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What Would Cleopatra Do?: Life Lessons from 50 of History's Most Extraordinary Women

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Irreverent, inspirational, and a visual delight, What Would Cleopatra Do? shares the wisdom and advice passed down from Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines from past eras on how to handle an array of common problems women have encountered throughout history and still face today. What Would Cleopatra Do? tackles issues by reminding us of Irreverent, inspirational, and a visual delight, What Would Cleopatra Do? shares the wisdom and advice passed down from Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines from past eras on how to handle an array of common problems women have encountered throughout history and still face today. What Would Cleopatra Do? tackles issues by reminding us of inspiring feminists from the past, telling their stories with warmth, humor, and verve. From sticking up for yourself, improving body image, deciding whether to have children, finding a mentor, getting dumped, feeling like an imposter, being unattractive, and dealing with gossip, we can learn a lot by reading motivational stories of heroic women who, living in much tougher times through history, took control of their own destinies and made life work for them. Here are Cleopatra’s thoughts on sibling rivalry, Mae West on positive body image, Frida Kahlo on finding your style, Catherine the Great on dealing with gossip, Agatha Christie on getting dumped, Hedy Lamarr on being underestimated—to list only a few—as well as others who address dilemmas including career-planning, female friendship, loneliness, financial management, and political engagement. Featuring whimsical illustrations by L.A.-based artist Bijou Karman, What Would Cleopatra Do? is a distinctive, witty, and gift-worthy tribute to history’s outstanding women.


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Irreverent, inspirational, and a visual delight, What Would Cleopatra Do? shares the wisdom and advice passed down from Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines from past eras on how to handle an array of common problems women have encountered throughout history and still face today. What Would Cleopatra Do? tackles issues by reminding us of Irreverent, inspirational, and a visual delight, What Would Cleopatra Do? shares the wisdom and advice passed down from Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines from past eras on how to handle an array of common problems women have encountered throughout history and still face today. What Would Cleopatra Do? tackles issues by reminding us of inspiring feminists from the past, telling their stories with warmth, humor, and verve. From sticking up for yourself, improving body image, deciding whether to have children, finding a mentor, getting dumped, feeling like an imposter, being unattractive, and dealing with gossip, we can learn a lot by reading motivational stories of heroic women who, living in much tougher times through history, took control of their own destinies and made life work for them. Here are Cleopatra’s thoughts on sibling rivalry, Mae West on positive body image, Frida Kahlo on finding your style, Catherine the Great on dealing with gossip, Agatha Christie on getting dumped, Hedy Lamarr on being underestimated—to list only a few—as well as others who address dilemmas including career-planning, female friendship, loneliness, financial management, and political engagement. Featuring whimsical illustrations by L.A.-based artist Bijou Karman, What Would Cleopatra Do? is a distinctive, witty, and gift-worthy tribute to history’s outstanding women.

30 review for What Would Cleopatra Do?: Life Lessons from 50 of History's Most Extraordinary Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evelina | AvalinahsBooks

    Despite championing the cause of feminism and equality, we often find ourselves hazy on a lot of achievements by women - especially non-contemporary women. Why is that? Perhaps because history is written by the winners, and those who rebel have often been erased. Well, the book What Would Boudicca Do? sets out to right this wrong, and it does it with no lack of zing and style. Starting with the gorgeous cover that you will want to flaunt in public (so call me vain!) and ending with relev Despite championing the cause of feminism and equality, we often find ourselves hazy on a lot of achievements by women - especially non-contemporary women. Why is that? Perhaps because history is written by the winners, and those who rebel have often been erased. Well, the book What Would Boudicca Do? sets out to right this wrong, and it does it with no lack of zing and style. Starting with the gorgeous cover that you will want to flaunt in public (so call me vain!) and ending with relevant stories to bolster your self-confidence in pretty much any situation, What Would Boudicca Do? is a good companion for any contemporary woman's nightstand or bookshelf. Giving Voice to History's Lost Ones So what did I like best about What Would Boudicca Do? Oh, a lot of things - but most of all, the humor, the motivation, and of course, the knowledge. In the afterword, the authors mention that it was incredibly hard to pick and choose who goes in the book and who doesn't - because its only 50 women, and some of the well known ones, such as Marie Curie, Joan of Arc or Mother Theresa were not included. But that doesn't mean their achievements were not important - the aim was to give some stage time to the strong voices of female history who are lesser known. So while the book does include some really big and well known names such as Queen Victoria, Coco Chanel or Cleopatra, it also introduced me to a lot of powerful women I had never heard about before, and I feel that that's incredibly important. Everything Needs Some Humor Though Another thing that I really loved about What Would Boudicca Do? is the humor and the tone. If you're expecting an encyclopedia sort of vibe, you couldn't be more mistaken. The book is full of alliteration, loads of puns and very bitey humor, especially when it comes to discussing men. I would even venture to call it saucy in places! Seems to me that this was the specific intention to color the text, and it's really the only reason I can't recommend it to anyone younger that middle or late teens - basically, high school material. However, precisely because of this kind of language, I think it would be a great hit with older schoolgirls, and a good influence on them too. I have mentioned before that this is one of those books you should have lying around your house, when your younger cousins or teenage nieces come to visit - and that would be for two reasons. One, the book really is motivating, especially for a young soul without a direction. Secondly, it would very probably institute you into the "cool aunt" status. What Inspired Me The Most? If I had to pick the most memorable women from the book? I would have a hard time, because they're all so inspiring. But let me present you with at least short passages about some of the women who really caught my attention. Again, I am not mentioning the obvious choices - I love Rosa Parks, but you all know about her already. Let me introduce the ones you might have never heard about - the list can be found here on my blog post. It should give you a sufficient taste of what the book is like - it’s pretty much more of this, although with more spice and spunk. It's a really great source of inspiration and a killer of self-doubt. And hey, its one hell of a fashion accessory to pull out of your bag! I thank Faber & Faber for giving me a free copy of the book in exchange to my honest opinion. Receiving the book for free does not affect my opinion. Read Post On My Blog | Themed Bookstagram | Quick Update Bookstagram | Bookish Twitter

  2. 4 out of 5

    Niamh

    There's been a trend recently of books that celebrate women of history and write little excerpts about them that reveal their place in history that's more often than not been glossed over. From 'Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls' to '21 Women of British History', the genre is starting to become vastly oversaturated- enough that it's difficult to have any kind of differentiation between these books. This one is different. Rather than just talking about different women, this one gives you reasons There's been a trend recently of books that celebrate women of history and write little excerpts about them that reveal their place in history that's more often than not been glossed over. From 'Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls' to '21 Women of British History', the genre is starting to become vastly oversaturated- enough that it's difficult to have any kind of differentiation between these books. This one is different. Rather than just talking about different women, this one gives you reasons why they're badass, reasons why they stood out amongst others in their fields and during the periods of time they were alive. For example- 'Mae West and body positivity' is one of my personal favourites, purely because I've done a lot of work on females in film and how they work against stereotype. This book will make you feel better about the world. It'll make you look at everyone from Coco Chanel to Frida Kahlo and examine what made those women great and how much they have in common with women of today. I think it's an excellent read for ladies of any age. It'll teach you how to win at life- but generally, just make you feel a little better about the state of the world.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Romie

    when I say I want a queer and intersectional feminist anthology, I'm talking about this one. just so you know (4.25)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I wanted less pop culture reference, more fully researched history. All of the subjects have much more to teach than the meme-heavy pages offered.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christine Spoors

    The title and cover gave me high hopes for this book, but unfortunately I was left disappointed. I did really enjoy reading about women throughout history and meeting some I’d never read about before. Oddly, the authors had such a judgemental tone throughout which was weird and very out of place in a book about remarkable women. They made subtle digs about everything from feminists who use moon cups to social media users to health food trends?? It felt like it was written by women who judge young The title and cover gave me high hopes for this book, but unfortunately I was left disappointed. I did really enjoy reading about women throughout history and meeting some I’d never read about before. Oddly, the authors had such a judgemental tone throughout which was weird and very out of place in a book about remarkable women. They made subtle digs about everything from feminists who use moon cups to social media users to health food trends?? It felt like it was written by women who judge younger feminists and that really added a sour note to the book. Not sure why these odd comments weren’t edited out! Also the use of slang and what I guess was supposed to be text talk? There were so many moments I had no clue what they were trying to say due to what I assume was an attempt to make it an easier read for younger teens?? This happened before in another book about badass women in history... I just don’t see the need!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I read one or two pieces in this book every morning over a few months, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Not only did the words inspire me and set me up nicely for the day, but the cover image of tired (but badass) caffeinated redhead inspired me too! I now have it face-out on my shelf so I can get a little boost every morning.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin Wynn

    Cute book with some interesting information on some cool women from the past I hadn't heard of before, but it's very much the kind of feminism you learn when you're 16 and first deciding to call yourself a feminist (making fun of 'moon cuppy, man hating' feminists, etc). There was also some romanticizing of some very problematic women which they did address in the afterward, stating that they weren't saying the women were perfect, but when it comes to literal white supremacists I think it would Cute book with some interesting information on some cool women from the past I hadn't heard of before, but it's very much the kind of feminism you learn when you're 16 and first deciding to call yourself a feminist (making fun of 'moon cuppy, man hating' feminists, etc). There was also some romanticizing of some very problematic women which they did address in the afterward, stating that they weren't saying the women were perfect, but when it comes to literal white supremacists I think it would have been best to just leave them out.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    Throughout history women have had to struggle under the rules established by men. A struggle that, sadly, still continues on to this day. In this book, we learn about fifty spirited and feisty women that defied the order and structure of their times. Of varying time periods, careers, achievements, ethnocities, places and class, all these women refused to bow down and "color within the lines". As I was browsing for new books (something I do quite often) I came upon this title. Intrigued, I decided Throughout history women have had to struggle under the rules established by men. A struggle that, sadly, still continues on to this day. In this book, we learn about fifty spirited and feisty women that defied the order and structure of their times. Of varying time periods, careers, achievements, ethnocities, places and class, all these women refused to bow down and "color within the lines". As I was browsing for new books (something I do quite often) I came upon this title. Intrigued, I decided to to give it a go. I am so glad I did. With humour, heart and wit, we are introduced to fifty women that stood up to the patriarchy in their own way (though its worth mentioning that a few of these women did had the support of their fathers and husbands). From queens and royalty to inventors, thinkers and poets, all these women stood out. Wether through sheer force, will and/or words, these women followed their own agenda, not the ones others had created for them. What most impacted me was that many of these women were far from being saints, not entirely "nice" in their attitudes and actions and certainly were not faultless. Yet what shines is their determination through their imperfections. I especially appreciated that the authors focused on less well known women. I was familiar with a few of the names but the majority were new to me (and piqued my interest to learn more about them). The candid style of this book made it a fun read but the subject matters certainly taught me a lot. The author found the right balance of wimsy and informative, fun and accessible without taking away the importance of these women's achievements. Its format (short sections on each women) also makes it an easy read. Would recommend this book, for sure. In the final note, the author talks about how hard it was to just choose fifty names and that many were worthy of being mentioned. The style and format of this book, I think, lends itself to do a volume two (at least). I would be happy to read it if it was made.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    I'm really interested in every biography collection about women in History. This one caught my eye some time ago because of its title: it felt like a practical guide for handling life thanks to great women in History. And it's exactly what it is! This book is both empowering and instructive. For each woman, there is a part about her life and a part about what we can learn from her life. It was both fascinating and interesting: we get to see how these women suffered a lot of hardships and succeede I'm really interested in every biography collection about women in History. This one caught my eye some time ago because of its title: it felt like a practical guide for handling life thanks to great women in History. And it's exactly what it is! This book is both empowering and instructive. For each woman, there is a part about her life and a part about what we can learn from her life. It was both fascinating and interesting: we get to see how these women suffered a lot of hardships and succeeded nonetheless! I particularly loved that it was quite diverse and not only centered around Western women. I got everything I wanted from this book: I learnt, got inspired and added lots of new books to my wish-list!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Garrisson_wings

    Barely 3 stars, and only because some of the women included I'd never heard about before, and was very interesting to read about. But otherwise, did not like the execution and style at all - all the pop culture references and abbreviations and 'advice' annoyed me to no end.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Turns out Boudicca "mercilessly burned key settlements [...] slaughtering their citizens" so maybe she isn't the best example, but that's also what makes this book interesting. In the Afterword, the authors say: "None of [these women] was perfect - some of them did terrible as well as wonderful things. They were morally complex people but we're here to celebrate their achievements rather than how 'nice' they were on the way." I love that - how these women are celebrated but not glorified. I lear Turns out Boudicca "mercilessly burned key settlements [...] slaughtering their citizens" so maybe she isn't the best example, but that's also what makes this book interesting. In the Afterword, the authors say: "None of [these women] was perfect - some of them did terrible as well as wonderful things. They were morally complex people but we're here to celebrate their achievements rather than how 'nice' they were on the way." I love that - how these women are celebrated but not glorified. I learned about a lot of amazing women I didn't know yet as well as great new things about women I did know. This book is also wonderfully witty and I like how it connects all of these women's problems to our moderm everyday life struggles. Great read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Celine

    I purchased this book with the intention of acquiring some insights regarding important females in history. Unfortunately, it taught me very little and tried to rely too much on references from the 21st century. I really expected to have obtained a book which would have been a bit more academic and less informal. The idea is great, but it simply wasn’t well executed in my opinion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ✨j e s s | XXII | Night Court🌓

    EVERY👏🏻GIRL👏🏻NEEDS👏🏻TO👏🏻READ👏🏻THIS . This made me understand myself so much better than those crappy talks you get from school telling you to ‘be ladylike’. We need to view these women as a role models in everyday life and this book has me fired up for life!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fieke

    A great and interesting book that is both educational and funny. It is written in a way that is easy to understand and it has great illustrations! I only wish some parts were longer and had deeper explanations.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marta :}

    Absolutely amazing and inspirational. Full review to come.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Passenger

    This was a joy to read! On a mere handful of pages notable women and their personal and/or societal achievements are presented and the reader is informed why their example, life and story is still relevant for us today and what we may draw from it. I was a tad disappointed - though not surprised - not to find one single Germanic warrior, seer or otherwise notable woman (Thusnelda??? Veleda??? etc.) in this book, of whom there so very many. You find, of course, the obvious and already rather known This was a joy to read! On a mere handful of pages notable women and their personal and/or societal achievements are presented and the reader is informed why their example, life and story is still relevant for us today and what we may draw from it. I was a tad disappointed - though not surprised - not to find one single Germanic warrior, seer or otherwise notable woman (Thusnelda??? Veleda??? etc.) in this book, of whom there so very many. You find, of course, the obvious and already rather known examples in history in this read, understandable considering you want to actually sell a book when you set out to write it. This is more of a positive and "fun" read, not an in-depth look at each of these women in the context of the times they lived in; this just on a side note since some readers apparently expected something else.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Orláith

    What Would Boudicca Do? by Elizabeth Foley and Beth Coates should be required reading for every teenage girl (and boy)! Telling the stories of 51 women over 298 pages, it is all at once witty, sad, rousing and educational. It is a celebration of women from all time periods and walks of life, and it teaches, with a healthy dash of humour, all that women are capable of. While I may not have liked every woman featured in the book, I can understand why they were included and each was as enjoyable to r What Would Boudicca Do? by Elizabeth Foley and Beth Coates should be required reading for every teenage girl (and boy)! Telling the stories of 51 women over 298 pages, it is all at once witty, sad, rousing and educational. It is a celebration of women from all time periods and walks of life, and it teaches, with a healthy dash of humour, all that women are capable of. While I may not have liked every woman featured in the book, I can understand why they were included and each was as enjoyable to read about as the next. Thank you so much to Faber Faber for sending me a beautiful free hardback to review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    chantel nouseforaname

    I thought this book was a dope look into some less common names that we're used to hearing when it comes to women's place within history. I really liked the educational/relational slant on each woman and how we could use their contributions to humanity to empower ourselves to push a little harder in our day-to-day lives. I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to others for sure. The way it was written, I think it'd be perfect to share in a highschool history setting! My only qualm is that - I thought this book was a dope look into some less common names that we're used to hearing when it comes to women's place within history. I really liked the educational/relational slant on each woman and how we could use their contributions to humanity to empower ourselves to push a little harder in our day-to-day lives. I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to others for sure. The way it was written, I think it'd be perfect to share in a highschool history setting! My only qualm is that - as usual, I'm always looking for more black women in particular and WWCD gave me a few, but I want moar moar moar! lol. It's a great book tho.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shahrzad

    My full review can be found at: https://citygirlnetwork.com/magazine/... My full review can be found at: https://citygirlnetwork.com/magazine/...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Who are the strong women who have come before us? What lessons do they have to teach us? Let's take a look. This isn't your mother's collection of biographies. I'd be surprised if you could name half of them, even if you are a woman's scholar; the author purposefully omitted many of the usual suspects, and replaced them with some bold and sassy women whose stories have been neglected in the past. Odette Sansom. Empress Dowager Cixi. Phoolan Devi. Wang Zhenyi. Mekatilili wa Menza. Lovely to see som Who are the strong women who have come before us? What lessons do they have to teach us? Let's take a look. This isn't your mother's collection of biographies. I'd be surprised if you could name half of them, even if you are a woman's scholar; the author purposefully omitted many of the usual suspects, and replaced them with some bold and sassy women whose stories have been neglected in the past. Odette Sansom. Empress Dowager Cixi. Phoolan Devi. Wang Zhenyi. Mekatilili wa Menza. Lovely to see some new faces here. And the author takes a bold and sassy approach to these stories, using each life as a lesson for us women of today. Being a geek and proud. Building your personal brand. Bossing it. Fresh. Startling, at times. Inspiring. #2020ReadNonFic

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I love that it's not a traditional history lesson but a life lesson of what we can learn from these women. It's not about them it's about what they did. A lot in a time when they weren't allowed to, which is always a great reminder on how we should not be limiting ourselves. And I loved the way it was written, absolutely straight forward and at times maybe a bit blunt, like I said it is not a traditional history lesson.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I fear the hip language and references used will not let this book age well, but otherwise it was a wonderful read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Literary Soirée

    “What Would Cleopatra Do? Life Lessons from 50 of History's Most Extraordinary Women” by Elizabeth Foley and Beth Coates is a very funny, irreverent, inspirational, and visually delightful guide. This wise handbook shares the wit and sagacity of Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines on how to handle an array of problems common to women throughout history. Here are Cleopatra’s thoughts on sibling rivalry, Mae West on positive body image, Frida Kahlo on finding y “What Would Cleopatra Do? Life Lessons from 50 of History's Most Extraordinary Women” by Elizabeth Foley and Beth Coates is a very funny, irreverent, inspirational, and visually delightful guide. This wise handbook shares the wit and sagacity of Cleopatra, Queen Victoria, Dorothy Parker, and forty-seven other heroines on how to handle an array of problems common to women throughout history. Here are Cleopatra’s thoughts on sibling rivalry, Mae West on positive body image, Frida Kahlo on finding your style, Catherine the Great on dealing with gossip, Agatha Christie on getting dumped, Hedy Lamarr on being underestimated—to list a few—as well as others who address dilemmas including career-planning, female friendship, loneliness, financial management, and political engagement. Wonderfully whimsical illustrations by L.A.-based artist Bijou Karman add charm to this distinctive gift-worthy tribute to history’s outstanding women. 5/5 Pub Date 23 Oct 2018   Thanks to Scribner and NetGalley for the review copy. Opinions are fully mine. #WhatWouldCleopatraDo #NetGalley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Another book where I like the premise but dislike the execution. The book was very pop culture-y rather than historical in nature and I quickly grew tired of the book's "voice" and writing. No woman detailed is given much time and between that and the writing, it comes across as if the author did very little research. I also would have liked had the "lessons" simply come from these women's lives rather than seeming to choose women to match pre-conceived lessons the author already wanted to cover Another book where I like the premise but dislike the execution. The book was very pop culture-y rather than historical in nature and I quickly grew tired of the book's "voice" and writing. No woman detailed is given much time and between that and the writing, it comes across as if the author did very little research. I also would have liked had the "lessons" simply come from these women's lives rather than seeming to choose women to match pre-conceived lessons the author already wanted to cover. I did, however, like many of the women chosen and that some of the women included were not well-known. Disclosure: ARC received from Netgalley & publisher in exchange for an honest review. (They may regret this.) Any and all quotes were taken from an advanced edition subject to change in the final edition.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Innastholiel

    Thank God, it's finally over. Look, I appreciate the thought, but I really did not care for the execution. Every chapter is bubbly and punchy, and it's exhausting. Not to mention that, obviously, you don't get much of an insight into any of these women's lives because each one of them has, on average, three to four pages dedicated to them, and about half of that is made up of a far-fetched introduction and how this woman's life story could benefit your own, which, for the most part, is also a st Thank God, it's finally over. Look, I appreciate the thought, but I really did not care for the execution. Every chapter is bubbly and punchy, and it's exhausting. Not to mention that, obviously, you don't get much of an insight into any of these women's lives because each one of them has, on average, three to four pages dedicated to them, and about half of that is made up of a far-fetched introduction and how this woman's life story could benefit your own, which, for the most part, is also a stretch. I really don't care for this type of non-fiction.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Liva

    What would Boudicca do is a entertaining and inspiring book about fifty of history's most remarkable women and how their achievements are still relevant today. Both the very glamorous and less glamorous parts of their lives make an appearance, hold together by a dose of humour and wonderful illustrations. The collection of these fifty woman was pretty good, talking about some classics like Rosa Parks, Cleopatra and Frida Kahlo but also some lesser known ones like Gráinne Ní Mháille, Sacagawea an What would Boudicca do is a entertaining and inspiring book about fifty of history's most remarkable women and how their achievements are still relevant today. Both the very glamorous and less glamorous parts of their lives make an appearance, hold together by a dose of humour and wonderful illustrations. The collection of these fifty woman was pretty good, talking about some classics like Rosa Parks, Cleopatra and Frida Kahlo but also some lesser known ones like Gráinne Ní Mháille, Sacagawea and Masako Katsura. While they definitely did have a lot of international ladies I would have liked to see more (especially Latin America and Africa was lacking), the book still remains mostly western. While I enjoyed the additions of modern jokes, and I think they have been added in this large dose to keep a younger audience that maybe doesn't read so much entertained, I did think the pop culture references became a bit to much and I would have liked to see some more in depth information. Also in the part about Amelia Earhart they don't discuss the findings of her bones even tho this information came out months before the book was published, I would have liked to have seen this added in her part because the information feels slightly outdated now. Overall an entertaining book filled with inspirational ladies. Definitely fun to read one or two stories every day.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Wondering how to deal with an annoying baby brother? Think What Would Cleopatra Do? 18-year-old Cleopatra married her 12-year-old brother so she could rule Egypt. Once her subjects got used to the idea, she basically erased her brother’s name on all historical and legal documents and took all the power for herself. While that example might be a bit extreme, this book has many good examples to share. Using the real life stories of fifty famous woman to illustrate maxims on how to deal with everyda Wondering how to deal with an annoying baby brother? Think What Would Cleopatra Do? 18-year-old Cleopatra married her 12-year-old brother so she could rule Egypt. Once her subjects got used to the idea, she basically erased her brother’s name on all historical and legal documents and took all the power for herself. While that example might be a bit extreme, this book has many good examples to share. Using the real life stories of fifty famous woman to illustrate maxims on how to deal with everyday issues is an outstanding dea. The issues vary from facing failure to not being hot to learning your worth. What Would Cleopatra Do? is an empowering read for young girls especially pre-teens just beginning their life journey. The lessons taught here—of loving yourself and not letting barriers stop your dreams—are powerful messages. The method of using famous historic women to display these values is smart and entertaining. Most of the stories are short at around five pages. The book is recommended for young girls and others needing a boost in our tumultuous world. 3 stars. Thanks to the publisher, Scribner, and NetGalley for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Bentley

    I am a woman. I am a daughter and a sister but most important to me, I am an aunty. I am determined to a) make my niece love reading as much as I do and b) make sure that she is a strong woman. It is with this in mind that I read as much as I can about the forgotten women of history; the women who made a difference, socially, scientifically, economically or who just made a difference enough to mention. I want to share these tales with my niece, who at the moment wants to be a princess. I want her I am a woman. I am a daughter and a sister but most important to me, I am an aunty. I am determined to a) make my niece love reading as much as I do and b) make sure that she is a strong woman. It is with this in mind that I read as much as I can about the forgotten women of history; the women who made a difference, socially, scientifically, economically or who just made a difference enough to mention. I want to share these tales with my niece, who at the moment wants to be a princess. I want her to want to be fierce. Whether that is as a princess, as a make-up artist, as a surgeon or as a postal service delivery woman. I do not care what she wants to be when she is older as long as she does it knowing that she is a rock star. This is why I read books like What Would Boudicca Do? They give me an insight into women of the past that I have no knowledge of. I have read quite a few of these tropes and I must say that What Would Boudicca Do? is up there with the best of them. What Would Boudicca Do? – Everyday Problems Solved by History’s Most Remarkable Women by Elizabeth Foley and Beth Coates is available now.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emma Gerts

    This was an interesting and enjoyable read. It was lighthearted, silly, and whimsical, but for all that it had a lot of really interesting information about 50 incredible women, some well known, others lost to history. Some of the "life lessons" were a bit of a stretch, but I don't feel like they laboured the point too hard. Each chapter featured a short, chirpy, interesting biography of the woman and ended with a brief paragraph on how modern women can learn from the lessons of the past. I also This was an interesting and enjoyable read. It was lighthearted, silly, and whimsical, but for all that it had a lot of really interesting information about 50 incredible women, some well known, others lost to history. Some of the "life lessons" were a bit of a stretch, but I don't feel like they laboured the point too hard. Each chapter featured a short, chirpy, interesting biography of the woman and ended with a brief paragraph on how modern women can learn from the lessons of the past. I also appreciate that it didn't gloss over some of the nastier parts of the past - many of these women did things that were terrible as well as brilliant, and the chapters acknowledge this, that women could be pioneers but also racist, or homophobic or whatever else in other parts of their lives. Overall this was a fun little book and I got to learn about some interesting and wonderful women throughout history.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    A cute book that would be a nice introduction for someone wanting to learn more about feminism and inspirational women throughout history. There were quite a lot of women I'd never heard of before, so it was really nice to learn about them. I also liked the mix of women throughout history, cultures, backgrounds, and disciplines. However, like other readers, some of the women were problematic. Even though this was addressed in the afterword, I felt like it could have been more explicitly stated i A cute book that would be a nice introduction for someone wanting to learn more about feminism and inspirational women throughout history. There were quite a lot of women I'd never heard of before, so it was really nice to learn about them. I also liked the mix of women throughout history, cultures, backgrounds, and disciplines. However, like other readers, some of the women were problematic. Even though this was addressed in the afterword, I felt like it could have been more explicitly stated in the problematic women's chapters, as not everyone is going to read the caveat sentence in the afterword. I also found the style of writing a bit too informal and chatty. At times, it felt like the authors were trying too hard to be 'hip' and 'down with the kids'. Would recommend, but you're not going to miss out on much if you don't end up reading it.

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