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Fattily Ever After: A Black Fat Girl's Guide to Living Life Unapologetically

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"The truth is, body positivity is for white women. White female bodies being safe is paramount to maintaining white supremacy." – Stephanie Yeboah, 2017 Twenty-nine year-old plus-size blogger Stephanie Yeboah has experienced racism and fat-phobia throughout her life. From being bullied at school to being objectified and humiliated in her dating life, Stephanie's response to "The truth is, body positivity is for white women. White female bodies being safe is paramount to maintaining white supremacy." – Stephanie Yeboah, 2017 Twenty-nine year-old plus-size blogger Stephanie Yeboah has experienced racism and fat-phobia throughout her life. From being bullied at school to being objectified and humiliated in her dating life, Stephanie's response to discrimination has always been to change the narrative around body-image and what we see as beautiful. In her debut book, Fattily Ever After, Stephanie Yeboah speaks openly and courageously about her own experience on navigating life as a black, plus-sized woman – telling it how it really is – and how she has managed to find self-acceptance in a world where judgement and discrimination are rife. Featuring stories of every day misogynoir and being fetishized, to navigating the cesspit of online dating and experiencing loneliness, Stephanie shares her thoughts on the treatment of black women throughout history, the marginalisation of black, plus-sized women in the media (even within the body-positivity movement) whilst drawing on wisdom from other black fat liberation champions along the way. Peppered with insightful tips and honest advice and boldly illustrated throughout, this inspiring and powerful book is essential reading for a generation of black, plus-sized women, helping them to live their life openly, unapologetically and with confidence.


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"The truth is, body positivity is for white women. White female bodies being safe is paramount to maintaining white supremacy." – Stephanie Yeboah, 2017 Twenty-nine year-old plus-size blogger Stephanie Yeboah has experienced racism and fat-phobia throughout her life. From being bullied at school to being objectified and humiliated in her dating life, Stephanie's response to "The truth is, body positivity is for white women. White female bodies being safe is paramount to maintaining white supremacy." – Stephanie Yeboah, 2017 Twenty-nine year-old plus-size blogger Stephanie Yeboah has experienced racism and fat-phobia throughout her life. From being bullied at school to being objectified and humiliated in her dating life, Stephanie's response to discrimination has always been to change the narrative around body-image and what we see as beautiful. In her debut book, Fattily Ever After, Stephanie Yeboah speaks openly and courageously about her own experience on navigating life as a black, plus-sized woman – telling it how it really is – and how she has managed to find self-acceptance in a world where judgement and discrimination are rife. Featuring stories of every day misogynoir and being fetishized, to navigating the cesspit of online dating and experiencing loneliness, Stephanie shares her thoughts on the treatment of black women throughout history, the marginalisation of black, plus-sized women in the media (even within the body-positivity movement) whilst drawing on wisdom from other black fat liberation champions along the way. Peppered with insightful tips and honest advice and boldly illustrated throughout, this inspiring and powerful book is essential reading for a generation of black, plus-sized women, helping them to live their life openly, unapologetically and with confidence.

30 review for Fattily Ever After: A Black Fat Girl's Guide to Living Life Unapologetically

  1. 4 out of 5

    leni terese

    I feel both seen and educated. You did it, Steph. Thank you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    So I took my sweet time reading this book and honestly... I can say it’s one of my favourite things I’ve read this year. It’s beautiful and moving and funny and insightful and I got all up in my feelings as soon as I opened it. Stephanie is so funny and relatable that I just wished I was her friend! She’s amazing and discusses a variety of topics in this book so eloquently. I found myself agreeing with so much of what she was saying, but she also talked about things that I hadn’t thought/heard o So I took my sweet time reading this book and honestly... I can say it’s one of my favourite things I’ve read this year. It’s beautiful and moving and funny and insightful and I got all up in my feelings as soon as I opened it. Stephanie is so funny and relatable that I just wished I was her friend! She’s amazing and discusses a variety of topics in this book so eloquently. I found myself agreeing with so much of what she was saying, but she also talked about things that I hadn’t thought/heard of before. I would wholly recommend this to everybody and anybody because it’s brilliant- I have no criticisms!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    Great read and another excellent addition to the growing body of work on fat acceptance and body liberation! As a white woman, my key takeaways were how sizeism and fat hate affect women of color -- so I would recommend this book to other white women who are looking to continue their education on their privilege and improving their anti-racist outlook. For example: Stephanie shines a light on the real prevalence of eating disorders among women of color. Our poster child for eating disorders is a Great read and another excellent addition to the growing body of work on fat acceptance and body liberation! As a white woman, my key takeaways were how sizeism and fat hate affect women of color -- so I would recommend this book to other white women who are looking to continue their education on their privilege and improving their anti-racist outlook. For example: Stephanie shines a light on the real prevalence of eating disorders among women of color. Our poster child for eating disorders is a thin, frail white girl a la Alice in Wonderland - but the reality is many girls of color struggle with eating disorders too. One of the things Stephanie mentions is how there is unfortunately mental health stigma present in many African American and Afro-Caribbean communities, which may make it difficult for women and girls of color + size to feel like they have a safe space to talk about their issues. This was true for Stephanie, who was raised by Ghanaian parents. In addition to that, of course, is medical establishment bias. Doctors don't even ask young women of color about their eating disorder symptoms, which goes along seamlessly with doctors ignoring the pain and experiences of people in color in general. Due to what I assume is a blind spot of white privilege, I was surprised to learn that black teenagers are 50% more likely than white teenagers to exhibit bulimic behaviors. Chapter 7 has some devastating stories from a variety of women of color, which really I could not do justice by recapping here. Read them for yourself. They are awful. As someone who regularly experience fatphobic bias from American doctors, I believe them all. Unfortunately, white women like myself sometimes have this mythological understanding of WOC being so confident and secure in their bodies. We act like they have it easier because their "culture" accepts them, black men love curves, etc. But this is all myth and it's rooted in racist ideology. Indeed, in another chapter on dating Stephanie talks about how black men in her experience are only interested in fat white women (perhaps because of the social leverage that comes with being with a white person). While she had one partner leave her for another black woman of size, it was because that woman's "curves" were in the right places. She helps explain, through anecdote and a basic intersectional lens, how fat black women are on the bottom of the mainstream social desirability pyramid. That affects their experience in every aspect of life, including work, school, and dating. (As a fat woman myself, I can say I was NOT surprised by the types of comments she got on dating apps. Those were par for the course in my experience too). That is not to say there are no WOC who are genuinely confident in their bodies. In chapter 6, Stephanie interviews Natasha Devon MBE on mental health and weight. Devon shares her experience growing up with 2 tall, fat, black Aunties who "carry themselves like Queens" but later realizes "their attitude must have been the result of a lot of previous struggle for acceptance." My takeaway here was that even when we do see WOC with that "confidence" we must be mindful about where it comes from. We shouldn't exploit black women's pain by celebrating their triumph over marginalization; they're not here for our inspiration. As Stephanie says, "Lifelong battles with multiple sets of beauty standards leave many black womxn with no choice but to engage in disordered eating in an effort to almost... 'correct' our 'fundamentally flawed' bodies." We should be analyzing why the world is so shit to black women and then figuring out how we can change that. We should stop glamorizing the myth of the strong black woman. So overall, I really enjoyed the book and devoured it in just a couple days. That said, I did have 2 criticisms that I would like to mention: 1. Stephanie uses the word "overweight" a few times in the book to describe both herself and others. She does acknowledge the problematic medicalization of the terms obese/obesity, so I'm not sure why "overweight" still gets incorporated into her lexicon. It made me a little uneasy when I first encountered it. I don't think it spoils her overall message and it is used only a few times, but fair warning to anyone else who is triggered by it. 2. Stephanie uses the term "womxn" but never really explains what she means by it. I think - and this is me stretching back to my undergrad days - the spelling choice is meant to be inclusive. I think I've seen "womyn" before too, as a way to disassociate from the idea (linguistic or otherwise) that women are just slightly modified men. I also see folx used in trans and non-binary communities as a way to promote inclusivity of all, well... "folx" on the gender spectrum. I can't say I fully understand what her intention was behind it, so I do wish there had been a short explanation at the beginning. Finally, I would like to add that the book's design is super fun and colorful. All the graphics and illustrations in it give it a special flair. I got a hardcover copy that had one of those built-in bookmarks, which I love. Also, the cover has slightly raised lettering and decals, so you can run your fingers across it. It's just the kind of book that feels good in your hands and a treat for the eyes. I can see a lot of younger women and girls picking it up and feeling drawn in; it's a beautiful thought. :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Safina Hussain

    Stephanie Yeboah is a plus sized, Black influencer you need to follow. Having followed Stephanie's social media for some time, I was already aware of some of the challenges she and other plus sized women face. What I wasn't aware of was how starkly different these experiences were for black women and how they have been excluded from the body positivity movement that was started by black women in the first place! This book spoke to me on another level. As a woman of colour, I relate to black wome Stephanie Yeboah is a plus sized, Black influencer you need to follow. Having followed Stephanie's social media for some time, I was already aware of some of the challenges she and other plus sized women face. What I wasn't aware of was how starkly different these experiences were for black women and how they have been excluded from the body positivity movement that was started by black women in the first place! This book spoke to me on another level. As a woman of colour, I relate to black women more than any others outside my own ethnicity. That being said, this book is a great insight piece regardless of race/gender/size. There are some great tips at the end of most chapters on resources and actions you can take to prevent 'othering'. Couldn't give it that 5th star because there is a bit of unnecessary filler content, however a great read regardless.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linde

    What a read. So so important. During the two weeks that I kept this book on me wherever I went, I already recommended and mentioned it to everyone I met. Having more and more words to express just how deeply rooted fatphobia is, feels liberating. Stephanie Yeboah not only shares her own journey through such vulnerability but also passes the mic onto others. Grateful for such a well rounded and well articulated book. Grateful for this representation and the joy Stephanie has brought me in these p What a read. So so important. During the two weeks that I kept this book on me wherever I went, I already recommended and mentioned it to everyone I met. Having more and more words to express just how deeply rooted fatphobia is, feels liberating. Stephanie Yeboah not only shares her own journey through such vulnerability but also passes the mic onto others. Grateful for such a well rounded and well articulated book. Grateful for this representation and the joy Stephanie has brought me in these past months since I discovered her online presence. A must read for all!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Duncan

    I think this is a good book for if you are new to the discussion around fat acceptance and the body positive community. But for me I felt like I already knew and had been involved with a lot of this so the more factual elements of the book didn’t hit me in any sort of way. I did love hearing stories from the author’s personal life because I follow them on twitter and genuinely enjoy their content!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This was so hard to read. How long do women have to be treated and made to feel like this and in 2020 surely? This made me want to stay in and cry, which I did because I'm sick and so everyone gets to leave me alone. I wonder what it says about this society when many women and girls can relate to almost everything in this book?

  8. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    Review to come. This was fire.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lori Smith

    Powered through this beautiful book in a day (unusual for me!) because it was so inspiring. It’s full of raw emotional personal stories, no-nonsense breakdowns of difficult and complex topics, but also has useful how-to guides and uplifting guidance.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I can’t recommend this book more! Stephanie is such an amazing voice and what she writes is important for all of us to learn and understand.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Madeline Wilson-Ojo

    Imagine growing up in a world that inherently views you as ugly? Or trying to find your place in an industry which consistently rejects you based on the way you look? I mean, whether, you’re black, white, slim, thick, blonde, or brunette, I am sure we’ve all had days when we feel insulted by the mirror. But for some, this is a crippling daily reality – and for Stephanie Yeboah, who is a fat black woman, this reality formed an important part of her life story, so much so, she has written a book a Imagine growing up in a world that inherently views you as ugly? Or trying to find your place in an industry which consistently rejects you based on the way you look? I mean, whether, you’re black, white, slim, thick, blonde, or brunette, I am sure we’ve all had days when we feel insulted by the mirror. But for some, this is a crippling daily reality – and for Stephanie Yeboah, who is a fat black woman, this reality formed an important part of her life story, so much so, she has written a book about it. I cannot remember when or how I came to know Stephanie (not personally, but you know, through the interwebs), but I have followed her journey over the years and watched as she publicly dropped her alias, Nerd About Town in favour of her real name. In that time, she has juggled quite a few roles: YouTuber, blogger, nine-to-fiver, freelance writer, and now author (please, I am not a stalker, I just know these things). In that time, two things she has consistently been passionate about are fashion and fat acceptance. And oh, sis has levelled up! I must admit, I probably could have identified with her a bit more as a fellow fat black woman, who is also Ghanaian British, in the same age group, and from Saaf London. But I initially found myself getting impatient with Stephanie’s constant lamenting over being trolled and feeling undesirable because of her appearance. “She’s making us all look pathetic”, I used to think to myself. That was until the day I read, in a series of tweets, about how a seemingly lovely date turned out to be a nasty “pull a pig” trick of which she was the victim. Men can be cruel at times! Honestly, this unfortunate incident stilled me. I slowed down and tried to understand Stephanie’s predicament a little more. Suddenly, I found myself in admiration of her. She had bravely shared what was a very humiliating occurrence with millions of readers and had in the process started many conversations about the insidious way in which the fat, black woman is viewed and treated; about the pressure men are put under to perform laddish behaviour in front of their peers; about the highs and lows of dating, and so on and so forth. These different discussions that were happening in tandem made me look back at my own life experiences, and admit to myself the discrimination that I had silently accepted and had put down to “a fact of life”. So when Stephanie announced she was writing a book about being a fat black woman in the UK, I was excited. I had read books about navigating life as a woman, and books about life as a black person in the UK, but never about being fat in a world where slimness is celebrated, and certainly never where all three intersect. I knew I needed to read Fattily Ever After. Is it an autobiography, a motivational read for fat black women, or an educational resource for those who live outside of blackness and fatness? I would say it’s a cool mix of all three. Stephanie subtitles it “A Black Fat Girl’s Guide to Living Unapologetically”. She begins by detailing the harrowing experiences of primary and secondary school bullying, trying to reconcile her love for fashion with the contempt she had for her body, the lack of media representation, and the abject sadness she felt, all of which went unnoticed by her family. She then goes on to deconstruct the desexualisation and hypersexualisation of fat, black bodies. I learned why representation matters as I read about Hattie MacDaniel, the first black person to win an Oscar, who was also a fat black woman. I discovered how her role of “Mammy the maid”, which she won the accolade for, sustained the “mammy figure” racial trope you find in many contemporary Hollywood films, and how this has been compounded by black male actors such as Tyler Perry, Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence, who all at some point have donned grotesque fat suits, wigs and makeup to portray and attract more ridicule to fat black women. (Don’t get me wrong, at the time I laughed along with everyone too). In all this, Stephanie argues the need for diverse black storytelling. As Fattily Ever After develops, what becomes clear is the in-depth research that has gone into this body of work. Stephanie thoughtfully shares the history of the body positivity movement, gives an analysis of statistics pertaining to back women and eating disorders, and explains why scientifically, the BMI chart is so flawed. She also generously tells so much more about her personal battle with disordered eating, her struggles with corsets and waist training, and coming to terms with the fact that she didn’t have the “typically African” shape. (You know, the full chest, tiny waist and backside for days!) Having almost reached the end of Fattily Ever After, I must say I have thoroughly enjoyed this book. So far, I connected most with her stories of how her Ghanaian family were ill equipped to handle her fatness with sensitivity. “…This is why you’re gaining weight. Ayeeeeee OBOLOBO!!”, Stephanie recounts some of the ridiculous remarks issued to her by family members. (Obolobo is a Twi word meaning ‘fat’ by the way – and one I have heard more times than I care to count). I have reflected on what living fattily ever after means for me: self-love, and living a happy, full life with all the flab, all the belly fat and all the chub rub! Fattily Ever After is made up of the right balance of anecdotes (you need to read the case of the lopsided bum pads!) and in-depth analysis to keep one’s interest piqued. Not only that, the pages are gracefully littered with colourful, abstract illustrations of fat black women. She has included real life examples of some of her Twitter interactions with trolls and has reinforced her messages with interviews with other fat black women. This is a rich body of work. The text is diverse and layered, and for that, I really appreciate the book. Her tone is at times, humourous, sometimes emotional, and other times, very “adongivafock”. Although Stephanie insists Fattily Ever After is “A Black Fat Girl’s Guide to Living Unapologetically”, she seems to have also written for the non-fat and non-black who wishes to be an ally, and those with fat friends in their circle. Without coddling, her writing points out and corrects some of their harmful albeit well-intended actions and instructs them on how they can better lend their support. I can’t say I agree with all of her suggestions – some are a bit finicky for me. I mean, “it’s always better to say ‘that outfit looks great on you!’ instead of ‘you look great in that’“. Really Stephanie?! However, I do appreciate the education she lends to others and this makes Fattily Ever After a book for all. When it comes to Black British writing, especially where it centres our real-life experiences, I believe we are just scratching the surface. We are at the very beginning of voicing out, and as a book which centres the fat black woman, this makes Fattily Ever After important. The fact is society will be society, and some of us won’t be losing weight any time soon. But that’s not the point, is it? The point is everyone deserves love, respect and dignity regardless of appearance. This is the underlying message I get from Stephanie’s writing. My final thought is that I recommend all women pick up this book, not only as a form as self-love and care but also as an educational resource and an entertaining read.  

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily Anderson

    This book hurt, in a good way. If you are someone that is/has been fat or has suffered from an eating disorder, this book may be very triggering for you. I suffered from anorexia nervosa in high school and then went on to develop a problem with binge eating. All the feels came up for me while reading this book. Reading about the intense bullying Steph faced, definitely strengthened the voice of my inner eating disorder. This book is tough. It takes mindfulness to get through, because it is painf This book hurt, in a good way. If you are someone that is/has been fat or has suffered from an eating disorder, this book may be very triggering for you. I suffered from anorexia nervosa in high school and then went on to develop a problem with binge eating. All the feels came up for me while reading this book. Reading about the intense bullying Steph faced, definitely strengthened the voice of my inner eating disorder. This book is tough. It takes mindfulness to get through, because it is painful. There is also mention of cutting, so if that is something you have struggled with, be warned, this book may be triggering. However, what Steph has done is incredible. This was such an important read for me. Black plus-sized women have been marginalized for too long. They have been disbelieved by health professionals simply for their size, bullied, abused, cast as non-sexual sassy stereotypes, and have been chronically under-represented. Thank you for this Steph. I have so much more to learn, and a long ways to go as an ally. I recommend this book to all. I feel this book will be most beneficial to those that’d be least interested in reading it (cough cough *entitled white men*). However, all people will benefit. Just note, if you are/have been fat or struggle with disordered eating, this book will hurt and should be read mindfully.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kylie Q. Rada

    "As Strings, and others who preach fat liberation point out, the stigma associated with weight isn't about health. Rather, it's a tool for those in power to wield, with the assumption that if utilized properly, their status within our society's hierarchy will remain intact. Therefore, the goal of weight stigma has always been to keep people who live in larger bodies abased, shamed and regretful for what they have allowed. It's to see their identities as 'spoiled', wasted, and only redeemable thr "As Strings, and others who preach fat liberation point out, the stigma associated with weight isn't about health. Rather, it's a tool for those in power to wield, with the assumption that if utilized properly, their status within our society's hierarchy will remain intact. Therefore, the goal of weight stigma has always been to keep people who live in larger bodies abased, shamed and regretful for what they have allowed. It's to see their identities as 'spoiled', wasted, and only redeemable through the attainment of a smaller body." This book is 1) physically beautiful, much like the author herself, 2) an empowering and very personally vulnerable story of Stephanie's struggle with being a fat Black woman in the U.K. during the internet era, and 3) an insightful and powerful exploration of the uniquely marginalized intersection of fatness, Blackness, and non-maleness, and how society fails, and purposefully harms, those at that intersection on a daily basis. Trigger warnings for mental illness, eating disorders, self harm, fatphobia, racism, suicidal ideation, etc. If you can handle it, the education that Stephanie Yeboah provides is absolutely worth the heartbreak of reading about her experiences. And her authorial voice is soooo warm and hilarious. Love her and love this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Icy Sedgwick

    Having followed Stephanie Yeboah first on Twitter and more recently on Instagram for some time, it has long been my suspicion that she's a national treasure. Now having read Fattily Ever After, I am convinced she definitely is! Yeboah is warm, genuine, approachable, and hilarious. She serves up her truly awful experiences at the hands of bullies, racists, and shit men in this book which is a memoir, manifesto, and call-to-arms all at once. She tackles self-love, fatphobia in the medical professi Having followed Stephanie Yeboah first on Twitter and more recently on Instagram for some time, it has long been my suspicion that she's a national treasure. Now having read Fattily Ever After, I am convinced she definitely is! Yeboah is warm, genuine, approachable, and hilarious. She serves up her truly awful experiences at the hands of bullies, racists, and shit men in this book which is a memoir, manifesto, and call-to-arms all at once. She tackles self-love, fatphobia in the medical profession and the hijacking of the body positivity movement, highlighting the problems present in each area for those who fall outside of the unattainable 'beauty' standard. Yeboah's writing style makes it feel like you're sat having a coffee with her, and it really feels like an honour to be invited into her world, if only through the pages of a book. Highly recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Graham

    FATTILY EVER AFTER by Stephanie Yeboah explores the intersectional perspective of Black fat womxnhood. I bought FATTILY EVER AFTER following the author’s podcast appearance on iWeigh by Jameela Jamil. my favorite chapter by far was chapter 8, ‘The Lizzo Effect,’ which is essentially a fabulous think piece on the cultural influence of Lizzo. the memoir was a quick read- tbh the social media-y writing wasn’t my preferred form, but others might appreciate it. Yeboah has contributed significantly to FATTILY EVER AFTER by Stephanie Yeboah explores the intersectional perspective of Black fat womxnhood. I bought FATTILY EVER AFTER following the author’s podcast appearance on iWeigh by Jameela Jamil. my favorite chapter by far was chapter 8, ‘The Lizzo Effect,’ which is essentially a fabulous think piece on the cultural influence of Lizzo. the memoir was a quick read- tbh the social media-y writing wasn’t my preferred form, but others might appreciate it. Yeboah has contributed significantly to antiracism, fat-positive activism, & intersectional feminism.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bridget McIvor

    An absolute must read. Whether you relate to the book or are looking for an entirely new perspective, this book is imperative in our anti-racism and fat acceptance journeys. Probably my favourite book of 2020 and I’ve had a lot of time to read this year. Also give Stephanie (the author) a follow on Instagram, you won’t regret it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brianna

    Everyone should read this book! Her commentary of our fatphobic and racist society is extremely important. An incredible read for those of us in the plus-size community as well as those who wish to be an ally. As a white women in the plus-size community, her description of her experience of being fat and black was super informative and appreciated.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bex

    Stephanie Yeboah is one of my favourite people on the internet, and - if you don't already - I highly recommend you follow her on Instagram. Fattily Ever After is brilliant: it's witty, informative and poignant. I highly recommend this to anyone - wherever you are on your body positivity journey.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sinead

    I really took a lot from this book. Being fat, I never thought about the difference between fat when white or black. I thought the lived experience would be the same. I could relate to much of what was written but other things really opened my eyes to the fusion of fat phobia and racism.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carly Thelander

    After following Stephanie on instagram for a while I knew I had to read her book when it came out and it did not disappoint. She always tells it like it is and does not hold back. I related to many things in the book and it always feels good to know you are not alone.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Robbins

    “All I know is, my black body is a temple - it is beautiful, independent and mine.” This book covers a vast amount in a short page count. It talks about personal experience and societal tropes as well as how to navigate them. I especially loved the “Create Your Dream Fat Protagonist Challenge”.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chiblutis

    A must read! Steph has made an absolute work of art that takes an in-depth look at fat culture {specifically black fat culture} and how those who don't fall into either of those categories can be supportive and positive. This book was a journey that I'm so glad I went on!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chanel Hardy

    I appreciate her sharing her experiences While there was a lot in this book that wasn't new info for me, I found it very informative and relatable. I think thin women & non-black women can learn to be better allies by giving this a read and learning what it's like to be plus size and Black. I appreciate her sharing her experiences While there was a lot in this book that wasn't new info for me, I found it very informative and relatable. I think thin women & non-black women can learn to be better allies by giving this a read and learning what it's like to be plus size and Black.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    I really enjoyed this book, I could relate so much to the plus size part of this book. Such a great read and I'd definitely recommend for other plus size people and plus size allies.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    OH WOW. EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ THIS BOOK. AND I MEAN *EVERYONE.*

  26. 5 out of 5

    Flo H

    Was a really good read! I used my free trial at audible to listen to the book! Millions of other books on there also! Here’s a link to get a free trial to audible! https://amzn.to/34Ess3c Was a really good read! I used my free trial at audible to listen to the book! Millions of other books on there also! Here’s a link to get a free trial to audible! https://amzn.to/34Ess3c

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I've been following Stephanie Yeboah for a few years on IG and was really excited when she announced an entire book of just her content, and it definitely delivered.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I loved reading this

  29. 5 out of 5

    Philippa Wall

    Let this book have all the success and visibility it deserves!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Lynes

    I absolutely love Steph's writing style. The whole book was like a gentle conversation with a friend. She takes you through what made her the woman she is today, her key influences and gives up space to lift up other fat black women, tackling societal perceptions of fat and specifically fat black women along the way.

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