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Children of the Fleet

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From Orson Scott Card, award-winning and bestselling author of Ender's Game, his first solo Enderverse novel in years. Children of the Fleet is a new angle on Card's bestselling series, telling the story of the Fleet in space, parallel to the story on Earth told in the Ender's Shadow series. Ender Wiggin won the Third Formic war, ending the alien threat to Earth. Afterward From Orson Scott Card, award-winning and bestselling author of Ender's Game, his first solo Enderverse novel in years. Children of the Fleet is a new angle on Card's bestselling series, telling the story of the Fleet in space, parallel to the story on Earth told in the Ender's Shadow series. Ender Wiggin won the Third Formic war, ending the alien threat to Earth. Afterwards, all the terraformed Formic worlds were open to settlement by humans, and the International Fleet became the arm of the Ministry of Colonization, run by Hirum Graff. MinCol now runs Fleet School on the old Battle School station, and still recruits very smart kids to train as leaders of colony ships, and colonies. Dabeet Ochoa is a very smart kid. Top of his class in every school. But he doesn't think he has a chance at Fleet School, because he has no connections to the Fleet. That he knows of. At least until the day that Colonel Graff arrives at his school for an interview.


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From Orson Scott Card, award-winning and bestselling author of Ender's Game, his first solo Enderverse novel in years. Children of the Fleet is a new angle on Card's bestselling series, telling the story of the Fleet in space, parallel to the story on Earth told in the Ender's Shadow series. Ender Wiggin won the Third Formic war, ending the alien threat to Earth. Afterward From Orson Scott Card, award-winning and bestselling author of Ender's Game, his first solo Enderverse novel in years. Children of the Fleet is a new angle on Card's bestselling series, telling the story of the Fleet in space, parallel to the story on Earth told in the Ender's Shadow series. Ender Wiggin won the Third Formic war, ending the alien threat to Earth. Afterwards, all the terraformed Formic worlds were open to settlement by humans, and the International Fleet became the arm of the Ministry of Colonization, run by Hirum Graff. MinCol now runs Fleet School on the old Battle School station, and still recruits very smart kids to train as leaders of colony ships, and colonies. Dabeet Ochoa is a very smart kid. Top of his class in every school. But he doesn't think he has a chance at Fleet School, because he has no connections to the Fleet. That he knows of. At least until the day that Colonel Graff arrives at his school for an interview.

30 review for Children of the Fleet

  1. 4 out of 5

    J. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    I'll read it, BUT Why was this more important than Shadows Alive? Come on, man, two series, 14 books.... let's crank out that tie-together finale novel already.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. With Children of the Fleet, Orson Scott Card delivers the fast-paced, exciting space adventure he has long been synonymous with. This tale of teen genius Dabeet Ochoa riveting both in its re-purposing of battle school as well as its focus on the trial and tribulations of its new protagonist, as he encounters manipulation and mysteries along his way toward fulfilling his dreams. After Ender Wiggin ended the Third Formic war, the focus of the International Fleet c Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. With Children of the Fleet, Orson Scott Card delivers the fast-paced, exciting space adventure he has long been synonymous with. This tale of teen genius Dabeet Ochoa riveting both in its re-purposing of battle school as well as its focus on the trial and tribulations of its new protagonist, as he encounters manipulation and mysteries along his way toward fulfilling his dreams. After Ender Wiggin ended the Third Formic war, the focus of the International Fleet changed. Now, the old Battle School has been re-purposed as a Fleet School, tasked with producing a new generation of leaders, who will lead the Ministry of Colonizations’ expeditions to settle humans across the habitable worlds of the Formic Empire. The only thing which hasn’t changed is Hirum Graff is still involved, and child geniuses are still the preferred students for the new Fleet School. Enter Dabeet Ochoa. This teenager is an immigrant to the United States and also a genius by any standard. He is driven, arrogant, yet cunning enough to cover-up his inner feelings of superiority with a veneer of politeness and harmlessness. Naturally, Dabeet aspires to attend Fleet School, though he doubts he will ever be accepted since he has no ties to the Fleet, but his motivations to do so are less grand or altruistic than others. All Dabeet really desires is to get away from his over-protective and smothering mother, who never tires of telling everyone elaborate lies (At least, Dabeet believes them to be untrue.) of a Fleet officer who impregnated her then abandoned her and Dabeet. The constant annoyance of his mother the driving force behind Dabeet’s success. For all his plans and triumphs however, Dabeet never dreams of actually being accepted into Fleet School. At least, he doesn’t until one day he has a rather notorious visitor: Colonel Graff. The old teacher of Ender Wiggins having taken a personal interest in this gifted youth. As many of you will have no doubt guessed, Children of the Fleet is a coming-of-age tale about Dabeet Ochoa, involves military-like training, and it definitely has some similarities to Ender’s Game in its general execution. But make no mistake, this is a completely different beast with new characters, different themes, and a more detailed build. The main focus of the narrative and its greatest success is the character of Dabeet Ochoa. Orson Scott Card crafting a complex youth who has exceptional abilities yet severe weakness, specifically his difficulty making friends, judging people, and not allowing his arrogance and disdain for others to get in the way of being able to work with them. His flaws major hurdles to overcome if he ever wishes to become an expedition leader, who must lead large groups of people into space. This story a tale about Dabeet attempting to mend his ways, mold himself into the new sort of hero which the world now needs. Complimenting this character study is a very intriguing undertone of political lies and intrigue. Something is going on in the Ministry of Colonization; their motives not as altruistic as one would expect from this organization. But what the Ministry is hiding and what their true motives are is never revealed, merely teased, and promise an unwelcomed surprises as the series progresses. The only criticism I can level at the book is the fairly numerous explanatory sections of the narrative, which were lengthy at times. Certainly, new visitors to the Enderverse need to be brought up to date on everything which occurred with Ender Wiggins, but these interludes of tell-not-show were used a bit too much for my personal tastes, though others might not necessarily agree. Overall, Children of the Fleet did a great job introducing a far different kind of character in Dabeet Ochoa, placing him on the pathway to exciting adventures and real character growth, and teasing readers with suggestions of far more dangerous and ominous intrigue taking place just outside their perceptions. Plus, it did something even more noteworthy to Enderverse fans: it returned Orson Scott Card to this beloved setting and promises even grander stories to come. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank them for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/11/03/... I confess, I’m not too well-versed in the Enderverse, with Ender’s Game being the extent of my experience with the series. Still, I was drawn to the Children of the Fleet because it was pitched to me as the beginning of a new story arc which runs parallel to the events on Earth as told in the Ender’s Shadow sequence, so I decided to give it a try in the hopes that I won’t get too lost. In this novel, we are given the firs 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/11/03/... I confess, I’m not too well-versed in the Enderverse, with Ender’s Game being the extent of my experience with the series. Still, I was drawn to the Children of the Fleet because it was pitched to me as the beginning of a new story arc which runs parallel to the events on Earth as told in the Ender’s Shadow sequence, so I decided to give it a try in the hopes that I won’t get too lost. In this novel, we are given the first look into Battle School, now re-purposed and renamed to Fleet School ever since Ender Wiggin brought an the end of the Formic Wars. Our protagonist is an 11-year-old named Dabeet Ochoa, a highly intelligent but also extremely arrogant little boy. Raised by his overbearing mother, he desperately wants to escape his life surrounded by mediocrity. His dream is to attend Fleet School which he believes is his prerogative, since—according to his mother—Dabeet’s father is an officer in the International Fleet who got her pregnant and then abandoned them both. In truth though, Dabeet holds little faith in his mother’s claims, but believes that his high intelligence scores and academic merits should be enough to get him accepted. Fleet school may have been repurposed, but its mission remains the same: to recruit the best and the brightest children, and train them to become humanity’s future leaders. Naturally, filled with his own sense of self-importance, Dabeet believes he belongs in this group. Surely, if he sends enough inquiries and writes enough essays, he’s bound to catch someone’s attention. And indeed, one day Dabeet gets a surprise visit. Turning up on his doorstep is none other than Golonel Graff, the man who mentored Ender Wiggin and is now the head of the Ministry of Colonization, the administrative arm that runs Fleet School. However, to Dabeet’s surprise and bewilderment, the meeting doesn’t exactly go as he thought it would. What follows is a story that mirrors Ender’s Game in a lot of ways, but also offers a few new spins on a familiar premise. We are once more thrust into a coming-of-age narrative that takes place in a sci-fi military school setting, but changes have definitely been made now that the alien threat is no more. Additionally, a much greater emphasis is placed on Dabeet’s personal journey and emotional growth, making Children of the Fleet more of a character study than an action-oriented adventure. In other words, the tactical training and battle games take a backseat to our protagonist’s own journey of self-discovery, evaluation, and eventual realization. How you feel about this story will hinge upon how you feel about Dabeet. His character is at the center of this narrative, a singularly unique personality that demonstrates resolve, autonomy, and intelligence—all traits that should make him a natural leader, except he possesses not a shred of humility or social grace. Arguably, he is unlikeable by design. Exceptional even among the other gifted students at his school on Earth, Dabeet never met an intellectual challenge he couldn’t conquer, filling him with overconfidence and pride. He also has few friends, believing himself superior over others. His entire worldview is shaken, however, once he arrives at Fleet School and discovers just how average he is, surrounded by his fellow cadets who are equally talented, if not more so, than himself. Gradually, Dabeet realizes he must overcome his flaws in order to succeed, even if that also means forging relationships and working with others. Although I never did warm to Dabeet, the later sections of the book showing his efforts to change his ways and become something more admittedly did make me feel more sympathetic towards his character. There’s also a background situation involving a conspiracy which our protagonist must try to uncover before his time runs out, and I found myself rooting for him to succeed. That said, I wouldn’t say I was riveted by this story because it was rather tame and slow to build (not to mention, we’re never given the full answers behind what is happening at MinCol even by the end of the book). At the same time though, I loved the greater focus on character building and development. Finally, because this novel is all about Dabeet, I found that I was able to jump into this book with minimal knowledge of the Enderverse and still follow along with no problems. All told, I thought Children of the Fleet did a great job presenting a different point of view, letting us glimpse this post-Formic Wars universe through the eyes of a fascinating protagonist. Love him or hate him, Dabeet Ochoa is the kind of character who will stick in your mind, and hopefully his addition to this saga will open up many doors to future possibilities and new horizons.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Preston

    Another disappointing novel by Orson Scott Card I really enjoyed Ender's game and a few of the novels with Bean as the protagonist. Unfortunately, this novel seems like yet another novel that is trying to build off Ender's game with little success. This book overall just feels like as boring side story that could have been fifty pages long but was meticulously extended enough to warrant another book. Fool that I am I like to finish a series I start but for those that liked Ender's game I recomme Another disappointing novel by Orson Scott Card I really enjoyed Ender's game and a few of the novels with Bean as the protagonist. Unfortunately, this novel seems like yet another novel that is trying to build off Ender's game with little success. This book overall just feels like as boring side story that could have been fifty pages long but was meticulously extended enough to warrant another book. Fool that I am I like to finish a series I start but for those that liked Ender's game I recommend you stop there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Olson

    Another entry in the Ender's Game universe. The story takes up shortly after the third formic war. We see how Battle School has been repurposed, the effects of Achille's plots from a different angle, and for the first time get a much better sense of who Hiram Graff is, or at least, wishes he was. There are a few continuity errors in the text (for example the main character is said in one scene to lack micro-expressions, and a few chapters later the author explicitly mentions his microexpressions Another entry in the Ender's Game universe. The story takes up shortly after the third formic war. We see how Battle School has been repurposed, the effects of Achille's plots from a different angle, and for the first time get a much better sense of who Hiram Graff is, or at least, wishes he was. There are a few continuity errors in the text (for example the main character is said in one scene to lack micro-expressions, and a few chapters later the author explicitly mentions his microexpressions giving away a lie). Recommended for: Fans of the Ender-verse.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    We've heard this story four times already, and nothing of value is added to the Enderverse. "Genius kid" has been over milked now and it's time for the series to end.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brent Ecenbarger

    The Enderverse continues to do best when starting a new branch of books. Much like Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Earth Unaware, Card tells a straight forward story with genius characters overcoming difficult situations for the first time. I can only assume the sequels to this book will also drop in quality and becoming increasingly redundant (like the other books' sequels did) but at least we're off to a good start. Taking place after Ender's Game but before the end the the Ender's Shadow sag The Enderverse continues to do best when starting a new branch of books. Much like Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Earth Unaware, Card tells a straight forward story with genius characters overcoming difficult situations for the first time. I can only assume the sequels to this book will also drop in quality and becoming increasingly redundant (like the other books' sequels did) but at least we're off to a good start. Taking place after Ender's Game but before the end the the Ender's Shadow saga, the famed battle school that trained Ender Wiggins has now been rebranded the Fleet School where child geniuses and the children of members of the fleet train to lead colonization missions in the future. As far as humanity knows, we've won the Formic Wars and the threat is over, but readers of the Ender's Shadow books will be aware that unrest on the planet is going to affect everybody. The protagonist of Children of the Fleet is Dabeet Ochoa, a ten year old genius who doesn't know the true identity of his father and who believes almost none of what his mother tells him. When he gets recruited to go to Fleet School, before he can go he is kidnapped by terrorists who hatch a plot with him to eventually have Dabeet be the mole inside Fleet School that will allow them to infiltrate for some sinister purpose. They threaten to kill Dabeet's mother if he doesn't help. Once Dabeet goes to Fleet School, the book is pretty split between him trying to acclimate himself to fleet school and trying to figure out a way to stop the terrorist plot. Dabeet is not as easy to root for as Ender (who was an all time great protagonist) or even Bean (at least in the early books) but I did prefer him to the plucky space miner kid from the prequel books. Dabeet is written as arrogant and it's something he becomes aware of and tries to overcome throughout the book. The supporting cast was not particularly memorable with the exception of Monkey, a girl who is an expert at maneuvering outside in zero gravity. Fans of the whole series will enjoy cameos here by several prominent characters from the other books. ***Spoilers follow*** In addition to Colonel Graff who is a main character in the book, characters like Ender, Bean, Achilles and Mazur all either show up or are heavily referenced. For the most part that's good, except I never cared for Achilles so his showing up didn't invoke nostalgia for better books like the others did. Also the twist involving Graff seemed unnecessary and made Dabeet seem less interesting than leaving the issue open. ***End of Spoilers*** The series as a whole is definitely getting unwieldy, as there's currently another prequel series still being written (The Hive, The Queen, The Swarm), as well as another Shadow book on the way in addition to this midquel book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    George

    I certainly hope that Orson doesn’t object when I quote him, but he sets the stage for his new series best: “Battle School has been re-purposed: It is now Fleet School, serving the brightest children from the International Fleet and the families and corporations that mine and manufacture in space, training leaders for the colony ships heading out from Earth to all the terraformed Formic worlds.” In short – he has a WINNER. Dabeet Ochoa, a genius level, arrogant 10-year old stand-out even in a sc I certainly hope that Orson doesn’t object when I quote him, but he sets the stage for his new series best: “Battle School has been re-purposed: It is now Fleet School, serving the brightest children from the International Fleet and the families and corporations that mine and manufacture in space, training leaders for the colony ships heading out from Earth to all the terraformed Formic worlds.” In short – he has a WINNER. Dabeet Ochoa, a genius level, arrogant 10-year old stand-out even in a school for the gifted, seemingly has exhausted all avenues to be accepted to Fleet School, where he just knows he belongs, when he is kidnapped. He plays along with the kidnapper’s proposal to secure his release and, you guessed it, is ultimately accepted to Fleet School where he must figure out how to do what he has agreed to and yet protect the School by thwarting what he knows to be coming. It is not made any easier by the fact that he is a loner who doesn’t make friends, has never before been off-planet, and what needs to be done cannot be done alone. Ender Wiggin removed the primary need for Battle School, defeat of the Formics, but aren’t the skills of a military leader pretty much the same as those of an expedition leader charged with survival of the human race via establishment of non-terrestrial colonies? You bet. Perhaps the Minister of Colonization has ulterior motives. You decide. This is an AWESOME read, following Dabeet, as he evolves and addresses the problem with which he is faced, particularly knowing that this is but the first volume of a new series by an exceptionally gifted mind. Join me. ENJOY.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nick Jones

    I wanted to like this, but compared to the rest of the Enderverse it was on the lower end of spectrum. Still lightyears ahead of the crapstorm of Shadows in Flight, but nowhere near the quality of the rest of the (great) books either. The first 80% of the book was simply "blah," with an unlikeable main character and a plot that wasn't compelling. It's almost as if OSC decided to have a big reveal with one of the series' main characters, and quickly came up with a story to make it happen.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Swenson

    This was OK. But if you, an author, repeatedly include passages of unattributed dialogue that are pages long, you are just being annoying.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    (better on audio) In the time after Ender Wiggins, Bean, et all have won the last Formic Wars Battle School has become a Fleet school that is training young geniuses to lead colony expeditions at some point. Down on earth, Dabeet is frustrated and bored, so he uses his mother's passwords, takes all of the tests for every better gifted school and for the Fleet School, beating Ender's scores (but of course, not Bean's). But Dabeet isn't sure if his mother is even telling the truth about his father (better on audio) In the time after Ender Wiggins, Bean, et all have won the last Formic Wars Battle School has become a Fleet school that is training young geniuses to lead colony expeditions at some point. Down on earth, Dabeet is frustrated and bored, so he uses his mother's passwords, takes all of the tests for every better gifted school and for the Fleet School, beating Ender's scores (but of course, not Bean's). But Dabeet isn't sure if his mother is even telling the truth about his father being an officer of the fleet; he is sure she is lying to save face. Suffice to say, without giving any spoilers whatsoever, is that Orson Scott Card has developed an new super genius with his own challenges ahead of him, both in personal growth and anything he ends up doing, and since this has been tagged/shelved Space by at least a half a dozen users, this is absolutely integral to the plot in one way or another.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Lovas

    An interesting read and a good addition to the enderverse.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    Originally reviewed for YA Books Central: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti... 3.5 Stars A fresh new story the Ender’s Game universe—this smart military-esque sci-fi is appealing to longtime fans, without alienating new explorers. With the Formic Wars behind them and exploration/colonization now at the forefront of humanity’s drive, Battle School has been converted into Fleet School—a softer, less competitive version of the child prodigy training environment from Ender Wiggin’s day. But there Originally reviewed for YA Books Central: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti... 3.5 Stars A fresh new story the Ender’s Game universe—this smart military-esque sci-fi is appealing to longtime fans, without alienating new explorers. With the Formic Wars behind them and exploration/colonization now at the forefront of humanity’s drive, Battle School has been converted into Fleet School—a softer, less competitive version of the child prodigy training environment from Ender Wiggin’s day. But there is still the looming concern that some of the Formics may have survived the extinction-aiming assault on their homeworld. And so, it’s become clear the best hope for humanity is to spread humankind out among the stars. Children Of The Fleet is told largely from the POV of Dabeet Ochoa, a coolly rational child genius who longs to escape his mother’s overbearing love for him by making it into Fleet School. But despite his stellar test scores, his chances seem slim. Until his mother’s claims of his father being a member of the Fleet turns out to be more than wishful-thinking. But Dabeet quickly discovers that reality doesn’t quite fit his hopes, just as he finds himself caught up in the kidnapping and sabotage schemes of an unknown foe. I spent most of this book unable to decide if I liked Dabeet or not. He wasn’t awful… but wasn’t particularly endearing, either. He’s no Ender Wiggins, that much is plain. His disposition was a lot more cold, self-centered, and cowardly. (I’m all for characters having flaws and issues they need to grow through, but there were perhaps too few redeeming qualities here for my usual liking.) Although, I also didn’t agree with all the adults in this story who seemed to think Dabeet’s ego was unbearably obnoxious. Instead, I thought he came across as both a confident and over-cautious savant. (i.e. If he wasn’t immediately good at something, he abandoned investing his time and energy into it.) It was almost as though he were on the high-functioning end of the autism spectrum. But rather than having a high Intelligence Quotient paired with low social intelligence, Dabeet had simply never put much effort into understanding the internal and emotional lives of others. While there wasn’t too much by way of humor, I did laugh out loud over this little interaction: “I’m not from your culture,” said Dabeet. “The flavor of kuso remains a mystery to me.” "Kuso' means 'shit,'" said the boy. "I knew what it meant," said Dabeet. You couldn't be in Fleet School for three days without getting a full vocabulary dump of all the offensive slang. "I just lacked your firsthand knowledge of how it tasted." He gave the boy his best grin. The kind of grin, Dabeet realized, that several books he'd read described as "shit-eating." What a happy confluence of fecal references. --------- To some extent, Dabeet is a protagonist who doesn’t know how to pro-tag. Things happen to him, and then he flounders around—afraid to make any definitive move. Most of the plot involves him coming to understand this fact. Fortunately, the chemistry between him and the outreaching characters of Zhang and Monkey brought a lot more flavor to the story arch. And fortunately for everyone, facilitated some much-needed development—starting with Zhang at about 1/3rd of the way in. It took me most of the book, but I think I figured out why I wasn’t connecting as well with this story as I did with Ender's Game. It's not because of a lack of Ender (we actually had a guest appearance of him—er…auditory attendance?—and it didn't do anything for me). It's not even that I found Dabeet difficult to empathize with. It was the overall lack of emotion, both visceral and expressed. I felt as though I was watching passively instead of being invested. Almost as though an enriching layer was missing. I truly liked the finale, however. The character growth was long in coming but refreshing to finally see. The resolution was both intriguing and satisfying. It answered most questions, while leaving a few open for future installments.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    Most of us can't read Orson Scott Card without some baggage. Mine comes in 3 sacks: 1. The joy of reading Ender's Game as a young teen. We got to study real sci-fi in school! It was fun. It was relatable. It felt original and cool. The sequels weren't all great, but they were interesting and kept a story going that I didn't want to end. 2. The horror of reading Card's Book of Mormon in Space series (whose real title I don't recall) a couple of years later. I didn't get every reference, but I knew Most of us can't read Orson Scott Card without some baggage. Mine comes in 3 sacks: 1. The joy of reading Ender's Game as a young teen. We got to study real sci-fi in school! It was fun. It was relatable. It felt original and cool. The sequels weren't all great, but they were interesting and kept a story going that I didn't want to end. 2. The horror of reading Card's Book of Mormon in Space series (whose real title I don't recall) a couple of years later. I didn't get every reference, but I knew it was mostly trash with a side of rollicking adventure. I had a hint this guy wasn't just writing for fun, but for a Higher Purpose I didn't appreciate or enjoy. 3. Card's personal politics/religious zealotry/books that are mere vehicles for bigotry and fundamentalism. I learned more about this when the Ender's Game movie came out and was appalled. I tried reading a contemporary thriller (whose title, again, I can't recall) and practically trashed it. So it's fair to say I came to this book expecting it to carry me back to #1 to such a degree that I'd forget about the latter developments. It failed, and not because it is heavily ideological or quite as poorly written as those other books. It failed because it was boring. Nothing about Dabeet Ochoa is inspiring or relatable. He's a genius who doesn't know anything about people. Wow, how original! His "adventures" at Fleet School lack gravity or suspense. He spends a bunch of time literally crawling, which reflects the pace of this story. His cultural pool is shallow and his friends carbon copies of the Ender crew. I didn't realize until I looked it up on Goodreads that this is intended to be the first in a new series, but no wonder. If it had been condensed as the first couple of chapters of a novel about a kid who actually grows up and solves his origin mystery and goes on to do something great, maybe I'd be giving it a third star. As is, it's a solid "shrug."

  15. 4 out of 5

    kerrycat

    and may I say what an incredible honor it is to professionally review the great OSC - seriously. (I gave this four stars in the RTBR October edition: https://www.rtbookreviews.com/book-re...) ard delivers the kind of fast-paced space adventure for which he is known, as well as the character development and relational conflict fans of Ender’s Game will appreciate. Readers new to Card or the Enderverse will have no trouble following Dabeet’s exploits, although Graff’s history lends an added dimensi and may I say what an incredible honor it is to professionally review the great OSC - seriously. (I gave this four stars in the RTBR October edition: https://www.rtbookreviews.com/book-re...) ard delivers the kind of fast-paced space adventure for which he is known, as well as the character development and relational conflict fans of Ender’s Game will appreciate. Readers new to Card or the Enderverse will have no trouble following Dabeet’s exploits, although Graff’s history lends an added dimension to his role as his new protégé’s guide. This new series will appeal to young adult science fiction fans as well as adults, particularly as an important secret continues to be withheld from Dabeet at the end of the novel. Brilliant fifth grader Dabeet longs to leave his controlling mother and attend Fleet School to pursue his goal of becoming a space explorer and colonizer. When Minister of Colonization Hyrum Graff, famous for recruiting Ender Wiggin, shows up on his doorstep after Dabeet has secretly applied, he is stunned by Graff’s revelations. While Dabeet might be qualified intellectually, his interpersonal skills are sorely lacking, a problem that must be resolved when a raid threatens the school and the safety of the students. Learning how to make and keep friends and value their contributions is as important as anything else he might learn on the training ground, but can Dabeet overcome his manipulative tendencies in order to make his dream of a career in space come true?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    Children of the Fleet is the newest book based on the world most famous for Ender’s Game. As far as continuity is concerned, Children of the Fleet occurs after the third Formic War, but before humans have been able to confirm whether or not another war is on the way (as in, they have no idea if it’ll happen again). Despite being unsure if there’s another war on the horizon, the Battle School has been altered into the Fleet School, with the sole purpose being to raise commanders (as opposed to m Children of the Fleet is the newest book based on the world most famous for Ender’s Game. As far as continuity is concerned, Children of the Fleet occurs after the third Formic War, but before humans have been able to confirm whether or not another war is on the way (as in, they have no idea if it’ll happen again). Despite being unsure if there’s another war on the horizon, the Battle School has been altered into the Fleet School, with the sole purpose being to raise commanders (as opposed to mass numbers of soldiers). Full disclosure: I’m actually not fully caught up in Orson Scott Card’s works, and haven’t read any of the Formic Wars novels yet. Despite this I had no trouble keeping up with Children of the Fleet and quite enjoyed it. I think having read Ender’s Game first is probably a good idea, if not a requirement (you won’t understand the MinCol’s personality otherwise). Reading Ender’s Shadow first is also a good idea, but slightly less of a concern. (view spoiler)[ Children of the Fleet in many ways feels like Ender’s Game all over again, just with a new character. But that isn’t quite the truth of it; Dabeet Ochoa is a wildly different character from Ender, and equally as different from Bean. Dabeet is brilliant, yes, but not to the same level as Bean. He’s also no fighter like Ender, or as clever with strategies as him either. He is test smart though, and witty. Like the other boys, Dabeet is flawed in his own way (or really at all). He’s arrogant, small (too small to be a confident fighter), he doesn’t socialize well, and he is behind in almost everything compared to the rest of the Fleet students (with the obvious exception of testing). Despite the similarities between the three books, don’t go into Children of the Fleet expecting to be reading the same book with a slight twist. This novel is much more focused on dialogue and Dabeet’s coming of age sort of story. There will be no dramatic battles in the battleroom like with Ender, and no sneaking around in the vents like Bean (Dabeet is small, but he isn’t that small). This is Dabeet’s story, through and through. Dabeet’s character growth was probably one of the best parts about this book. He starts off as a brilliant but petulant child, convinced he’s smarter and therefore better than everyone around him. By the end he’s, well I wouldn’t say humble but certainly more modest and more appreciative of what he has (like his new found friends). Over the course of the book we see Dabeet constantly learn to self-analyze and see the faults in himself. It isn’t until the end that he learns that faults aren’t a bad thing; it just means he has more work to do. Adding on to all of this is seeing Dabeet struggle to figure out how friends and friendships work. He thinks he’s found a friend in Zhang He, but he isn’t quite sure. Zhang He is willing to point out flaws and tease him, something Dabeet isn’t expecting or really prepared for. Adding to this difficulty is the way Dabeet communicates; he has no problem telling a kid when he’s wrong, or talking to him like he’s unintelligent. He’s braggy (behind his back he is called Test Boy) and doesn’t take criticism well. Thinking the friendship is lost, but accepting a level of mutual respect between them, Dabeet assumes that’s all he’ll ever have. Until Monkey (not her real name, but Fleet School keeps up the tradition of nicknames). She’s good at getting through to Dabeet, and makes up for many of the social skills Dabeet lacks. She’s ok with calling him out when he’s being rude or selfish or any other adjective he’s fitting at the moment. With her help Dabeet really does figure out what a friendship entails; the hardest element for him being trust. What I really loved about Children of the Fleet was all of the mind games that were going on. Each character had their own spin on things, their own way of seeing the world that added to the complexity of the full view of it. Whenever one set of circumstances is presented, we’re immediately shown the alternative ways of interpreting it, or how the lack of information provided could mean countless other scenarios. The puzzle Dabeet gets himself trapped in isn’t a simple one, and it takes the entire Building Team to resolve it (heaven forbid the adults step in and resolve things, as per usual with Battle/Fleet School). I really enjoyed reading Children of the Fleet, it was a fascinating character study and stratagem story. As a bonus, diving back into the world Orson Scott Card has created has motivated me to continue with getting caught up with the rest of the series, something I hope to do shortly. (hide spoiler)] For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  17. 4 out of 5

    LindaJ^

    A new edition to Enderverse. I am a fan of the Ender and Shadow series. Ender's Game is one of my all time favorite science fiction books. I've read it in print and audio more than once and always enjoy it. This book is not in the same class of book as Ender's Game but it is still an enjoyable read. Those who love the Ender and Shadow books should enjoy it. I will read more in the series when published. Much of the enjoyment of this book, I think, requires being familiar with the Ender and Shado A new edition to Enderverse. I am a fan of the Ender and Shadow series. Ender's Game is one of my all time favorite science fiction books. I've read it in print and audio more than once and always enjoy it. This book is not in the same class of book as Ender's Game but it is still an enjoyable read. Those who love the Ender and Shadow books should enjoy it. I will read more in the series when published. Much of the enjoyment of this book, I think, requires being familiar with the Ender and Shadow series. It assumes the reader knows what happened with the Formic Wars and knows who Achilles is, as well as who Hyrum Graff is and who he might be talking to in the material that does not concern the day-to-day life of the start of the new series -- 10-year old Dabeet Ochoa. Ochoa scored higher on all the tests than Andrew Wiggin (but not as high as Bean), the hero of the Third Formic Wars. He is an arrogant little prick, has no friends, and wants to get into Fleet School (the school for the kids of Fleet members that has replaced Battle School). His "mother" claims his father was a member of the Fleet and he wants what he deserves - entry to Fleet School. As the result of a rather unbelievable kidnapping escapade, Ochoa is able to get his wish. Of course, he is scorned by the team he is placed with at Fleet School. They call him Test Boy, as he never lets anyone forget about his scores. But then the kidnapping is back to haunt and plague him. Too quickly, Ochoa begins to self-access and mend his ways to become the "hero" of the day. At first I gave this book 4 stars, probably because I was so glad to be back in Enderverse. But as I wrote the review, I realized it does not deserve 4 stars. But still, I enjoyed the story and it will join the other Enderverse books on my shelf.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd Andrew Green

    A few years ago, I was blown away by Orson Scott Card’s classic, Ender’s Game. Since then, I’ve been in search of any book, which added life to the Enderverse and I wasn’t disappointed. Seems there are seven books in the Ender series (about the further adventures of Ender Wiggin). Then there’s five novels that make up the Shadow saga about another brilliant kid from Battle school named Bean. His stories run parallel to Ender’s and delve into Bean’s efforts to help save Earth from the aliens (or A few years ago, I was blown away by Orson Scott Card’s classic, Ender’s Game. Since then, I’ve been in search of any book, which added life to the Enderverse and I wasn’t disappointed. Seems there are seven books in the Ender series (about the further adventures of Ender Wiggin). Then there’s five novels that make up the Shadow saga about another brilliant kid from Battle school named Bean. His stories run parallel to Ender’s and delve into Bean’s efforts to help save Earth from the aliens (or Formics) and itself. Sprinkled throughout these twelve books is the history of Ender’s and Bean’s families and how they intersect. Add to this mix, three books about the First Formic Wars (long before Ender’s birth) and a one novel (so far) about the Second Formic War. There are two more in this series that have not yet been published. Reading Orson Scott Cards work is always an intellectual experience with plot twists and well-rounded character development. Needless to say, I was overjoyed when I found that Children of the Fleet was available (which is set right after the events of the original Ender’ Game). I was quite excited to start reading but that was about the height of my excitement. Without hitting any spoilers, the story is about ten-year old Dabeet Ochoa who has the potential to become a great military strategist. The problem with the story begins once Dabeet is aboard the Battle Station (which is now a Fleet School for children training to be planetary explorers). At times, the characters conversations are repetitive and their thoughts are too long and drawn out. When Dabeet is faced with a particular life-and death training, a few pages are used to describe the young boy’s thoughts when a few paragraphs would have been sufficient. The bottom line is that there is so much unnecessary detail that it becomes boring. Perhaps Card is simply setting the stage for this new character to begin his adventures in possible new sequels but as a stand alone novel, Children of the Fleet is disappointing. Overall, the storyline is okay but not up to the level of the other series mentioned. I give the novel three stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    Make no mistake, I enjoyed reading this. But it's not a good book. Ender Wiggin. Bean. Mazer Rackham. Achilles. And now Dabeet Ochoa. Around we go again with the Boy Genius giving Card a reason to lecture us on something. This time it's leadership, which of course has been heavily examined already in this universe. I don't have any quarrel with what Card says here, and readers who haven't studied leadership might find it fascinating. Speaking of Achilles: c'mon, was it 2002 he appeared. I've read Make no mistake, I enjoyed reading this. But it's not a good book. Ender Wiggin. Bean. Mazer Rackham. Achilles. And now Dabeet Ochoa. Around we go again with the Boy Genius giving Card a reason to lecture us on something. This time it's leadership, which of course has been heavily examined already in this universe. I don't have any quarrel with what Card says here, and readers who haven't studied leadership might find it fascinating. Speaking of Achilles: c'mon, was it 2002 he appeared. I've read a few other books since then, give me some back story to remind me. The bad guys' plot is slapdash and implausible. The battle-room stuff with the walls was, about six words in, labeled Note This, It Will Matter Later; and it did, in a badly forced way. There's a lot of explaining, yet a lot of stuff that could/should have been explained but wasn't; that's usually a sign of Author Is Saving It For Volume Seven, and that's bad. I am OK with Dabeet's journey of self-discovery, especially the later parts where he had to do things he wasn't sure he could do. I am really tired of the puppet-masters in the background, like something out of Doc Smith of the Greek gods.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Travis Jackson

    I'm sure that there will be many who will gripe that this was another attempt to draw out a series that should have been put to rest with the last in the Shadow series. There is some legitimacy behind that, but let's compare this series with the Star Trek and Star Wars franchises. Each has its following, but at least the Ender Universe has stuck to being written by Card and Aaron Johnston. Another justifiable critique is that the Second Formic Wars trilogy should have been completed before worry I'm sure that there will be many who will gripe that this was another attempt to draw out a series that should have been put to rest with the last in the Shadow series. There is some legitimacy behind that, but let's compare this series with the Star Trek and Star Wars franchises. Each has its following, but at least the Ender Universe has stuck to being written by Card and Aaron Johnston. Another justifiable critique is that the Second Formic Wars trilogy should have been completed before worrying about starting off on a new tangent. Any way you want to look at it, the novel is here. At least there is one character that you know and potentially like (Graff) and references to one that you probably despise (Achilles). Dabeet Ochoa is a boy trying to find his place in the world or above it. A boy genius that has been shown through the tests to be as smart as Ender himself, but not to the level of Bean. Dabeet will take any chance to remind you of his intelligence as well, letting you understand why he is so unlikeable by the students at Fleet School. There is a plot to destroy Fleet School and a plot by Dabeet to find out who his father is. The chapters begin again with the unidentified voices, leaving you to once again guess who is who, with a little too much confusion. Overall a good story though and it will likely run a new series from the original spin off, but hopefully only after the conclusion of the second formic wars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I gave reading this the "old college try". I had read all of Card's Ender Universe books. Toward the end, I had to really push myself to read them as Card's style got severely preachy. When I got this book I thought it was part of the series of the early Formic Wars, not the Ender ones. But this seems an attempt to resurrect the Ender series. I found it quite boring and uninventive. Dabeet, the main character, seemed to be a theme and variation on Bean. His problems seem too similar to Beans but I gave reading this the "old college try". I had read all of Card's Ender Universe books. Toward the end, I had to really push myself to read them as Card's style got severely preachy. When I got this book I thought it was part of the series of the early Formic Wars, not the Ender ones. But this seems an attempt to resurrect the Ender series. I found it quite boring and uninventive. Dabeet, the main character, seemed to be a theme and variation on Bean. His problems seem too similar to Beans but translated into post Battle School. Dabeet's primary problem seems improbable. There are many good books to read so I stopped reading it. I don't care what happens. The characters seem two-dimensional, and unforgivable sin for a writer of Card's status.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I LOVED the Ender series and I even liked the Shadow series. I was very excited to see where Card was going to take this book knowing it was "part" or a continuation of the Ender series. At times, it was a little tough and probably not as exciting as I remember Ender's Game being. Now that surely doesn't mean this isn't a good book, because it was a decent continuance to what has been set up in the past. In fact, I felt like I knew exactly what was going to happen and yes, it did, but not the wa I LOVED the Ender series and I even liked the Shadow series. I was very excited to see where Card was going to take this book knowing it was "part" or a continuation of the Ender series. At times, it was a little tough and probably not as exciting as I remember Ender's Game being. Now that surely doesn't mean this isn't a good book, because it was a decent continuance to what has been set up in the past. In fact, I felt like I knew exactly what was going to happen and yes, it did, but not the way I was expecting and it almost seemed like it appeared out of nowhere. I look forward to continuing this series as it is perfect for putting the daily grind aside and enjoying something just a little different than regular life.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bob Keeney

    Great continuation of Enders Game. The old Battle School is renamed Fleet School is it no longer teaching kids to be the warriors but now explorers. Debeet Ochoa is a brilliant kid that is a "child of the fleet" though he doesn't know who his father is. He quickly gets caught up in political intrigue as he scores better than Ender (though not as good as Bean) and gets sent to Fleet School. While at Fleet School he learns how to innovate and, more importantly, become a friend to his teammates. Oh, Great continuation of Enders Game. The old Battle School is renamed Fleet School is it no longer teaching kids to be the warriors but now explorers. Debeet Ochoa is a brilliant kid that is a "child of the fleet" though he doesn't know who his father is. He quickly gets caught up in political intrigue as he scores better than Ender (though not as good as Bean) and gets sent to Fleet School. While at Fleet School he learns how to innovate and, more importantly, become a friend to his teammates. Oh, and naturally saves everyone in the process. If you liked the Enders Game universe this is a must read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alyssia Cooke

    I have to admit to being less enthralled with this than others in this universe but that is less due to quality than circumstance. It incorporates hardly any of my favourite characters and if I’m brutally honest, I don’t really engage with any of the new ones in the same way. It’s well written though and has an engaging narrative that all comes together in the last third of the novel with an explosive finale.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charlie F

    Not worthy of the rest Card phoned this one in. Endless, repetitive internal monologue and ruminating by the barely likable main character, with very little actual story. Some of the tie-ins with threads from other books were somewhat interesting, but this could have been a 40 page novella for $0.99. As it is, I wouldn’t expect to pay $12+ for an e-book from an established author whose work I otherwise like, and end up skimming page after page, waiting for something interesting.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maren

    This one was a little hard to read for me, because I didn't empathize with the main character as much as I did for Ender or Bean. There was a lot of inner monologue that I had to trudge through with not a lot of plot.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    What fun to be back in Ender’s universe - and with a guest appearance by Ender too!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Card at his best. Telling stories about gifted, but flawed children.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pascal Schuppli

    I love OSC's early work. But it becomes harder and harder to find meaning in his new ones. I keep reading the new books trying to see if I find some remnant of the old OSC, only to be disappointed. Children of the Fleet is quite possibly his worst book so far. OSC was once known for thoughtful books that depicted deeply imagined characters and through them illuminated ethical questions. Some of his books picked up biblical themes and retold them in the guise of Science Fiction. He wrote fantastic I love OSC's early work. But it becomes harder and harder to find meaning in his new ones. I keep reading the new books trying to see if I find some remnant of the old OSC, only to be disappointed. Children of the Fleet is quite possibly his worst book so far. OSC was once known for thoughtful books that depicted deeply imagined characters and through them illuminated ethical questions. Some of his books picked up biblical themes and retold them in the guise of Science Fiction. He wrote fantastic and witty dialogue and knew exactly how to build suspense. His plots were believable and made sense. This author is gone. His books now feel thin, boring and without a point. Oh, and the plot doesn't make any sense at all. Children of the Fleet tells the story of eleven-year-old Dabeet, whose thought process we get treated to with pages and pages of internal monologue. The aim of the book is to show us Dabeets development from unlikable know-it-all to redeemed, self-aware leader with command-capabilities. Dabeet spends dozens of pages thinking about possible future events, based on exactly nothing. This is what Card seems to assume a genius would do - endlessly thinking about possible outcomes based only on strange assumptions. He wrote the Shadow books the same way; basically Dabeet is a very unlikable clone of Bean. I could live with this (in my eyes) misguided idea about how a genius thinks, if the rest of the book was any good. Ender's Shadow, for example, suffered from the same problem, but at least the surrounding story was fun to read. This isn't the case with CotF. Since most of the book is boring "what-if"-internal monologue, almost all the witty dialogue OSC is so good at is gone. There are no characters besides Dabeet who are worked out in any depth at all - and that's another thing OSC was really good at in the past. So there's nothing funny, and no interesting people to meet in CotF. I get the feeling that OSC wants us to know how deeply he thought about what qualities make a leader, and how effective teams function. Maybe he's right about that, and maybe not, but whatever's the case, it does not make for an interesting read. So what remains is the plot: Is it any good? No, because right from the beginning, it simply makes no sense at all. Also, the main plot sidetracks into subplots that promise interesting developments to come, but these then never materialize - the subplots are just abandoned. Much of the book, while not boring to read (OSC is too good to write really boring stuff), therefore becomes pointless. For example, there is a smuggling subplot that just ditters out and dies (view spoiler)[except that it might help explain why the station commander is removed later on, but that's another thing that grinds: Dabeet finds out early on that the station commander doesn't like him, and *therefore* she must be guilty of smuggling... (hide spoiler)] . Or Dabeet and Monkey explore hitherto unknown parts of the station, but this never becomes important later on. Dabeet spends pages and pages outside the station in a spacesuit climbing around on the station hull (view spoiler)[noticing the Battlerooms are a death trap - why on earth doesn't he ever tell anyone? (hide spoiler)] , and while this gives us a feeling of the terror someone might be subjected to fooling around in space for the first time, the endless description of handles not to let go and body movements to achieve in space just don't do anything to move the actual plot forward. We're left with a single character, Dabeet, thinking about pointless stuff, doing pointless things, running endless loops in the depths of his mind waiting for something to happen. When something relevant finally does happen in the last fifty pages, the book becomes interesting to read (if you manage to suspend your disbelief, that is (view spoiler)[even if you accept the idiotic plan to go to the trouble of bringing an assault team that believes it won't have to shoot children, and then blow up the station with everyone inside, including the assault team, you might find it a tad unlikely that Graff, who knows what's going to happen, actually facilitates it by withdrawing all the adults with authority and station knowledge, and leaves the station defense in charge of children - nevermind that there are still adults aboard who seem to simply go along with whatever the children planned (hide spoiler)] ), but nothing that happened up to that point is relevant for the rest of the story. So, for me, the book fails in every respect.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Haak

    Entertaining book, but not as exciting as others in the series. Had some slow spots.

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