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Men Against the Sea

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Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, Men Against the Sea is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. With Captain Bligh at the helm of a 23-foot open launch, the loyal sailors are alone on uncharted waters, struggling to survive on scant rations and taking pains to avoid war canoes and inhabit Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, Men Against the Sea is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. With Captain Bligh at the helm of a 23-foot open launch, the loyal sailors are alone on uncharted waters, struggling to survive on scant rations and taking pains to avoid war canoes and inhabited islands under cover of night. Their 3,600-mile voyage from the island of Tofoa in the Friendly Archipelago to the Dutch East Indies remains to this day one of the greatest feats of courage and endurance in maritime history. "Splendid...Nordhoff and Hall have done a magnificent job in narrative Captain Bligh's remarkable feat." --Chicago Tribune


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Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, Men Against the Sea is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. With Captain Bligh at the helm of a 23-foot open launch, the loyal sailors are alone on uncharted waters, struggling to survive on scant rations and taking pains to avoid war canoes and inhabit Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, Men Against the Sea is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. With Captain Bligh at the helm of a 23-foot open launch, the loyal sailors are alone on uncharted waters, struggling to survive on scant rations and taking pains to avoid war canoes and inhabited islands under cover of night. Their 3,600-mile voyage from the island of Tofoa in the Friendly Archipelago to the Dutch East Indies remains to this day one of the greatest feats of courage and endurance in maritime history. "Splendid...Nordhoff and Hall have done a magnificent job in narrative Captain Bligh's remarkable feat." --Chicago Tribune

30 review for Men Against the Sea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Norcott-mahany

    Captain Bligh is my hero. I know: you’re likely reading that statement and assuming that I’ve gone off the deep end. Captain Bligh, a hero?! But I’m not alone in saying that. So says Thomas Ledward, Acting Surgeon of HMS Bounty and the other loyal seamen put off the Bounty by the mutineers, when they took control of the ship on 28 April 1789. While the mutineers had enough scruples not to execute Bligh and those who remained loyal to him, the only alternative they had was to set them adrift in t Captain Bligh is my hero. I know: you’re likely reading that statement and assuming that I’ve gone off the deep end. Captain Bligh, a hero?! But I’m not alone in saying that. So says Thomas Ledward, Acting Surgeon of HMS Bounty and the other loyal seamen put off the Bounty by the mutineers, when they took control of the ship on 28 April 1789. While the mutineers had enough scruples not to execute Bligh and those who remained loyal to him, the only alternative they had was to set them adrift in the ship’s launch, designed to hold about a half dozen men for short trips. Cast away in the middle of the sea, Bligh and those who went with him (18 altogether) in the launch, had little in the way of food or equipment. It was quite unlikely any would survive for long. For those of you who have read Charles Nordhoff and James Hall’s Mutiny on the Bounty, you already know that Bligh and company did make it to Timor in the Dutch East Indies. Bligh then made it back to England to be part of the trial of those mutineers (and some who did not mutiny) who remained in Tahiti and were picked up there. What Mutiny does not tell is the pretty amazing story of Bligh’s bringing that launch to a place over 3,000 miles from where he and the loyal crewmen were set adrift. The second novel in Nordhoff and Hall’s Bounty Trilogy, Men Against the Sea, tells that story. With so many factors against him, Bligh shows tremendous seamanship, leadership and sangfroid and gets the launch and its crew to safety. It’s a task judged near impossible, and which earns him the undying respect of his mates on the launch, even those, like the surly carpenter, Purcell, who felt Bligh deserved to lose the Bounty. Purcell is an interesting character – loyal to his captain, he doesn’t like Bligh much, and only begins to respect him after Bligh challenges him to a fight. Dr. Ledward concludes that it was Bligh alone that made the impossible possible. Each of the novels in the Bounty Trilogy is told from a particular viewpoint. Mutiny on the Bounty is told from the perspective of young Roger Byam, a midshipman befriended by Fletcher Christian, the mutinous first mate. Byam is not part of the mutiny, but is assumed to be so, and so is put on trial. Using him as the point of observation, the authors can give us a view of the mutiny from a sympathetic character who did not actually commit treason. The third book, Pitcairn’s Island, tells the story of those mutineers who traveled to the titular island to hide out (successfully) from the English Navy. The story, told years later by the able seaman Alexander Smith, is not a happy tale. Smith is the only surviving mutineer, and the only one who can tell the whole story of how things went terribly wrong on Pitcairn’s Island. The second book, Men Against the Sea – in which William Bligh plays such an heroic part – is told by the acting surgeon of the Bounty, Thomas Ledward. By having Ledward tell the story, we are able to view Bligh in a way that would prove impossible had Bligh been the narrator. Bligh’s log was available to Nordhoff and Hall, who used it in writing the first two novels. But Nordhoff and Hall wisely choose Ledward as the narrator. As the medical officer, he can comment most knowledgably on the physical and mental strains put on the crew. As a sympathetic observer, he can also note Bligh’s calm in the midst of bad weather, and reassuring regularity of habits, as well as notice Bligh’s temper – a characteristic that may have led to the mutiny. Even to the observant doctor, though, Bligh remains somewhat Sphinxlike, a quality fitting in a commander, something that could not be maintained if Bligh were the narrator. From the Wyeth edition of MenIt is the second book that I find the most compelling and interesting. Having read Mutiny (and seen 2 film versions), I was quite prepared to believe Bligh a monstrous martinet who provoked most of his crew to mutiny. Years ago, a friend of mine suggested I read Men Against the Sea, and I found it eye-opening. It managed to take a figure who was hated with some justification in the first book, and whom I was quite willing to believe a monster, and made him quite the heroic figure. In a crisis (and the two months aboard the launch were one crisis after another), Bligh was exactly the kind of commander you wanted – able to remain calm, take decisive action and command respect from friend and foe alike. When they make landfall at Tofoa only a few days after the mutiny, they encounter hostile natives, but manage to escape with only one casualty, Norton, one of the quartermasters. For much of the remaining voyage – about 3,000 mi. in an open boat – they avoid landing, for they cannot count on friendly natives. Using the knowledge he gained as assistant to Captain Cook, and from various charts that he studied while aboard the Bounty, with only a sextant, a magnifying glass and a piece of wood to mark ship speed, Bligh manages to get the remaining men safely to Timor in the Dutch East Indies. The scant food and water supply have to be parceled out carefully, something that requires a man used to making tough decisions. Where he had often seemed rather aloof and abrupt with the men upon the Bounty, he is careful to treat his fellow castaways with more consideration, consulting with them when appropriate before taking actions. And any tough decisions he takes affect him as much as the men. When we think about the fact that Bligh was in his mid-thirties, and that the Bounty was his first command, his achievement is all the more remarkable (and the troubles he had on the Bounty more understandable – check out Caroline Alexander’s The Bounty: the True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty for a more sympathetic treatment of Bligh aboard the Bounty). And so, I raise my cup of grog high to Bligh and say, “O Captain, my captain!”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dipta Akash

    The thing is that its based on a true story! About seven thousand kilometers, in an open boat! Captain Bligh, I wish I could be like you. One thing I saw here again. People tend to break down and show their utmost character during survivals, thus you can know them. Always interesting.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Walter

    In this, the second installment of the Bounty trilogy, the jettisoned crew of Captain Bligh's 23 foot launch travels 3600 miles from the island of Tofoa to the Dutch colony of Timor. This novel is based on a true story of Captain Bligh's miracle, whereby he saved the lives of 18 of the 19 men who were marooned with him on the little launch to fend for themselves in the vastness of the South Pacific. Honestly, I enjoyed the "Mutiny on the Bounty" better, but "Mutiny" had it all - adventure, the in In this, the second installment of the Bounty trilogy, the jettisoned crew of Captain Bligh's 23 foot launch travels 3600 miles from the island of Tofoa to the Dutch colony of Timor. This novel is based on a true story of Captain Bligh's miracle, whereby he saved the lives of 18 of the 19 men who were marooned with him on the little launch to fend for themselves in the vastness of the South Pacific. Honestly, I enjoyed the "Mutiny on the Bounty" better, but "Mutiny" had it all - adventure, the interaction of cultures, and the legal drama of the mutiny trial. In contrast, "Men against the Sea" is a grinding tale of hardship. The men on this little launch suffered through days of privations, barely enough food to survive, storms, cold, heat, murderous natives and their own arguements and struggles. The Captain Bligh character did a 180 degree turn in this novel. No longer the petty, tyrannical and thieving officer that he was in "Mutiny", in "Men" he is a selfless, courageous and inspirational leader. There were just enough references in "Men" to the mutiny to remind the reader of Bligh's shortcoming, but other than that, you would not know that this is the same man. It is quite interesting. Although "Men against the Sea" is not as good as "Mutiny on the Bounty", it is a riveting story of survival at sea. I would recommend it to anyone, particularly to anyone who loves a good sea story, and anyone who enjoyed the "Mutiny on the Bounty".

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kashfia Nehrin

    though took a little time to finish it but it's fact that captain Bligh is one of the greatest inspirational characters I have ever met while reading books. Awesome classic and yes indeed this is Mr. Captain Bligh has got an awesome personality. The days in sea is the perfect reminder for all , the perfect adventure and struggle.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eric Olsen

    The story of Captain Bligh saving the lives of his menand leading them through a horrific experience. As bad as Captain Bligh came off in the Mutiny on the Bounty, he exceeds with his inexhaustible determination and unfaltering leadership to survive the South Pacific in this almost surreal teale of survival.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marty Reeder

    The second book in the Mutiny on the Bounty trilogy continues the tradition of “books with the kind of content in it that Marty would prefer without even having read it to a dozen of the latest prize-winning modern novels artistically re-treading WWII ‘based on true stories’ with anachronistic themes.” (Sorry, too specific? I just feel as if that is every trendy book club, prize winning novel choice nowadays. And it just makes me tired thinking of reading and feeling as if I am being forced by e The second book in the Mutiny on the Bounty trilogy continues the tradition of “books with the kind of content in it that Marty would prefer without even having read it to a dozen of the latest prize-winning modern novels artistically re-treading WWII ‘based on true stories’ with anachronistic themes.” (Sorry, too specific? I just feel as if that is every trendy book club, prize winning novel choice nowadays. And it just makes me tired thinking of reading and feeling as if I am being forced by everyone to admit how amazing it is. Whereas survival on the open sea in a small boat after a mutiny? You had me at survival and sealed the deal with mutiny.) Where the Mutiny on the Bounty details the build up to the mutiny, the mutiny, and the first adventures of the mutineers until some of them are taken back to England, Men Against the Sea is the much more simple tale of how Lieutenant Bligh miraculously took 18 crew members in an overcrowded, open boat, four thousand miles to safety with very limited food supplies and no firearms. Mutiny definitely is the more fleshed out novel boasting romance, conflict, legal drama, exotic settings, and grave injustice to be addressed, yet it also has the advantage of providing the same sort of survivor element found in Men Against the Sea. That does not diminish the incredible events only marginally fictionalized in this true story telling of an adventure matched--perhaps--only by Shackleton and the survivors of The Essex. Once again, the authors choose a narrator with excellent perspective on the adventure, although this time the narrator is far less involved or developed as in The Mutiny--merely a purpose to an end of telling the story. Which story is told without a whole lot of elaboration or frills. For me, that is more than enough. The real life events, coupled with some insightful moments of description and emotions during various stages of the adversity in the journey provide all that I needed from this “spin-off” of the original tale. While I don’t quite have the same admiration for the leadership qualities of Bligh as I do for Shackleton nor the sense of pity for what he suffered that I hold for Pollard of the Essex, I can say that his determination and laser-focus on his duty undoubtedly rescued the crew where few others could have. I imagine the third book will do more of the same as the second. Neither will be able to top the first with its complete story, but if it does what Men Against the Sea does, that is--as I’ve said--more than enough for me!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2927397.html I read Men Against the Sea during a particularly insomniac night; it's the shortest of the three books, told in the voice of the (historical) surgeon's mate of the Bounty, Thomas Ledward, explaining the epic 41-day, 6,500 km journey taken by Bligh and 18 others in an 7-metre long open boat from the site of the mutiny (near Tofua, one of the Tonga islands) to Kupang at the western end of Timor, avoiding the potentially hostile shores of Australia and oth https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2927397.html I read Men Against the Sea during a particularly insomniac night; it's the shortest of the three books, told in the voice of the (historical) surgeon's mate of the Bounty, Thomas Ledward, explaining the epic 41-day, 6,500 km journey taken by Bligh and 18 others in an 7-metre long open boat from the site of the mutiny (near Tofua, one of the Tonga islands) to Kupang at the western end of Timor, avoiding the potentially hostile shores of Australia and other islands - one man was killed at the very beginning, on Tofua. It is an extraordinary feat of navigation, and Nordhoff and Hall succeed in spinning it out; the internal tensions among the 18 survivors are easy to imagine and well portrayed. The impact of their ordeal on the men's digestive systems also is a disturbing but reasonable detail. Interestingly, Samuel is portrayed here as just another crew member; the previous book's anti-Semitism has disappeared. The book ends with Ledward taking his leave of Bligh, who is on his way back to London. In real life, Ledward was one of the five crewmen who died very soon after they reached Batavia (where they all went shortly after arriving in Timor).

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    Well, what a masterful tale is this historical novel! "Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, "Men Against the Sea" is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. They were abandoned in a "launch" which is an open boat with the forward part covered. Prior to the era of engines on small craft, a launch was the largest boat carried on a vessel powered by sail I am impressed how the two authors wrote this story so plausibly Well, what a masterful tale is this historical novel! "Unsurpassed as a gripping tale of historical adventure, "Men Against the Sea" is the epic account of the eighteen loyal men set adrift on the high seas after the mutiny on the Bounty. They were abandoned in a "launch" which is an open boat with the forward part covered. Prior to the era of engines on small craft, a launch was the largest boat carried on a vessel powered by sail I am impressed how the two authors wrote this story so plausibly, keeping the pace taut, Captain Bligh showing his worst and definitely his best qualities of leadership and strength. In a 23-foot open launch, the sailors were alone on uncharted waters, struggling to survive on scant rations and taking pains to avoid war canoes and inhabited islands under cover of night. Their truly remarkable 3,600-mile voyage from the island of Tofoa in the Friendly Archipelago to the Dutch East Indies must surely be "one of the greatest feats of courage and endurance in maritime history." It is a skilled author who can follow eighteen men in an open launch crossing the Pacific and each day find events that capture the reader's focus. Should not an open boat day after day after day form a boring tedious drab tale which loses the reader? How do Nordhoff and James Norman Hall infuse each day with a new event, a new insight, a new relation and physical condition of the men - each day seeming new and holding a grip on the reader?? Yet they do. Here is a new sample on page 205, just beyond the outermost reefs of New Holland (Australia), and only 50 pages from the end, it written:- "What's that? Directly in our wake and not more than a quarter of a mile away, a black loud hung low over the sea, with a sagging point that approached the water in a curious, jerking fashion. And just beneath, he surface of the sea was agitated as if by a small maelstrom. Little by little, the sea rose in a conical point, making a rushing, roaring noise that was now plainly audible; little by little, the cloud sagged down to meet it. Than suddenly the sea and cloud met in a whirling column which lengthened as the cloud above seemed to rise rapidly. 'Only a waterspout,' said Bligh.... The column of water, many hundreds of feet high and thicker than the greatest oak in England, had a clear, glassy look and seemed to revolve with incredible rapidity. At its base, the sea churned and roared with sound that would have made loud sound inaudible." Bligh completes this launch through the Pacific of 3,618 miles in an open launch, in 1789, only one man failing to survive a week or so after reaching the Dutch station on Timor. "Men Against the Sea" is the second installment in the trilogy by Americans who joined in writing a handful of popular stories. Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall about the mutiny aboard HMS Bounty. It is preceded by Mutiny on the "Bounty" and followed by Pitcairn's Island. The novel first appeared in serial form in The Saturday Evening Post (November 18, 1933 through December 9, 1933) hence the copyright date of 1933, and it was first printed in hardcover in January 1934 by Little, Brown and Company.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Plabon Kumar Saha

    After the first book where William Bligh, former captain of the royal ship bounty was forced to relinquish his posted and leave in a rather small vessel with eighteen men. Men Against the Sea follows the journey of Lieutenant William Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers of the Bounty. The story is told from the perspective of Thomas Ledward, the Bounty's acting surgeon, who went into the ship's launch with Bligh. It begins after the main events described in the After the first book where William Bligh, former captain of the royal ship bounty was forced to relinquish his posted and leave in a rather small vessel with eighteen men. Men Against the Sea follows the journey of Lieutenant William Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers of the Bounty. The story is told from the perspective of Thomas Ledward, the Bounty's acting surgeon, who went into the ship's launch with Bligh. It begins after the main events described in the novel and then moves into a flashback, finishing at the starting point.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    Men Against the Sea is a heroic tale of 19 men as they attempt to get back home. The adventure is firmly ground in reality, but that makes it only more adventurous and enjoyable. The characters, especially that of Captain Bligh, and enjoyable and memorable; and if you enjoy the sea, or sailing, or true survival stories I would recommend this book as well as the Mutiny on the Bounty.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zarifa Nabila

    If you have Captain Bligh with you in the endless sea there's nothing to worry about. Just enjoy the journey and learn so many things from every situation. I loved the 1st book of Bounty Trilogy. This one is a worthy sequel of that. Who would ever know that the hated person of the 1st book will become the hero :D

  12. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    I saw him then as he deserved to be seen, in a light that transfigured him. Enough. The deepest emotions of the heart are not lightly to be spoken of, and no words of mine could add to the stature of the captain of the Bounty’s launch.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Partha Goswami

    It is good but not that good like the first one in the series. Many parts seemed repetitive of the first part. Anyway story was good, but could be summarized a bit. It can have a three and half star.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rolf

    A classic tale. I read it when I was in high school and enjoyed it again while we were in the South Pacific recently.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kevin J

    Mutiny on the Bounty is one of my favorite novels. This is a worthy sequel.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Walls

    Easy, engaging, etc.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Balkany

    Never having read the Bounty trilogy, I found this an interesting account based on fact..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Athena

    Perfect for an armchair sailor like me. I’m looking forward to finishing this series of novels and then reading some nonfiction about Bligh and Christian.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul Cornelius

    This book continues the story of mutiny aboard the British armed vessel, the Bounty. It picks up the story of its captain, William Bligh, following the mutiny and details the 3600 mile voyage across open seas he took with 17 other members of the crew. Nordhoff and Hall turned this adventure story into something more than mere action; it provided an alternative psychological insight into Bligh from the one detailed in the first book of the trilogy. It is extraordinary how Bligh transforms from a p This book continues the story of mutiny aboard the British armed vessel, the Bounty. It picks up the story of its captain, William Bligh, following the mutiny and details the 3600 mile voyage across open seas he took with 17 other members of the crew. Nordhoff and Hall turned this adventure story into something more than mere action; it provided an alternative psychological insight into Bligh from the one detailed in the first book of the trilogy. It is extraordinary how Bligh transforms from a psychotic martinet into a bonafide hero in Men Against the Sea. From being a character of disgust, Bligh becomes a man uniquely suited to the task he faces of saving himself and his 17 member loyal crew. Another turn in this volume from the first book Mutiny on the Bounty, is the change in narrator. Mutiny has as its narrator the young midshipman, Roger Byam. In Men Against the Sea, the narrator is the older, wiser, and more knowledgeable ship's surgeon, Thomas Ledward. Accordingly, the narration shifts from the perspective a young man eager for action and adventure--while being more than a bit naive--to an older man more nuanced with life and its disappointments and harsh demands. Ledward's narration and dialogue, therefore, is a bit more complex and expert than Byam's. This is a subtle shift that Nordhoff and Hall managed to pull off in a manner so to shift the reader's entire point of view from that of the first book. Finally, there is the description of the sea. Men Against the Sea yields an image of the ocean that is constantly changing. From storms and purple clouds to sunlit days of blinding clarity, the passage of the men through the waters is as varied as any trek along the land. Blue waters, clear waters, foul waters, all turned glassy calm or foamy and violent, the sea is ever changing. By novel's end, the reader is just as eager to follow the fate of the Bounty's loyal seamen as he or she was to see out the eventual fate of the mutineers in the first volume.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Men Against the Sea is a nice piece of historical fiction, set in 1789, based on the nautical log and personal writings of Captain Bligh chronicling the 3,652 mile voyage 19 men jammed into a 23 foot row-boat. These guys were on the losing side of the whole mutiny on the Bounty thing. I liked Nordhoff and Hall's exhaustive research which produced a book that was both entertaining to read and as factual as possible. After weeks of eating nothing but bread and water these guy's hit the Great Barri Men Against the Sea is a nice piece of historical fiction, set in 1789, based on the nautical log and personal writings of Captain Bligh chronicling the 3,652 mile voyage 19 men jammed into a 23 foot row-boat. These guys were on the losing side of the whole mutiny on the Bounty thing. I liked Nordhoff and Hall's exhaustive research which produced a book that was both entertaining to read and as factual as possible. After weeks of eating nothing but bread and water these guy's hit the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of New Holland (Australia) and go crazy eating clam stew and oysters on the half shell. After reading all of the sufferings of exposure, hunger, having to continuously bail water from the row-boat, and getting chased by hostile South Sea islanders, I was glad that these guys finally got to rest on a beautiful beach and eat some delicious food.

  21. 5 out of 5

    M. Patrick

    It took me a while longer to read because I couldn't get into it as much as I did the first. Also, the first book gave me such a negative view of Bligh that I found it hard to read this point of view which praised Bligh's leadership skills frequently. However, it was excellently written, short, and despite the fact that they are simply floating at sea for 3/4 of the book, it was never dull (unlike Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea). By the end, as much as I hate to admit it, I found that I now hav It took me a while longer to read because I couldn't get into it as much as I did the first. Also, the first book gave me such a negative view of Bligh that I found it hard to read this point of view which praised Bligh's leadership skills frequently. However, it was excellently written, short, and despite the fact that they are simply floating at sea for 3/4 of the book, it was never dull (unlike Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea). By the end, as much as I hate to admit it, I found that I now have a huge respect and amazement for the determined and impossibly strong Captain Bligh. I very much look forward to reading the final story of what happened on Pitcairn's Island.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Fascinating account of an open water journey across the south Pacific. Bligh's crew mutiny and send him off the ship with a small crew of faithfuls. An expert seaman, he demonstrates incredible leadership when he pilots this small rowboat and a handful of men across hundreds of miles of open ocean. Their bravery and resourcefulness are surpassed, in my opinion, only by Earnest Shackelton who made a similar trek under conditions even more trying.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Men Against the Sea is not as good as Mutiny on the Bounty, but how much purchase can you get with 19 men on a 23 foot launch with only 8 inches of freeboard amidships? I seem to be going through a 12 year old boy phase. At any rate, this is a truly amazing and horrifying account of Captain Bligh's heroic sail to safety over 3600 miles of the Pacific Ocean in an open boat. Fascinating, unimaginable, and a true story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    You couldn't ask for anymore out of this story. You know exactly what you're going to get, but it delivers. The narration is straightforward and likable, and the perspective seems appropriately representative of the times. I empathized with and admired the men's feelings for the sturdy launch that ferried them along their impossible journey, and felt a sadness once it had to go. I only wish I knew more/could remember some of the many boat and sailing terminology used.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Amazing story (based on historical records) of Captain Bligh's voyage of over 3600 miles with 19 men in a small boat over open sea to reach land after being ousted from the HMS Bounty. Bligh comes across a bit too nice in the book, although he certainly deserves kudos for getting all but one man (who was killed by unfriendly natives on an island on the way) back to safety.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    It is nice to be able to follow the mutiny from all the different points of view and also to see what happened to the three different groups involved in this mutiny. This was the second part of the story and I have just finished the third, can't wait to see what happens. This is also a very compelling read due to the hardships the crew has to endure.

  27. 5 out of 5

    George Heidemark

    This is volume 2 in the Mutiny on the Bounty trilogy. The first book is the best known of the series but this book is a ripping yarn. It tells the tale of the loyal crew members of Captain Bligh who were set adrift by mutineers. They crossed the Pacific in an open boat crossing 3,600 miles of sea. They faced storms, Natives and starvation. A good old fashioned read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Exciting true-life tale of what happened to Captain Bligh after the mutiny on the Bounty. Cast adrift with 17 loyal crew members in an open lifeboat, he navigated them across 3,600 miles of open sea to the Dutch East Indies. This novel is very short and doesn't have the twists, turns, and emotional details of Mutiny on the Bounty, but it's a very enthralling sea adventure.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Muriel Schwenck

    I read the Bounty Trilogy over and over when I was a kid. Several times, I read the trilogy over weekends, disregarding my homework of course. Yes, I was a fast ad voracious reader. Men Against the Sea was always my favorite. Nordhoff and Hall are good reads for any age. I still enjoy and re-read their novels over many decades.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bill Westenberg

    Second book in the Bounty trilogy, this book takes you on the stunning voyage of Bligh and the other members of the Bounty who were mutinied against. Another wonderful look in to human nature. One leaves the book with very conflicted feelings towards Bligh.

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