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Complete Collection Of H. P. Lovecraft - 150 eBooks With 100+ Audiobooks

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This ebook contains H. P. Lovecraft's complete collection. This edition has been professionally formatted and contains several tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a This ebook contains H. P. Lovecraft's complete collection. This edition has been professionally formatted and contains several tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work.


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This ebook contains H. P. Lovecraft's complete collection. This edition has been professionally formatted and contains several tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a This ebook contains H. P. Lovecraft's complete collection. This edition has been professionally formatted and contains several tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work.

30 review for Complete Collection Of H. P. Lovecraft - 150 eBooks With 100+ Audiobooks

  1. 5 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    As far as I can tell, this is everything but the letters (there are some essays pulled from a letter or two at the end). That means it includes some drafts with no punctuation and typos. And juvenalia. This is *not* the best-of collection. I have The Annotated Lovecraft and am working through that. Lovecraft is one of those authors that, unless you have a special interest in, you really want a curated selection of rather than the whole fire hose. When looking at his work as a whole, some things p As far as I can tell, this is everything but the letters (there are some essays pulled from a letter or two at the end). That means it includes some drafts with no punctuation and typos. And juvenalia. This is *not* the best-of collection. I have The Annotated Lovecraft and am working through that. Lovecraft is one of those authors that, unless you have a special interest in, you really want a curated selection of rather than the whole fire hose. When looking at his work as a whole, some things popped out at me: --"Once upon a time there was a setting. AIEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!" seems to be the entirety of his plot a great deal of the time. Often it's, "Once upon a time a found a journal that said that once upon a time there was setting, and the author was like, 'AIEEEEEEE!' and I was like that was creepy, but then I realized, 'AIEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!'" --The Old Ones are really big germs. Like, look up images of microorganisms. --Dude hated that which he fears, and dude was afraid of everything. --"It wasn't my fault; it never would have happened if them damn [insert racial/gender/class epithet here] hadn't made me do it." It's not just that he was racist. It's that racism is the plot of his stories. One of his plots was, "BECAUSE SHE HAD ONE DROP OF BLACK BLOOD SHE WAS A MONSTER." Double yay? He was a master of setting. Unfortunately, when you take look at the whole of his work, it becomes clear that setting was about the sum of his genius. Herbert West is about the only memorable character. I didn't see any plot twists that wouldn't have been around in the pulp era (and that he didn't himself use multiple times). He couldn't write dialog to save his life (or rather he might have been able to write dialog--if he chose to do so--and if he had more than "the main character who is relatively sane and stands in for Lovecraft" and "the character who's kind of nuts" and "look, just don't write in accent anymore" as characters. His research is laughable (ah, yes, a story set in Australia, referring to native magic, and not a word of songlines). His style is hypnotizing (I skimmed a lot and often just fell asleep). But oh, that setting. When it works, it works.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Baker St Shelves

    Lovecraft knows how to write a story that chills you and gives excellent atmosphere in most of his works. He could use help in having more memorable characters, but you can't have everything. It's clear how much how he's inspired by Poe and how much of an influence that he has in literature, comics, and games today. This book has the stories in chronological order, so you can see the progression of him as a writer take form. Now let's talk about an uncomfortable subject: Racism in Good Writers. It Lovecraft knows how to write a story that chills you and gives excellent atmosphere in most of his works. He could use help in having more memorable characters, but you can't have everything. It's clear how much how he's inspired by Poe and how much of an influence that he has in literature, comics, and games today. This book has the stories in chronological order, so you can see the progression of him as a writer take form. Now let's talk about an uncomfortable subject: Racism in Good Writers. It's no secret that Lovecraft was a collosal racist, in fact most people were in that time. However, while I'm greatly opposed to those viewpoints, I do acknowledge that he's great at writing fiction. There are many famous people living and dead that had wonderful creative talent that we're entertained by. That's all well and good, but always try to separate the work from the person. I know that's not everyone's opinion, but that's why there are so many kinds of books out there. In the end it all boils down to taste. I only bring this up, because at least two people I know here were bullied because they like Lovecraft. If you don't like something, just be respectful to the other person and move on. But you don't have to take my word for it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Noa

    Amazing art and animations that kept me at the edge of my seat and really engrossed in each story. As an artist myself, I also really appreciated the bonus sketches at the end. So pleased with this purchase.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Snow

    For lovers of words. If you love to love words in all forms, thrn this is the book for you. I enjoyed it profusely.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charn Singh

    In my opinion, while its near impossible to capture the tone and mood of Lovecraft's work in any visual form, without diluting the intensity, the collection here does rather decent job at attempting it. The art work, however, could have been tad more "ominous" and even used a notch or two higher levels of surrealism. Nonetheless fan's of Lovecraft should still be more or less pleased with the end results. Note: the review is for "iClassics (App Book) Edition" (containing Dagon, The Hound, and The In my opinion, while its near impossible to capture the tone and mood of Lovecraft's work in any visual form, without diluting the intensity, the collection here does rather decent job at attempting it. The art work, however, could have been tad more "ominous" and even used a notch or two higher levels of surrealism. Nonetheless fan's of Lovecraft should still be more or less pleased with the end results. Note: the review is for "iClassics (App Book) Edition" (containing Dagon, The Hound, and The Window), but somehow its also showing up for "Complete Collection Of H. P. Lovecraft - 150 eBooks With 100+ Audiobooks"- which I have never read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Earnest Hearl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Horror, is a good way to get your blood pumping .I love the fluidity of his stories. H.P Lovecraft has been one of my favorite groups of stories. H.P may not be living, but his stories live on. At least for me they do. It's like being hypnotized by H.P You can almost hear his voice as you read each story. The creatures he writes about, are fantastic, and so real like.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Indraroop

    I’d strongly recommend “The Best of Lovecraft” over this. Many of the stories haven’t aged well and many are recycled. It’s obvious that the author was paid by the word back in the day: most stories could be edited to half their length. The best of Lovecraft stands the test of time, but the complete Lovecraft does not.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

    Yawn I'm new to Lovecraft and I know a lot of authors were inspired by him, but his stories dragged on way too long. He seems to rely on description to build up a mood, but there wasn't enough action to keep me interested. The exposition for each story went on way longer than necessary before anything significant happened.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    These are old(1920) tales of cosmic horror. Lovecraft is a master at what he does, I am glad I can say I worked my way through this Tome. There is something to be said for Pulp Writers. They did more with less. I only gave this 4 stars because of the racism. It is part of Lovecraft and can't be ignored.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Reichard

    This is a mixed bag. Some of the stories are excellent, some could be with a little editing and some seem unfinished. Some are just bad. I'm determined to finish the prose but I'm not even going to attempt the poetry. Gotta draw the line somewhere.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J. Stone

    HPL is called a master for a reason. He may have been a man of his time (given all the stuff people have uncovered about him) but I can't deny that his stories are richly written and usually unforgettable. Most stuff you read is not picked up again. HPL is one you always go back to.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karis

    It was ok, not what I was expecting.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Conte

    Lovecraft can get in your bones if you're not careful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lida

    Such a good value!!! I only paid $1.99 US for this complete collection.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raz O'Xane

    Kadath was too much for me, I give up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Philip E.

    Some great stories. Lovecraft's style is unique and his imagination vivid. Even though the stories are dated if gives a great insight into what people imagined was possible back then.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roger Tribble

    Terrific read Lovecraft slowly builds both character and dread. Amazing use of words. Unlike anything I have heretofore read. Highly recommended All his writing is recommended

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kenya Starflight

    NOTE: Before I went to review this collection, I was unaware of the controversy surrounding it -- apparently it was compiled by a Lovecraft fan and posted online for free, and someone else is publishing the compilation on Amazon to make money off her hard work. If this is true, then shame on whoever's trying to profit off someone else's work... but not only did I get this collection for free via a free e-book program, but it appears this volume is no longer available to purchase on Amazon, so at NOTE: Before I went to review this collection, I was unaware of the controversy surrounding it -- apparently it was compiled by a Lovecraft fan and posted online for free, and someone else is publishing the compilation on Amazon to make money off her hard work. If this is true, then shame on whoever's trying to profit off someone else's work... but not only did I get this collection for free via a free e-book program, but it appears this volume is no longer available to purchase on Amazon, so at least the thief isn't getting any more money for their theft... I've been curious about the works of Lovecraft for some time -- while not terribly successful during his life, and while his racist views have made him an uncomfortable figure today, his mythos has seen a revival in recent years, with his take on cosmic horror reverberating with many readers and inspiring many other writers and artists from Stephen King to Guillermo del Toro to the webcomic artist Wayward Martian. This collection gave me a chance to become acquainted with his work, and while his writing isn't superb, his imagination is vivid and chilling, and the universe he created is one that won't soon be forgotten. Many of Lovecraft's most famous works are here, as well as some of his more obscure stories. Of these stories, "At the Mountains of Madness" would have to be my favorite, though I also highly recommend "The Color Out of Space," "Shadow Over Innsmouth," "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," "Cool Air," "The Horror of Red Hook," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Music of Erich Zaan," "The Shadow Out of Time," "The Thing on the Doorstep," and the non-horrific and actually rather hilarious satirical "Sweet Ermengarde." In all but that last story, Lovecraft manages to build a real sense of horror and suspense, and while sometimes the climax/twist can seem obvious to the reader, the payoff is still satisfying in most cases. Lovecraft rarely resorted to the creatures of horror that were mainstays back in his day -- vampires, werewolves, zombies, etc. His creatures were bizarre, ones with strangely shaped bodies, eyes and tentacles in odd places, and biology completely unknown to science. He seemed to understand that the most horrifying thing of all is things of the unknown, and tapped into this quite frequently. And notably, many of his stories share a universe, with elements and creatures and events of one often being referenced in another later on. This is a tactic that provided a sense of continuity to his works, though it wasn't necessary to read all of them to understand what was going on... and seems to have inspired the "shared universe" that other authors have indulged in, such as Stephen King. I wasn't as fond of the "Dreamland" stories in this collection as I was of his others -- "The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath," "The Silver Key," "The White Ship," etc. I did enjoy his "Cats of Ulthar," which is set in this universe, but it's the exception. And yes... Lovecraft was infamously racist even for his day, and it leaves its uncomfortable mark on many of these stories. One character owns a cat whose name would be considered a racial slur today, and his disdain for not only people of color but people of different social strata and ethnic backgrounds will make the more politically correct reader squirm and squint. Some people may have trouble overcoming this as they read, which I can fully understand. While a controversial writer, Lovecraft has left his mark on the literary world, and his mythos has become beloved to a new generation of readers. His work is worth a look if you enjoy horror that's far more than the standard "monster hunts a group of teens/young adults" that's pretty much defined modern horror, and if nothing else it's a nice look at the origins of the Cthulhu mythos.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I have played no fewer than five tabletop games with themes based on Lovecraft's work. But in all my years browsing in the Sci Fi section of every book store (approaching forty years now), his books never looked like something I cared to read. Horror didn't really interest me; the paperback covers were strange, and I moved on. But now, having absorbed some of his mythology (although he might reject that term in application to the universe he imagined), and recognizing (as I did not in my younger I have played no fewer than five tabletop games with themes based on Lovecraft's work. But in all my years browsing in the Sci Fi section of every book store (approaching forty years now), his books never looked like something I cared to read. Horror didn't really interest me; the paperback covers were strange, and I moved on. But now, having absorbed some of his mythology (although he might reject that term in application to the universe he imagined), and recognizing (as I did not in my younger days) that he was writing in the twenties rather than the seventies, I find my curiosity heightened. So on a recent trip to the library for my daughter to pursue whichever example of young adult fiction interested her at the moment, I strolled into the "L" aisle of the fiction section to find exactly one Lovecraft entry. This one. First I need to comment on the annotations. I am not one who can ignore the notes if they're present. So they often interrupted the flow of the fiction in a way that didn't enrich the experience, especially as in some cases Joshi's notes defined words of which I already knew the meaning, and in others they drew comparisons to similar passages in other works (usually by Lovecraft) in a manner that I rarely found enlightening. I'm sure my knowledge of Lovecraft is more thoroughly grounded than it would have been if I had just read the stories, but I probably didn't enjoy the reading as much. Was it worth it? Ask me in five or ten years, after I've had time to show off my Lovecraftian expertise in conversation a handful of times. I think I would recommend to subsequent readers to read the 20-page bio and the excerpts from his letters that are also included in the volume, but don't bother with reading the annotations unless you have a specific need for clarification or desire for more information about the annotated passage. As for the stories, they are scary fiction that came after Poe (who influenced Lovecraft) but before scary fiction was its own genre. That fact in itself makes them interesting, and perhaps peculiar. Lovecraft is not bound by the tropes. His works reference each other liberally; his horrors are generally ancient, powerful, extraterrestrial things that arrived on earth well before humans became sentient. While some people in the tales glorify them as deities, they are not gods, and they are utterly indifferent to human intelligence. The setting for these tales is mostly a semi-fictionalized New England that is now a hundred years gone but which was contemporary for Lovecraft. Having spent the bulk of my life in the same region, there's a familiarity that makes it easy for me to picture the landscapes and the people. Having said that, I don't find the characters especially compelling. Still, the alien-ness of Lovecraft's beings is refreshing. The pacing is perhaps typical for the day (which is to say: slow by modern standards). As for the scare factor: writers of the horrible have had a hundred years to build on his work (and that of his contemporaries and predecessors) to create scenes that will shock even the jaded modern reader; by comparison his efforts seem almost quaint and laughable. In any case, reading The Annotated H.P. Lovecraft was instructive. Perhaps the next time a friend convinces me to sit at the table for a session of "Eldritch Horror" the experience will be richer. But I cannot say that I loved the reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    X 937

    Was Lovecraft a racist? By all accounts he was. But are his stories racist? No. He was a focused and deliberate writer and smart enough never to allow those ideas to tarnish his fiction. In fact, you can readily find more racism and anti-semitism in books like Little Women or The Moonstone than you can in a Lovecraft story. The truth is, in order to truly understand art, you have to learn to separate the artist from the art he makes. I've read some of the rhetoric attributed to him and he seemed Was Lovecraft a racist? By all accounts he was. But are his stories racist? No. He was a focused and deliberate writer and smart enough never to allow those ideas to tarnish his fiction. In fact, you can readily find more racism and anti-semitism in books like Little Women or The Moonstone than you can in a Lovecraft story. The truth is, in order to truly understand art, you have to learn to separate the artist from the art he makes. I've read some of the rhetoric attributed to him and he seemed like a real bigoted jerk. But, much like Poe, his work transcends the rank corpus of its author. Lovecraft short-stories are like a coyote call awakening the bloodthirsty wolf within your lapdog; they grab hold of you on a nonverbal level and arouse the irrational fear and atavistic brutalities which lay dormant in us all. It's both horrifying and fascinating — like a corpse by the side of the road you can't stop staring at. If the goal of an artist is to move you then Lovecraft succeeds in ways that few authors ever have or ever will again.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Dyer

    H. P. Lovecraft Complete Collection is a real mixed bag. Stories like The Shadow over Innsmouth, The Dunwich Horror and The Music of Erich Zann are classics that, while a little wordy, still stand up today. However, these great tales are spread thin in the weight 1000 odd page tome that contains a lot of baffling non-stories. If you're a huge Lovecraft fan I'm sure there is real value in this but for those of us with a more of a passing interest I'd recommend you pick your stories individually; s H. P. Lovecraft Complete Collection is a real mixed bag. Stories like The Shadow over Innsmouth, The Dunwich Horror and The Music of Erich Zann are classics that, while a little wordy, still stand up today. However, these great tales are spread thin in the weight 1000 odd page tome that contains a lot of baffling non-stories. If you're a huge Lovecraft fan I'm sure there is real value in this but for those of us with a more of a passing interest I'd recommend you pick your stories individually; start with In the Vault it is the best one in the whole book. H. P. Lovecraft Complete Collection is a lengthy collection of Eldritch, cyclopean horror that contains some fantastic stories, unfortunately the chaff outweighs the wheat by quite a stretch.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Odd Fallweather

    i got this as an app from the playstore for my android phone. I loved this reading experience! I loved the graphics, the animations, the soundtrack, and above all the stories. I was on the edge of my seat the whole time. I will be reading this again. I really hope they do a volume 2. I would love to read shadow over innsmouth and call of cthulhu this way. hint hint nudge nudge. Magnificent experience!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Albertine67

    Not my usual reading but I enjoyed much of it. I prefer the New England stories which explore the essential weirdness at the heart of a seemingly bucolic, neighbourly place with old fashioned values. Though many of the stories are linked, for myself I found it better to read some and then go off to read other, very different stuff and come back - otherwise it began to feel as though they were all much of a muchness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    James

    This includes pretty much every story HPL wrote, including some of his juvenilia. It's a good way of getting his works in a convenient format, but you will get much more out of them if you also get hold of an annotated edition, such as the three-volume Penguin set. HPL was a cleverer writer than a lot of people give him credit for, which such an edition will make clear.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Purser

    This is a great collection of stories by a writer who has inspired the likes of modern day writers like Stephen Kimg. Arthur Machens influence can be seen in a lot of the stories in this collection. HP Lovecraft was a very good writer and this collection shows you a lot of his work. Highly recommended reading.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    "The Beast in the Cave" is a short story by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft. The first draft was written in the Spring of 1904, with the final draft finished in April 1905, when Lovecraft was fourteen. It was first published in the June 1918 issue of the amateur press journal The Vagrant.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel shilling

    Excellent Classic reading. Lovecraft has inspired numerous authors. This book contains the opportunity to read all of his work plus his instruction to future writers. It also has his thoughts on the writers of his time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bea Batres

    HP Lovecraft, I actually had nightmares as I journeyed through the book. I have little experience on terror, but I enjoyed how the author can unravel, twist and surprise. Given this book is the full collection of works, it is quite long, but I definitely would recommend for a fan of the uncanny.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This dude created his own genre. When you read his stuff you will start seeing his influence everywhere. He is great at writing describing things that are beyond human comprehension. It's fun to look at his stories through a Jungian lens.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alethea Hammer

    The title of this volume is misleading. It is NOT 'complete'. It does not contain "Shadow Over Innsmouth". That is my reason for the missing 5th star. Lovecraft is, of course, as great as ever.

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