. ***Thank you Hex Publishers and NetGalley for this gifted review copy in exchange for an honest review.***

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bauer

    "It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers" is an excellent example of a themed anthology. Each short work in the collection was unique and written with a distinct voice such that none of the stories became muddled. There were some truly standout works as well. Most impressive was how closely each short piece adhered to the theme, sense of time and slight sense of camp which was a hallmark of 80's horror. While there was a broad spectrum of topic and focus, each work was of high quality "It Came from the Multiplex: 80s Midnight Chillers" is an excellent example of a themed anthology. Each short work in the collection was unique and written with a distinct voice such that none of the stories became muddled. There were some truly standout works as well. Most impressive was how closely each short piece adhered to the theme, sense of time and slight sense of camp which was a hallmark of 80's horror. While there was a broad spectrum of topic and focus, each work was of high quality writing. No tropes or overdone cliches except as actual meta components of the work itself. Of course, in every anthology there will be some works which stand out; in this case the final four or five tales were truly noteworthy and remarkable - the authors of each are well established in the field of speculative fiction. If you're a fan of horror, in general, and grew up on the horror fare of 70s and 80's this is a collection you won't want to miss.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chantale Canadian Book Addict

    I don’t read books like this often but I was in the mood for something different . I am so happy I read this because I have loved every minute of this hell of a ride. You love 80’s horror movies like I do then I think you will want to read this one. I love this anthology so much. I will be wanting to read this again in the future and I would just love to get my hands on a physical copy of this. I recommend .

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brian Mcclain

    A great collection of horror stories themed after horror movies of the 80s. They were entertaining and definitely scratched that horror itch. I didn't find any that brought the collection down. Recommended. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janessa

    I was so excited for this one and pre-ordered it on my kindle as soon as I saw it on some people's TBR's. I adore old-school, B-movie horror. But I really was not a fan of the majority of these stories. A lot of reviewers enjoyed this book, but nearly all of the stories, I found myself just saying aloud "What?" or "That's it?" Love that cover, though.

  29. 4 out of 5

    lucyreads_

    IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX is a collection of short stories that are written based off of a love of classic 80's horror movies. this collection got off to a rocky start for me as the first few stories didn't really take my interest but once I got past the first five I definitely felt my interest peak. my stand outs were definitely Coming Attractions and Late Sleepers, both of which I loved!! I also really enjoyed Creature Feature, The Cronenberg Concerto and On the Rocks overall this one was a mi IT CAME FROM THE MULTIPLEX is a collection of short stories that are written based off of a love of classic 80's horror movies. this collection got off to a rocky start for me as the first few stories didn't really take my interest but once I got past the first five I definitely felt my interest peak. my stand outs were definitely Coming Attractions and Late Sleepers, both of which I loved!! I also really enjoyed Creature Feature, The Cronenberg Concerto and On the Rocks overall this one was a mixed bag for me but I had a lot of fun reading it and found some stories I loved. I'd especially recommend this one for those who love classic horror films!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joe Jones

    This is a collection of stories that perfectly captures the feel of 80's horror movies/books! If you are a fan of that time this is a must read.

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