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Falastin: A Cookbook

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FALASTIN is a love letter to Palestine, the land and its people; an evocative collection of over 110 unforgettable recipes and stories from the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, and Ottolenghi SIMPLE. Travelling through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank, Sami and Tara invite you to experience and enjoy un FALASTIN is a love letter to Palestine, the land and its people; an evocative collection of over 110 unforgettable recipes and stories from the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, and Ottolenghi SIMPLE. Travelling through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank, Sami and Tara invite you to experience and enjoy unparalleled access to Sami's homeland. As each region has its own distinct identity and tale to tell, there are endless new flavour combinations to discover. The food is the perfect mix of traditional and contemporary, with recipes that have been handed down through the generations and reworked for a modern home kitchen, alongside dishes that have been inspired by Sami and Tara's collaborations with producers and farmers throughout Palestine. With stunning food and travel photography plus stories from unheard Palestinian voices, this innovative cookbook will transport you to this rich and complex land. So get ready to laden your table with the most delicious of foods – from abundant salads, soups and wholesome grains to fluffy breads, easy one-pot dishes and perfumed sweet treats – here are simple feasts to be shared and everyday meals to be enjoyed. These are stunning Palestinian-inspired dishes that you will want to cook, eat, fall in love with and make your own.


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FALASTIN is a love letter to Palestine, the land and its people; an evocative collection of over 110 unforgettable recipes and stories from the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, and Ottolenghi SIMPLE. Travelling through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank, Sami and Tara invite you to experience and enjoy un FALASTIN is a love letter to Palestine, the land and its people; an evocative collection of over 110 unforgettable recipes and stories from the co-authors of Jerusalem and Ottolenghi: The Cookbook, and Ottolenghi SIMPLE. Travelling through Bethlehem, East Jerusalem, Nablus, Haifa, Akka, Nazareth, Galilee and the West Bank, Sami and Tara invite you to experience and enjoy unparalleled access to Sami's homeland. As each region has its own distinct identity and tale to tell, there are endless new flavour combinations to discover. The food is the perfect mix of traditional and contemporary, with recipes that have been handed down through the generations and reworked for a modern home kitchen, alongside dishes that have been inspired by Sami and Tara's collaborations with producers and farmers throughout Palestine. With stunning food and travel photography plus stories from unheard Palestinian voices, this innovative cookbook will transport you to this rich and complex land. So get ready to laden your table with the most delicious of foods – from abundant salads, soups and wholesome grains to fluffy breads, easy one-pot dishes and perfumed sweet treats – here are simple feasts to be shared and everyday meals to be enjoyed. These are stunning Palestinian-inspired dishes that you will want to cook, eat, fall in love with and make your own.

30 review for Falastin: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    What a beautiful, fascinating book! Beautiful pics of the food that can be made with the recipes in the book. Lots of different kinds of recipes of things I have never seen and eaten. Who can say they have eaten Palenstine food ever? Definitely going to try some of them. Worth every cent this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Apparently my reviews (and Goodreads profile) are causing people to nastily tell me that I am the funniest/most-stupid person on the planet. Life is too short without humour and YOU ARE ALL MEAN GIRLS. #mikedrop When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more toda Apparently my reviews (and Goodreads profile) are causing people to nastily tell me that I am the funniest/most-stupid person on the planet. Life is too short without humour and YOU ARE ALL MEAN GIRLS. #mikedrop When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I have played a zillion games of scrabble, done a zillion crosswords and I AM BORED!!!) I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Falastin is a soulful tour of Palestinian cookery today from Ottolenghi's Executive Chef Sami Tamimi, with 120 highly cookable recipes contextualized by his personal narrative of the Palestine he grew up in. The story of Palestine's food is really the story of its people. When the events of 1948 forced people from all the regions of Palestine together into one compressed land, recipes that were once closely guarded family secrets were shared and passed between different groups in an effort to ensure that they were not lost forever. In Falastin, Tamimi retraces the lineage and evolution of his country's cuisine, born of its agriculturally optimal geography, many distinct regional cooking traditions, and, ultimately, Palestinian cooks' ingenuity and resourcefulness as the country's foodways mingled and morphed. From the recipes of refugee-camp cooks to the home kitchens of Gaza and the mill of a master tahini maker, Tamimi teases out the vestiges of an ancient cuisine while recording the derivations of a dynamic cuisine and the stories of the people of Palestine--as told from the kitchen. This is a lovely cookbook that I have already pre-ordered for myself: it is full of fun, fresh recipes that are easy to make and are full of flavour and some very enjoyable stories.. Tahini and hummus are two of my favourite foods on the planet (with a dash of fair-trade-from-Palestine za'atar of course ) and these recipes here are going to be in heavy rotation this summer. The vegetarian recipes are also easy to add proteins of your choice to if that floats your boat - it is a very versatile cookbook that deserves a read, if you are a lover of food as I am. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🥘🥘🥘🥘🥘 p.s. there are two links to Goodreads as I cannot get the books to com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie Al-Akhras

    I recently recieved this ARC cookbook at a "book buzz" and I fell in love immediately! The photos are tastefully designed and the recipes are simple and easy to follow. We are finding that we want to use the recipes on a weekly basis because they are healthy and they don't require all the rolling and stuffing that I traditionally assimilate with Arab cuisine. So far we have successfully made the chicken and za'atar, pita bread and the lamb shoulder shawarma. DELICIOUS!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    EJ

    Straight to the top of the list. A whole new taste experience and I reckon we'll be savouring these recipes for quite some time...prawns & tomato stew with coriander sauce; roasted aubergine with tamarind & coriander; sticky date & halva puddings with tahini caramel. Just fabulous. Straight to the top of the list. A whole new taste experience and I reckon we'll be savouring these recipes for quite some time...prawns & tomato stew with coriander sauce; roasted aubergine with tamarind & coriander; sticky date & halva puddings with tahini caramel. Just fabulous.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dovile

    Falastin is the first cooking book that I am reading cover to cover, not missing a page. It reads like a dream. This book is written with real busy, working home cooks in mind. All recipes have some advice on how to cook it ahead or how to play around with the ingredients. And the inclusion of stories of real people of Palestine is a beautiful touch. Very inspiring, informative and delicious book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michele Wyckoff

    A beautiful and delicious love letter to Palestinian cooking. Lots of vegetarian options as well.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rinette

    Brilliant cookbook!! Have made a recipe from it every day this week and cannot get enough..highly highly recommended!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Thanks Netgalley for the preview. Can't wait to order this for my library. This is for fans of Yotam Ottolenghi, great recipes and great people profiles.

  9. 4 out of 5

    JC Cornell

    Love all these recipes and can't wait to cook the whole book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laila Taji

    I literally (literally literally) ripped the foreward out of this book because it made me so angry. But other than that it is a lovely cook book with amazing pictures, a great mixture of simple and complex recipes. A keeper for sure!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shipshapeeatworthy

    As Yotam Ottolenghi indicates in his forward, Falastin (pronounced "fa-la-steen") picks up where his and Tamimi's Jerusalem left off 8 years ago. This time, Tamimi is joined by another from the Ottolenghi group, Tara Wigley (who co-authored Simple with Ottolenghi). What Falastin offers is a celebration of Palestinian cuisine -- dishes that Tamimi grew up with as well as other recipes most common to what other Palestinians experience growing up. Wigley's words take the home cook through their jou As Yotam Ottolenghi indicates in his forward, Falastin (pronounced "fa-la-steen") picks up where his and Tamimi's Jerusalem left off 8 years ago. This time, Tamimi is joined by another from the Ottolenghi group, Tara Wigley (who co-authored Simple with Ottolenghi). What Falastin offers is a celebration of Palestinian cuisine -- dishes that Tamimi grew up with as well as other recipes most common to what other Palestinians experience growing up. Wigley's words take the home cook through their journey -- "Recipes are like stories: events brought to life and shared in the making and the telling."(10) While the recipes in this book are gorgeously delicious, I find that the ingredients, people, and places profiled throughout Falastin give life to the recipes. Growing up in Canada, the way I learned about Palestine was through the nightly news, and, what Tamimi and Wigley present moves past these stories and images put forth by the media by offering poignant and hopeful stories of those who live both in, and beyond the headlines. The 120 recipes are organized into 9 chapters: Breakfast, Snacks, Spreads, & Sauces, Veggie Sides & Salads, Soups, Veggie Mains, Fish, Meat, Breads & Pastries, and Sweets. At the end of the book there is a glossary which offers information on the pantry items as well as Palestinian politics; while not exhaustive the authors aim to give a general idea of the terms used. Tamimi and Wigley have added short instructions to some of the recipe head notes -- Ingredient Notes, Getting Ahead, Playing Around, Keeping Notes -- in order to provide home cooks with more information for making the cooking task easier or for emphasizing information which the home cook may not be aware of. I appreciate when cookbook authors do this because the extra added information inevitably improves the outcome of my cooking! Cooking through Falastin I find joy in the recipes and, nourishment for my family. At times I would be in my kitchen cooking along from Falastin, other times I was curled up in my favourite chair reading through the stories and profiles. These parts of Falastin -- the ingredients, recipes and personal stories -- really demonstrate the connections between these elements and Palestinian identity. One of the messages in the book is that food is meant to be enjoyed and shared -- and, although this year has made it almost impossible to enjoy food during large family celebrations or gatherings, I have still used the opportunity to make, share, and enjoy food on a smaller scale. My daughter and I have made several recipes together -- her favourites are the Ka'ak Al Quds (Jerusalem Sesame Bread) and the Khubez (Pita Bread). Watching through the oven door as the baking pita puffs up with air is deeply satisfying and, if you're my daughter, there isn't anything more magical to witness. What I prize most is when recipes build flavours -- when I was making the Sesame Oat Crumble, I wondered how seemingly strong flavours like cardamom, peanut butter, rose water, olive oil, and honey would taste together. Enjoying the crumble with fruit and yogurt, the flavours aren't overpowering but balanced -- lightly sweet and salty, floral, nutty, and rich. Adding a generous drizzle of the Tahini-Date Syrup adds yet more layers to the flavouring. I also made use of the added step of pulsing the mixture in a food processor after it cooled from the oven, taking the texture from granola to crumble. Another recipe that relies on building layers of flavour (literally) is the Beet and Feta Galette w/ Za'atar and Honey. Chopped thyme and oregano is added to the galette pastry dough, then to the rolled out crust a layer of garlic mixed in ricotta is added, a sprinkle of feta, then a layer of caramelized onion, topped off with a layer of roasted, sliced beets. Many flavours that create such a deliciously rich filling -- I served slices of galette with a tossed green salad on the side, which made for a great summer meal! Since receiving a copy of Falastin for review at the end of June, I've found so many dishes that I've been making and re-making for my family. The Batata Bil Fil (Spicy Roasted New Potatoes w/ Lemon and Herbs) is one of our favourites -- this recipe is a combination of our two loves: roasted potatoes and roasted cherry tomatoes. Both are mixed with cumin seeds, thinly sliced garlic, coriander seeds, and thinly sliced red chile, then placed in the oven to slow roast. Once out of the oven, the tomatoes and potatoes are tossed with lemon juice and zest as well as chopped cilantro and dill. The juice from the roasted tomatoes combined with the citrus and herbs creates a tremendously good sauce which coats the vegetables. I could eat this dish every day! There are other dishes that evoke a similar response for me (mouth watering at the thought) -- such as the Shulbato (Bulgar, Tomato, and Eggplant Pilaf) and the Roasted Squash and Zucchini w/ Whipped Feta and Pistachios. Both recipes use oven-roasting to bring out smoky and sweet flavours of the eggplant, squash, and zucchini. And I've found these recipes make a wonderful lunchtime meal or light supper. Falastin shows the heart of Palestinian cuisine through ingredients, recipes, and the personal stories profiled throughout the book. Tamimi and Wigley offer an array of delicious recipes that have transported me from my home kitchen during this time spent at home. Please note that this review is an excerpt of a longer version posted to www.shipshapeeatworthy.wordpress.com I would like to take this opportunity to thank Appetite by Random House for providing me with a free, review copy of this book. I did not receive monetary compensation for my post, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Apparently my reviews (and Goodreads profile) are causing people to nastily tell me that I am the funniest/most-stupid person on the planet. Life is too short without humour and YOU ARE ALL MEAN GIRLS. #mikedrop When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more toda Apparently my reviews (and Goodreads profile) are causing people to nastily tell me that I am the funniest/most-stupid person on the planet. Life is too short without humour and YOU ARE ALL MEAN GIRLS. #mikedrop When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. (I have played a zillion games of scrabble, done a zillion crosswords and I AM BORED!!!) I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Falastin is a soulful tour of Palestinian cookery today from Ottolenghi's Executive Chef Sami Tamimi, with 120 highly cookable recipes contextualized by his personal narrative of the Palestine he grew up in. The story of Palestine's food is really the story of its people. When the events of 1948 forced people from all the regions of Palestine together into one compressed land, recipes that were once closely guarded family secrets were shared and passed between different groups in an effort to ensure that they were not lost forever. In Falastin, Tamimi retraces the lineage and evolution of his country's cuisine, born of its agriculturally optimal geography, many distinct regional cooking traditions, and, ultimately, Palestinian cooks' ingenuity and resourcefulness as the country's foodways mingled and morphed. From the recipes of refugee-camp cooks to the home kitchens of Gaza and the mill of a master tahini maker, Tamimi teases out the vestiges of an ancient cuisine while recording the derivations of a dynamic cuisine and the stories of the people of Palestine--as told from the kitchen. This is a lovely cookbook that I have already pre-ordered for myself: it is full of fun, fresh recipes that are easy to make and are full of flavour and some very enjoyable stories.. Tahini and hummus are two of my favourite foods on the planet (with a dash of fair-trade-from-Palestine za'atar of course ) and these recipes here are going to be in heavy rotation this summer. The vegetarian recipes are also easy to add proteins of your choice to if that floats your boat - it is a very versatile cookbook that deserves a read, if you are a lover of food as I am. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🥘🥘🥘🥘🥘 p.s. there are two links to Goodreads as I cannot get the books to com

  13. 5 out of 5

    A Kane

    I waited quite a bit to buy this book and am now wondering how many amazing meals I could have had if I hadn't. I have never been to Palestine so I can't tell how well the book captures the exact flavours, but it's pretty much sent me back to Jordan which I visited a couple years ago, so I'm guessing it's probably spot on ! (and my boyfriend who actually has been to Palestine was quite convinced by everything we cooked so far). I love that the book has recipes for all the "classic" stuff like hu I waited quite a bit to buy this book and am now wondering how many amazing meals I could have had if I hadn't. I have never been to Palestine so I can't tell how well the book captures the exact flavours, but it's pretty much sent me back to Jordan which I visited a couple years ago, so I'm guessing it's probably spot on ! (and my boyfriend who actually has been to Palestine was quite convinced by everything we cooked so far). I love that the book has recipes for all the "classic" stuff like hummus and m'tabbal that still manage to feel and taste different from other recipes, while actually being more similar to what I ate in the middle east (I didn't think I'd ever find out how to make such smoooooth hummus). I also love that it has a lot of recipes for vegetables that I'm not super enthusiastic about (turnips and beetroots for instance) that actually make me want to buy them so I can make the recipe again. On a more practical note, I also love that for each recipe they tell you what you can make ahead, what you can freeze, and how you can play around with the recipe. Really helps to plan when you want to go a bit overboard and cook 5 different things and still have dinner on the table on time, or when you want to know you can just chill with your friends because all you have to do is pop something in the oven/get it out of the fridge. Lastly, as a vegetarian who loves the taste of meat, I was super happy that most meat recipes use ground meat, which means I can make them with a substitute instead and get to eat all the great dishes I had in Jordan back when I still ate animals ! So far I've cooked: - Scrambled red shakshuka: it was really good despite me using canned tomatoes, not having coriander seeds on hand and using ground cumin and smoked paprika instead of the recommended spices. It was lovely to have the egg scrambled and mixed in the sauce as it gave the dish a completely different texture from "regular" shakshuka. Also, I enjoyed the fact that the recipe doesn't require adding sugar like some other I've seen in the past (I'm looking at you, Ottolenghi Plenty). - Green shakshuka: we had a big head of white cabbage we needed to use, so put it in instead of the chard, and once more the recipe was quite forgiving. It made a super comforting dish, that was brightened by the dill, the lemon and the yoghurt. - Hummus with aubergines: the smoothest hummus I've ever had outside of Jordan. The texture was so amazing. The flavour was pretty much flawless, so the texture being so awesome makes this my favourite hummus recipe to date. I used canned chickpeas, but still cooked them a few minutes to get them to the required texture, and the hummus part of the recipe took all of 10 minutes (including 5 minutes of just running the food processor). The aubergine topping was so good that everyone asked me to double it next time, please, thank you. - Burnt aubergine with tahini and herbs (m'tabbal): so, I made this for a pic-nic with a friend and my sister threw a fit that I wasn't leaving her more than half the bowl. I made it again right before I left a few days later and it almost didn't make it to the table and earned my a teary "please come back soon". Again, the big difference with other recipes is in the texture of the dish. It takes longer to "mash" the aubergine with your hands to get the strands than to just put everything in a blender, but it makes it oh so satisfying to eat. - Courgettes, garlic and yoghurt (M'tawaneh): I made this as part of a spread and my mom asked me to cook it again so I could show her how, she couldn't believe how little there is to it. It's got 8 ingredients including the salt, it's super straightforward to make, and it has a huge lovely flavour. - Turnip mash with greens, caramelised onions and feta: we got turnips in a veg box and had no idea what to do with it and then I bought this book. It was the first recipe we cooked from Falastin, and turnip was going to be quite a hard sell for us, but we loved it. The mash is fluffy and light, which makes the caramelised onions and feta on top very indulgent, and the greens somehow just blend perfectly with everything. Can't wait to get sent turnips again. - Bulgur, tomato and aubergine pilaf (Shulbato): super straightforward, super satisfying. Ottolenghi Simple has a similar (also delicious) recipe which uses quite a lot of allspice, and this one is a good alternative when cooking for people who dislike allspice. It's also pretty much a pantry recipe provided you've got aubergine and coriander. - Beetroot and feta galette with za'atar and honey: I don't like beetroot, my boyfriend doesn't like beetroot, we got some beetroot in a veg box. Decided to cook this as the authors seemed pretty confident that everyone would love it, and we actually did ! It has quite a few steps so it takes a bit of time, but none are hard, and you can do quite a bit in advance. I would definitely make twice the crust and freeze half of it in the future because it tasted AMAZING and was so flaky and buttery and a bit crunchy all at the same time and this would definitely cut the work in half for this recipe. I was afraid the galette would be too sweet from the beetroot + the caramelised onions + the honey, but it was actually perfectly balanced. I had a bit of fresh goat cheese that I needed to finish so used that instead of the ricotta, used dried rather than fresh oregano and forgot to brush the pie with the egg but it was still delicious. Not sure it feeds 4 people on its own though, it definitely needs something else on the side. - Kofta with tahini, potato and onion: made with Beyond Meat instead of actual meat, and it was 10/10. I was the one preparing it, so I KNEW it wasn't actual meat that was cooking/I was eating, but still would have fooled me if it had been served to me without telling me. This dish is definitely comfort food, rich and heavy and super satisfying and you just want to take a little happy nap afterwards. - Pita bread: I don't have a mixer with a dough hook, so I worked the dough by hand (for about 12 minutes, it's a bit of a workout) until I got the texture right. Also, I cooked them in a cast iron pan since I had a cake in the oven, but they worked out quite well although only about half puffed. They still tasted amazing and were perfect to scoop up the hummus, mtabbal and mtawaneh ! I can imagine that if you put a Vache qui rit in between the two layers (after it puffed) you would get a totally inauthentically wrong but totally delicious kind of cheese naan.. - Spinach pies (fatayer sabanekh): so, so good. No dough hook so work the dough by hand and they turned out fine. - Pistachio harisa: I was a bit scared because I know middle-eastern desserts can be a bit TOO sweet for me, but committed to the recipe almost as written (couldn't help reduce the sugar in the syrup by a 100g) and it was really good. Very different from anything I'd made before, and still quite sweet, but it was also super addictive and the 5 of us finished to whole tray by the next morning.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Reading Fool

    I am a total newbie to Palestinian food and know virtually nothing about the Palestinian culture. This book was a wonderful introduction for me to this beautiful culture. The recipes are well-written and very approachable. I appreciated the authors' comments to introduce each recipe, especially "Playing Around" and "Keeping Notes" notations, which just made the recipe more understandable and appealing. The photography is gorgeous. I have tried two recipes thus far: Eggplant, Chickpea, and Tomato I am a total newbie to Palestinian food and know virtually nothing about the Palestinian culture. This book was a wonderful introduction for me to this beautiful culture. The recipes are well-written and very approachable. I appreciated the authors' comments to introduce each recipe, especially "Playing Around" and "Keeping Notes" notations, which just made the recipe more understandable and appealing. The photography is gorgeous. I have tried two recipes thus far: Eggplant, Chickpea, and Tomato Bake, and Pan-Fried Okra with Tomato, Olives, and Haloumi. Both dishes were amazing and my family loved them. There are many vegetable main dishes in this book, which I think will do well if I add meat (e.g., lamb or beef) to them. This book would make a fantastic gift. I've received a free copy from Ten Speed Press in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    A range of recipes, both traditional and modern, are interspersed with beautiful photographs and small articles on the food culture of Palestine. So while this gorgeous cookbook may be too advanced for beginners, it's still worth perusing for an insight into a cornerstone of Palestinian life. Be aware that most of these recipes involve moderate to extensive prep work (think doing stuff a day ahead in many cases), but are flavorful enough to be worth the time. While not a vegetarian cookbook, veg A range of recipes, both traditional and modern, are interspersed with beautiful photographs and small articles on the food culture of Palestine. So while this gorgeous cookbook may be too advanced for beginners, it's still worth perusing for an insight into a cornerstone of Palestinian life. Be aware that most of these recipes involve moderate to extensive prep work (think doing stuff a day ahead in many cases), but are flavorful enough to be worth the time. While not a vegetarian cookbook, vegetarians and vegans will find many recipes suited to their diet. An effort was made to modify recipes as some Palestinian ingredients are not readily available outside of the Middle East; however, those living in smaller cities and towns may still find a few recipes calling for difficult to find components.

  16. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    This is a lovely cookbook, filled with easy to follow, delicious-sounding recipes, as well as stories of the Palestinian people the recipes came from. There are tips on how to adapt the recipes for personal taste, and substitutions for ingredients that might not be at hand. There are many vegetarian options, and the recipes are a nice mix of traditional and contemporary fare. The gorgeous photography and stories of the different food cultures add so much to the enjoyment of paging through this b This is a lovely cookbook, filled with easy to follow, delicious-sounding recipes, as well as stories of the Palestinian people the recipes came from. There are tips on how to adapt the recipes for personal taste, and substitutions for ingredients that might not be at hand. There are many vegetarian options, and the recipes are a nice mix of traditional and contemporary fare. The gorgeous photography and stories of the different food cultures add so much to the enjoyment of paging through this book! Keep in mind, not all ingredients will be easy to find, and while the recipes are clearly written and easy to follow, they're aren't necessarily easy to make- some require day before prep work, but the results certainly sound amazing. #Falastin #NetGalley

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Gorgeous photos, great recipes (from what I can see so far) and a variety thereof. They're not all simple and some of the things they say are "easily sourced" are ...not. I'm not sure they've gone grocery shopping in middle America ever. I'm already fond of this cuisine, lots of favorites in here but some new twists to try, and enjoyed the prose as well, highlighting characters or ingredients or places or political issues that enhance one's understanding of where this food is coming from. Overall Gorgeous photos, great recipes (from what I can see so far) and a variety thereof. They're not all simple and some of the things they say are "easily sourced" are ...not. I'm not sure they've gone grocery shopping in middle America ever. I'm already fond of this cuisine, lots of favorites in here but some new twists to try, and enjoyed the prose as well, highlighting characters or ingredients or places or political issues that enhance one's understanding of where this food is coming from. Overall a good food book with some travel aspects. Will appeal to people who are already acolytes of Ottolenghi; hopefully broader than that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    (7/1/2020) This was an impulse purchase after listening to Christopher Kimball on Milk Street interview the authors. What caught my attention, and thus my purchase, was the observation that these were recipes that were approachable by anyone, could be easily modified (the quinoa/bulger debate), and didn't require a lot of difficult to find ingredients. 1st impressions - a beautifully written and illustrated cookbook that blends people and food, something I absolutely love. The cookbook is nicely (7/1/2020) This was an impulse purchase after listening to Christopher Kimball on Milk Street interview the authors. What caught my attention, and thus my purchase, was the observation that these were recipes that were approachable by anyone, could be easily modified (the quinoa/bulger debate), and didn't require a lot of difficult to find ingredients. 1st impressions - a beautifully written and illustrated cookbook that blends people and food, something I absolutely love. The cookbook is nicely organized with chapters on breakfast, starters, main dishes (fish, chicken, lamb/beef), breads and desserts. There are photographs for everything - a must for me, I like to see what my dish "should" look like when complete. I have a couple recipes on deck to try. I'll be back with 2nd impressions on the recipes themselves.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I was so excited when I received this cookbook. I love the recipes contained in this gorgeous book. The photos are beautiful and drool-worthy. What's wonderful about this book is the history of the Palestinians and their food. I enjoyed reading a little more about their history, geography, and the people and the dishes they prepare. I would love to eat my way throughout this book. There's so many mouth-watering recipes. I've received a free copy from Ten Speed Press in exchange for a free and un I was so excited when I received this cookbook. I love the recipes contained in this gorgeous book. The photos are beautiful and drool-worthy. What's wonderful about this book is the history of the Palestinians and their food. I enjoyed reading a little more about their history, geography, and the people and the dishes they prepare. I would love to eat my way throughout this book. There's so many mouth-watering recipes. I've received a free copy from Ten Speed Press in exchange for a free and unbiased review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Margery Osborne

    This is a really excellent middle eastern cookbook with *a lot* of recipes I intend to make. Really, its the most exciting middle eastern cookbook I've looked at since Claudia Rodin opened my eyes to this domain of cooking back in the 70s and thats saying a lot with all the cookbooks from this area in recent years. Many of the recipes are 'classics' but have been heightened (along the salt/acid/fat/heat line but with mid-eastern ingredients such as pomegranate molasses and sumac).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Akın Şahin

    I wish ı could show you whats inside the book. Garbage. Lots of photoes and stories thats all. İt has 6-7 kind of recipies with za’atar? Are there no ther spices in the country? There is a section name is sauces.. there are 2 kind of sauce with tahini omg brilliant. Dont buy this book as a chef, buy as fun.

  22. 5 out of 5

    T

    طبيخ ✊🏾 Enjoyed the recipes, but at times, it felt like the social commentary tried too hard to ‘not take sides’ on the occupation. Nonetheless, an easy and fun read, and particularly enjoyed the focus pieces, specifically the one about the ‘lost’ Palestinian watermelon (jadu’l).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aslı S.

    Brilliant!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ganga

    Another beautiful cookbook from the Ottolenghi stable.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    Sadly I didn't have enough time to do justice to this book and plan to check it out again later this year.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Some of the recipes are complex and/or advanced. Great substitution suggestions. The recipes may be more Palestinian-inspired, but they do reflect the flavors of the cuisine, and the resulting dishes are delicious.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Dewey

  28. 4 out of 5

    elixiera

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bronwyn

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