Hot Best Seller

John Constantine, Hellblazer Vol. 1: Marks of Woe

Availability: Ready to download

John Constantine is back in London, back to his old tricks and just in time, as things have become very dark indeed in his old stomping grounds. A small-time gang lord has found himself dealing with a big-time outbreak of supernatural weirdness and, without any allies to call on and nothing left to call his own, John doesn t have much choice about taking a paycheck from on John Constantine is back in London, back to his old tricks and just in time, as things have become very dark indeed in his old stomping grounds. A small-time gang lord has found himself dealing with a big-time outbreak of supernatural weirdness and, without any allies to call on and nothing left to call his own, John doesn t have much choice about taking a paycheck from one of London s worst, or accepting the help of one of the gang lord s would-be foot soldiers. But what should be an open-and-shut exorcism turns out to be nothing but and madness is just getting started! The original Constantine is back in this series from Si Spurrier (The Dreaming) and Aaron Campbell (Infidel), with nothing to his name but decades of bad memories and an unearned second chance. How, exactly, will he squander it? There s only one way to find out


Compare

John Constantine is back in London, back to his old tricks and just in time, as things have become very dark indeed in his old stomping grounds. A small-time gang lord has found himself dealing with a big-time outbreak of supernatural weirdness and, without any allies to call on and nothing left to call his own, John doesn t have much choice about taking a paycheck from on John Constantine is back in London, back to his old tricks and just in time, as things have become very dark indeed in his old stomping grounds. A small-time gang lord has found himself dealing with a big-time outbreak of supernatural weirdness and, without any allies to call on and nothing left to call his own, John doesn t have much choice about taking a paycheck from one of London s worst, or accepting the help of one of the gang lord s would-be foot soldiers. But what should be an open-and-shut exorcism turns out to be nothing but and madness is just getting started! The original Constantine is back in this series from Si Spurrier (The Dreaming) and Aaron Campbell (Infidel), with nothing to his name but decades of bad memories and an unearned second chance. How, exactly, will he squander it? There s only one way to find out

30 review for John Constantine, Hellblazer Vol. 1: Marks of Woe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Spurrier starts off the series by ignoring all of the New 52 and Rebirth versions of Hellblazer. For some unexplained reason John is in an apocalyptic future caused by a mad, adult Tim Hunter. Constantine makes a deal and gets sent back to 2019 where he has been gone for years (again, for some unexplained reason). Spurrier wipes away all of Constantine's old buddies like Chas setting up a new supporting cast over the first 6 issues. The first 3 issues have Constantine working with a small potato Spurrier starts off the series by ignoring all of the New 52 and Rebirth versions of Hellblazer. For some unexplained reason John is in an apocalyptic future caused by a mad, adult Tim Hunter. Constantine makes a deal and gets sent back to 2019 where he has been gone for years (again, for some unexplained reason). Spurrier wipes away all of Constantine's old buddies like Chas setting up a new supporting cast over the first 6 issues. The first 3 issues have Constantine working with a small potatoes gang who are being attacked by angels. Spurrier gets goofy with the second arc, having a hipster millennial wizard show up to bother Constantine. Matias Bergara's art was way too cartoony for Hellblazer. It also completely lacked backgrounds which I find very lazy. I'm not a fan of Aaron Campbell's art. He often draws way too many lines leaving the art really dark. His magic special effects look like scribbles on the page. I have no idea in those panels what I'm looking at.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Hellblazer returns to its R rated Roots while going under the Sandman Universe Umbrella. But is it good? Simon Spurrier decides to basically have our boy Constantine say "Fuck the last few years of my stories, they don't count" and you know what? I'm very okay with that. I read New 52 Constantine and holy fucking shit people, that was horrible. This is deep into the dark, twisted, and screwed up world of John and Spurrier gets it. The story starts off weird with events happening out of order but Hellblazer returns to its R rated Roots while going under the Sandman Universe Umbrella. But is it good? Simon Spurrier decides to basically have our boy Constantine say "Fuck the last few years of my stories, they don't count" and you know what? I'm very okay with that. I read New 52 Constantine and holy fucking shit people, that was horrible. This is deep into the dark, twisted, and screwed up world of John and Spurrier gets it. The story starts off weird with events happening out of order but once we get into the main story where it focuses on individual stories we have John dealing with gangs, a new age of people who uses magic but not very skilled at it, and a vicious spirit sucking the soul out of people in a hospital. These are the dark, twisted, and grimy tales I like out of my Hellblazer stories. Saying that, there is some negatives. I think the art change between stories is DRASTIC and hard to get used to at points. I also think the main villain, won't spoil it, is kind of cheesy in the fact it's someone very close to John. Also, I think it's a bit hard to understand all the slang, sometimes I have to re-read things. Saying that I was pretty engrossed the whole time. Laughed, horrified, and amazed this is what Hellblazer should have been for the last 8 years. A great start, so sad it got canned already at issue 12. A 4 out of 5.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Simon Spurrier takes over the title he was born to write and turns out eight issues of absolute brilliance as he grabs hold of poor John Constantine and drags him into insanity after insanity. First off, Spurrier clears up the New 52/Rebirth Constantine continuity by basically saying 'who fucking cares' and throwing it all out the window in the one-shot, while also exploring who John is and why he's literally his own worst enemy for a fantastic cliffhanger ending that leads into the main series w Simon Spurrier takes over the title he was born to write and turns out eight issues of absolute brilliance as he grabs hold of poor John Constantine and drags him into insanity after insanity. First off, Spurrier clears up the New 52/Rebirth Constantine continuity by basically saying 'who fucking cares' and throwing it all out the window in the one-shot, while also exploring who John is and why he's literally his own worst enemy for a fantastic cliffhanger ending that leads into the main series wonderfully. But first we get an issue of Books Of Magic in which John turns up to try and help-slash-kill Tim Hunter, because the best person to help a fledgling magician is obviously Constantine. This one's mostly filler, but it's such distinct Spurrier-voice that I'm super glad it was included here. Then we get six issues of the main series, which are absolutely fantastic as well. We open on some typical gang behaviour that evolves into the existential existence of angels, before John meets his Nu-Age replacement, rounding off with a one-shot story about a hospital which is spinechillingly good. This entire volume is just pure gold. Spurrier's character work and dialogue is perfect for John; there's a reason English writers are the ones that get John the best, and Spurrier's got to be the best fit in years. The artwork, from Aaron Campbell, Marcio Takara, and Spurrier's Coda collaborator Mattias Bergara, is also as close to a Vertigo feeling as you're ever going to get these days. This is the Constantine solo book we've needed since the original Hellblazer run ended. What? It's cancelled? MOTHERFUCK-

  4. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    actual rating: 3.5 This volume got off to a bit of a slow start with the first arc - or maybe I just don't know enough of this specific brand of British slang to muddle through it - but it picked up with the last three issues and I found myself really enjoying it by the end. Got burnt out on Hellblazer a few years ago trying to get through all the backlog but I'm interested to see what direction this new series goes. Pictured: two bisexual wizard morons getting wasted actual rating: 3.5 This volume got off to a bit of a slow start with the first arc - or maybe I just don't know enough of this specific brand of British slang to muddle through it - but it picked up with the last three issues and I found myself really enjoying it by the end. Got burnt out on Hellblazer a few years ago trying to get through all the backlog but I'm interested to see what direction this new series goes. Pictured: two bisexual wizard morons getting wasted

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    I have read some Hellblazer prior, but I wouldn’t call myself a fan, let alone an expert as I'm more familiar with the adaptations from films to TV that featured the Liverpudlian street magician John Constantine. Originally Vertigo's longest running title, the series concluded and was replaced Constantine, which rebooted Constantine for the New 52, a move that upset the fanbase that aged with the character. As DC launched the Sandman Universe with a line-up of comic books that explored the dark I have read some Hellblazer prior, but I wouldn’t call myself a fan, let alone an expert as I'm more familiar with the adaptations from films to TV that featured the Liverpudlian street magician John Constantine. Originally Vertigo's longest running title, the series concluded and was replaced Constantine, which rebooted Constantine for the New 52, a move that upset the fanbase that aged with the character. As DC launched the Sandman Universe with a line-up of comic books that explored the dark fantasy within the DC lore, John Constantine went through another relaunch where he reclaims the title of Hellblazer. How do you begin this long-awaited return? You begin with the end of the world as The Sandman Universe Presents: Hellblazer #1 shows an older and evil Tim Hunter reigns supernatural destruction upon the Earth whilst Constantine loses everyone and everything he knows and fears for his impending fate. However, when he is approached by an older version of himself, Constantine gets a second lease on life as he is transported to an alternate reality with the chance of being a better version of himself. Transitioning from an apocalyptic future to the present-day 2019 where Constantine feels like a fish-out-of-water, writer Simon Spurrier acknowledges previous continuities, whilst setting up a new stage of the street magician, such as existing in a new reality and can he go beyond his cynical nature? A common criticism I have towards the DC Relaunch line-up is how conflicted the numerous titles can be by trying to be both new and familiar. However, throughout this volume, being old and new works in the urban fantasy surroundings that can be relevant to the issues of today, whilst Constantine can still be defined by his biting personality. Much of this issue is nightmarish and it helps that artist Marcio Takara presents a visually striking apocalypse. Following a fun Books of Magic issue that Spurrier co-wrote with that series’ writer Kat Howard – in which Constantine confronts the younger Tim Hunter with a test about the latter’s morality – we then proceed with Constantine’s new solo series. The first three issues are about Constantine being forced to help a small-time gang boss whose crew is being shredded by supernatural entities. Right from the start, with its gritty London streets and dark tone (immediately established by artist Aaron Campbell), this feels like classic Hellblazer, where Constantine can be potty-mouthed and cynical, whilst there is nothing clean about the supporting cast and yet they are so engaging. In the next two issues, Spurrier lightens the mood when Constantine has to contend with the adoration of a new mage in town named Tommy Willowtree. Although this continues the ongoing conspiracy of the title, this arc is more driven with a comedic tone as it’s basically a buddy-up between the bitter magician and the optimistic mage, confronting the likes of vulgar ravens and poo-made monsters. With moments of humour, Matías Bergara’s artwork and Jordie Bellaire’s colours present a bright palette to the environments, which adds to the slapstick moments such as Constantine and Willowtree drinking more than ten pints and see which one pukes first. The final issue ends the volume on a truly high note by showcasing Noah – who was introduced in the first issue and seems to be the new Chas for this series – as he witnesses an evil that is killing patients in the hospital where his mother is also a patient at. The recurring theme throughout this volume is hatred and how it is manifested through a supernatural entity, drawn to such horrific fashion by Aaron Campbell, who has proven his horror credentials with Infidel a couple of years ago. The sad thing about this comic is that DC cancelled it, despite being a return-to-form for a beloved creation that had been absent for most of the last decade. Whilst we wait for the next volume, which will cover the final six issues, Spurrier and Co present something really special with the true John Constantine.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    The fourth attempt at reviving John Constantine since Hellblazer proper was cancelled, and definitely the best. Spurrier's affinity with untrustworthy leads always seemed like a good match for John, but I was still wary enough of modern DC's reverse Midas touch that I didn't pick this up in singles, and before this first collection was even out the series' cancellation was announced. Yes, I could blame myself, but blaming the shortsightedness of a major publishing corporation who still don't kno The fourth attempt at reviving John Constantine since Hellblazer proper was cancelled, and definitely the best. Spurrier's affinity with untrustworthy leads always seemed like a good match for John, but I was still wary enough of modern DC's reverse Midas touch that I didn't pick this up in singles, and before this first collection was even out the series' cancellation was announced. Yes, I could blame myself, but blaming the shortsightedness of a major publishing corporation who still don't know which books will sell better as trades seems a little fairer, not to mention a lot more WWJD. J standing for this JC, obviously. And oh boy, it might sound tautologous, but after all those versions who'd been tweaked and denatured to various extents, this JC really is this JC again. The opening pages take us to the occult apocalypse from the original Books Of Magic, and from there weave a lightning web off so many of the character's key anchor points, from Kit to his opening line, yet also spinning off to even acknowledge things it would have been much easier to forget, like the Keanu version. Anyone with Google can do continuity wank nowadays, of course, but the trick is doing it well, making something which doesn't just feel like a checklist of nods for the heads, and that is here too – whether it be new material ("wannabe-Slytherin cunts!") or just Spurrier finding an emotionally satisfying internal logic which lets him say, yes, I know the character's past, and it matters, but I can't and won't commit to treating it all as sacrosanct because that's not how you make magic. (The downside to all this, admittedly, and the main thing which makes me feel a glimmer of understanding for the cancellation, is that while the first issue is absolutely a restatement of principles, it's one which relies on at least a glancing familiarity with the character. This is not All-Star Superman, with its opening three-page statement of why Superman matters. If you came to this cold, you'd have a miserable old bastard wandering through some scenes of carnage getting people killed, and I couldn't entirely blame you for not sticking around when the world is amply supplied with those anyway) That's followed by a crossover appearance in the new Books Of Magic series, which I suppose was a necessary bridge but didn't convince me any better than the rest I've read of that run. Thereafter, though, we're on to the new Hellblazer proper, and even more so than the bravura opening, this was where it hit me: this feels like a Vertigo book. Yeah, the logo on the cover may say Black Label, but the evocative murkiness of Aaron Campbell's art, the heft of the volume, even the texture of the paper – they just add up to a haptic suggestion of being home. Not that the story, with hopeless lives getting caught up in dark magic, isn't doing its share of lifting too. Hell, there's even an identifiable member of the British establishment engaging in murderous sex crimes, and somehow the context has me excitedly thinking 'Royal Blood!' instead of wearily sighing that these stories don't work as fiction anymore in an age where people seriously believe in QAnon. As the titles A Green And Pleasant Land and Marks Of Woe suggest, a key influence here is Blake - a natural match, being another anti-authoritarian London gutter-mage, but not one I recall Hellblazer going too long on before, and so another instance in which the run manages to feel like it's respecting the mythos while also organically and sensitively expanding it. After the power of that, the two-part Scrubbing Up comes across as trying a little too hard. Jordie Bellaire is still colouring, but goes for a much gentler palette on Matias Bergara's more lighthearted style. The tone feels oddly wonky, and while I often enjoy that, not least in other Spurrier work, here there were times when it just felt confused. John meets what initially seems to be a clueless magic groupie who doubles as a checklist of millennial cliches (he's a poly vegan with a man-bun who likes silly coffee!), but who's also quite good at magic, and who has been looking after London in John's absence. Now, I definitely recognise the idea that a cranky old bastard can be envious of the younger generation, while at the same time finding them ridiculous, but it still didn't quite cohere for me, and was probably the closest thing here to what I feared a new Hellblazer might be, a burlesque as much as a continuation. Finally, the one-shot Quiet, with Campbell back, bringing the darker mood with him. The whole volume is strung through with a notion of Brexit &c as a curse, but it's closest to the surface here, the story reifying an everyday English horror as supernatural manifestation in much the same way Delano, Smith or Morrison used Hellblazer to do. And if the collection as a whole isn't quite up there with Smith, or Ennis, or Moore, it's definitely ahead of huge chunks of the original like Carey, Macan and Jenkins. Level with Milligan, maybe? And definitely something I'd like to have seen develop further, because none of the big runs were strongest at their start. So of course it didn't stand a chance, because this is modern DC, and the 2020s, where nothing good does.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Jefferson

    Collected and read the individual issues (#1 one shot, #1-6) Outstanding. If you're a fan of the Delano Hellblazer, then you'll feel right at home, here. Constantine in 2020 feels just like Thatcher-era Constantine, with sharp anti-establishment writing and brutal, unexpected humour. After reading issue 6 (titled: Quiet), I can't help but feel overrun with excitement for this series. The whole thing was great, but that one issue (#6) stood head and shoulders above the rest. It's a contained story Collected and read the individual issues (#1 one shot, #1-6) Outstanding. If you're a fan of the Delano Hellblazer, then you'll feel right at home, here. Constantine in 2020 feels just like Thatcher-era Constantine, with sharp anti-establishment writing and brutal, unexpected humour. After reading issue 6 (titled: Quiet), I can't help but feel overrun with excitement for this series. The whole thing was great, but that one issue (#6) stood head and shoulders above the rest. It's a contained story, akin to Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean's 'Hold Me' (Issue 27), and it hits like a bat to the bread basket. If that doesn't get nominated for an Eisner, then there's something wrong in this world. Spectacular. Loved it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    Yessssss. Though it's a bit uneven, the bastard is back and it's just so much fun to read him trying to make sense of the modern world.

  9. 4 out of 5

    CJ Juntunen

    Okay, okay, I say this a lot, but this is seriously one of the BEST comics I’ve read in recent history. The writing is brilliant! The creators stick to the morally-gray true essence of Constantine while still pulling no punches about how Brexit is a movement full of fear-mongering white supremacy. British politics gets pushed aside in the mainstream comics industry, so it’s refreshing to see that it’s at the forefront of this story. I absolutely cannot wait for more!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Sienicki

    John Constantine, as we all loved him before DC axed the original Vertigo series and turned him into a PG13 team playing wizard shooting magic out of his butthole to save Green fucking Lantern, is back. I love this book with all my dark heart. Obviously DC already cancelled this series as well...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Brilliantly written and illustrated, and further confirmation that Spurrier is one of my favorite comic writers of the past several years. I’ve enjoyed Constantine’s cameos in a few recent-ish DC series and vaguely intend to check out some of his original Vertigo series at the fabled “some point,” but I’m really impressed at how effortlessly Spurrier brings Constantine back to post-Brexit England, acknowledging his past at times but largely starting from scratch so I don’t feel like I’m missing Brilliantly written and illustrated, and further confirmation that Spurrier is one of my favorite comic writers of the past several years. I’ve enjoyed Constantine’s cameos in a few recent-ish DC series and vaguely intend to check out some of his original Vertigo series at the fabled “some point,” but I’m really impressed at how effortlessly Spurrier brings Constantine back to post-Brexit England, acknowledging his past at times but largely starting from scratch so I don’t feel like I’m missing out on decades of obligatory exposition. Comic writers dropping in heavy literature references is a trope that almost always feels fumbled and pretentious to me, so I was really impressed at how well Spurrier includes Blake references in the opening few issues that feel integral to the story for both plot and character reasons. There’s lots of phantasmagorical spookiness that fits the Halloween season, but it doesn’t take itself too serious and it’s all very cleverly premised and resolved. The post-Brexit setting comments on a range of contemporary social issues (often tying them into the supernatural happenings) but never feels didactic or preachy. Along those lines, I’m impressed with its generally progressive outlook that still manages to playfully jab at some shallower sentiments with a friendly eye-roll (and without resorting to the middle-aged “both sides” cynicism of something like South Park or Grand Theft Auto’s tone). The writing is also just consistently very funny. And this is another book where even if the writing was mediocre, the art alone would be worth reading this. Aaron Campbell draws most of the issues with an appropriately dark and scratchy realism that’s attractive, and then Matias Bergara (from the equally great Coda!) teams up with Spurrier again for a 2 issue arc in the middle that’s visually bright and totally different but even more gorgeous to look at. Jordie Bellaire’s coloring for both artists is as great as ever, and even Aditya Bidikar’s lettering is distinctive and noteworthy; his presentation of a mute character’s dialogue through British Sign Language is intuitive and new to me, and all the spoken magic and invoked names are interestingly lettered too. I was sad when the TimeWarner restructuring resulted in this series getting cut to 12 issues since I’d heard great things about it and was waiting for this first trade; now that I’ve read it I’m even more disappointed that this will be cut so short. What a shame, but at least there’s one more volume after this to look forward to!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Finally, a way for me to get into John Constantine's character that doesn't feel like homework. I enjoyed the style of 90s Vertigo comics, but I don't have as much patience for their wordiness these days. Also glad to see Constantine back in his R-rated mode after a few years of DC toning him down to fit him in the broader DC universe. And I fucking love Aaron Campbell's art in horror(see also Infidel from Image Comics).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erik Carl son

    DC Comics makes another amazingly stupid move by cancelling this brilliant series

  14. 5 out of 5

    Artur Nowrot

    Excellent stuff. Angry and rooted simultaneously in the present moment and the national mythology of England.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Such an excellent return to form for the Laughing Magician. This run gets so much right, even in the filler issues. John’s lost plenty but starts out cultivating a new cast of people who will likely be abused while in his orbit. While there’s a genuine humor to this it doesn’t get lost or in the way of its signature grimness. Well balanced and still telling unique stories for a character that’s been around this long. Really love Spurrier’s take on John.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alberto González

    The great coming back of the great Constantine

  17. 5 out of 5

    RG

    I like Constantine as a character but just cant get into Spurrier as a writer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ferguson

    I grew up reading Hellblazer when I was a kid (probably shouldn’t have). DC has tried to reboot John Constantine half a dozen times, and all of them have been frankly piss-poor attempts. All you have to do is look at Justice League Dark to see what I mean. This is the first comic I’ve read since the early 2000s that really captures the spirit of the original Alan Moore run, using our shit talking main character as a means of understanding the darkness of magic, mystery, and human nature. The art I grew up reading Hellblazer when I was a kid (probably shouldn’t have). DC has tried to reboot John Constantine half a dozen times, and all of them have been frankly piss-poor attempts. All you have to do is look at Justice League Dark to see what I mean. This is the first comic I’ve read since the early 2000s that really captures the spirit of the original Alan Moore run, using our shit talking main character as a means of understanding the darkness of magic, mystery, and human nature. The art is great- full of gritty earth tones and thick lines-, the coloring and lettering a marvel, and the character designs are wonderful. The cultural commentary- so prevalent in the 90s run of Moore- is back with full force and the rising tides of nationalism, fear, and sexism (although you’ll never hear the word Brexit mentioned once) are squarely in their sights. While each individual issue stands incredibly on its own, the overarching narrative (fleshed out in the last 2 issues) hits like a sledgehammer. And similarly, the style it tackles these issues is much more in line with 90s Punk works like Trainspotting or Fight Club. This book will make you queasy. It pulls no punches on its visuals or the message they convey, and that can be disconcerting for some readers. It’s a shame it was cancelled after just 12 issues, but what an amazing 12 issues they were… only the good die young I guess.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    Now this was UTTERLY amazing! This was part of the new vertigo series and it really took me back to the 90s. First of all the PAPER was right. It was a graphic novel with many issues in it not just the 4 or so found in most paper thin DC graphic novels these days. So it looked, felt and even smelt right! The art was much better than most things in the 90s however, wonderful illustrations that added so much to the stories. The stories and the characters were all brilliant (ok with the exception of Now this was UTTERLY amazing! This was part of the new vertigo series and it really took me back to the 90s. First of all the PAPER was right. It was a graphic novel with many issues in it not just the 4 or so found in most paper thin DC graphic novels these days. So it looked, felt and even smelt right! The art was much better than most things in the 90s however, wonderful illustrations that added so much to the stories. The stories and the characters were all brilliant (ok with the exception of annoying hispter because he was just way too annoying) but it was the wonderfully perfect level of social commentary, occult, spooky horror and personality and consequences all rolled into one. The last story had me in floods of tears it was so sad and beautiful. Quite simply one of the best comics I've read in years. Read this one!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Bruso

    I love Constantine and was eagerly awaiting this new graphic novel, but it did not work for me. I was hoping for more character development in Constantine, maybe a boyfriend or that his bisexuality would be explored, which was promised by the creators. But that never materialized. However, I was invested in the character of Noah Ikumelo--interesting, amusing--and the last two stories in the batch, "Scrubbing" and "Quiet," were the collection's highlights. I hope volume two is stronger, richer, l I love Constantine and was eagerly awaiting this new graphic novel, but it did not work for me. I was hoping for more character development in Constantine, maybe a boyfriend or that his bisexuality would be explored, which was promised by the creators. But that never materialized. However, I was invested in the character of Noah Ikumelo--interesting, amusing--and the last two stories in the batch, "Scrubbing" and "Quiet," were the collection's highlights. I hope volume two is stronger, richer, less uneven. Here's an idea: Maybe Noah should get his own full-length graphic novel--or series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike Roberts

    I'm entirely new to the character, apart from a brief cameo in early Sandman, so this might have been a weird place to come in. For the first half I felt a little of a fish out of water, and the first half definitely seemed to be leaning back to whatever came before this run. But I enjoyed the last couple of stories a lot more, and they felt a lot more set in the current day. One issue in particular was hilarious, and was definitely the point which won me over enough for me to pre-order volume 2 I'm entirely new to the character, apart from a brief cameo in early Sandman, so this might have been a weird place to come in. For the first half I felt a little of a fish out of water, and the first half definitely seemed to be leaning back to whatever came before this run. But I enjoyed the last couple of stories a lot more, and they felt a lot more set in the current day. One issue in particular was hilarious, and was definitely the point which won me over enough for me to pre-order volume 2.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This was a little difficult to follow at some points, but I really liked the heart of it. Constantine is a fave and the fact that this was actively calling out racism/ableism/etc. is another bonus - it's so nice to see that old characters work in the modern day.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    Marcio Takara and Cris Peter are a match made in art heaven (or hell). By far my favourite Constantine Graphic Novel I've read so far. Marcio Takara and Cris Peter are a match made in art heaven (or hell). By far my favourite Constantine Graphic Novel I've read so far.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    DC Comics you will rue the day you decided not to renew this phenomenal comic run. Simon Spurrier and Co. poured their hearts and souls into this and it SHOWS. Definitely planning to write a more thorough review when I'm less overwhelmed.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Iain Hepburn

    Brilliant, and compelling.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elysa

    Dark stories with eye-catching art. I'm really interested to see where else the series will go.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Devowasright

    Fuck you DC for shutting this down.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Luke Le Fevre

    I’d argue this is worth it for issue 6 alone. The best single issue comic I read this year. Sadly the comic got cancelled so now could be the time to jump on and restart the series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Danny Zang

    Fantastic storytelling on all fronts. It’s an absolute tragedy that this was cancelled. And before this first volume even came out!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Best Constantine I’ve read in years.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.