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Didn't Get Frazzled: humorous medical fiction

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“…the best fictional portrayal of med school since ER.” – BlueInk Review (starred) International Book Award Bronze Medal Winner Readers' Favorite (Fiction - Humor/Comedy) INDIES Book of the Year Award Finalist (Humor) Medical student Seth Levine faces escalating stress and gallows humor as he struggles with the collapse of his romantic relationships and al “…the best fictional portrayal of med school since ER.” – BlueInk Review (starred) International Book Award Bronze Medal Winner Readers' Favorite (Fiction - Humor/Comedy) INDIES Book of the Year Award Finalist (Humor) Medical student Seth Levine faces escalating stress and gallows humor as he struggles with the collapse of his romantic relationships and all preconceived notions of what it means to be a doctor. It doesn’t take long before he realizes not getting frazzled is the least of his problems. Seth encounters a student so arrogant he boasts that he’ll eat any cadaver part he can’t name, an instructor so dedicated she tests the student’s ability to perform a gynecological exam on herself, and a woman so captivating that Seth will do whatever it takes to make her laugh, including regale her with a story about a diagnostic squabble over an erection. Didn’t Get Frazzled captures with distressing accuracy the gauntlet idealistic college grads must face to secure an MD and, against the odds, come out of it a better human being. This comedy-drama is an exciting addition to the grand tradition of medical novels by Samuel Shem, Lisa Genova, and Noah Gordon.


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“…the best fictional portrayal of med school since ER.” – BlueInk Review (starred) International Book Award Bronze Medal Winner Readers' Favorite (Fiction - Humor/Comedy) INDIES Book of the Year Award Finalist (Humor) Medical student Seth Levine faces escalating stress and gallows humor as he struggles with the collapse of his romantic relationships and al “…the best fictional portrayal of med school since ER.” – BlueInk Review (starred) International Book Award Bronze Medal Winner Readers' Favorite (Fiction - Humor/Comedy) INDIES Book of the Year Award Finalist (Humor) Medical student Seth Levine faces escalating stress and gallows humor as he struggles with the collapse of his romantic relationships and all preconceived notions of what it means to be a doctor. It doesn’t take long before he realizes not getting frazzled is the least of his problems. Seth encounters a student so arrogant he boasts that he’ll eat any cadaver part he can’t name, an instructor so dedicated she tests the student’s ability to perform a gynecological exam on herself, and a woman so captivating that Seth will do whatever it takes to make her laugh, including regale her with a story about a diagnostic squabble over an erection. Didn’t Get Frazzled captures with distressing accuracy the gauntlet idealistic college grads must face to secure an MD and, against the odds, come out of it a better human being. This comedy-drama is an exciting addition to the grand tradition of medical novels by Samuel Shem, Lisa Genova, and Noah Gordon.

30 review for Didn't Get Frazzled: humorous medical fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nesly Clerge

    What a novel! I truly enjoyed the story in its entirety. David Z Hirsch’s Didn’t get frazzled, presents an engrossing and enthralling, plot-driven narrative, which mesmerizes with its intelligent portrayal of one man’s struggles to survive the trials and tribulations of medical school. The story starts out with a bang, as Seth, a medical student, studies the cadaver directly in front of him. While reading, the story created a reminiscing effect of my days in school, the whirlwind of names and fa What a novel! I truly enjoyed the story in its entirety. David Z Hirsch’s Didn’t get frazzled, presents an engrossing and enthralling, plot-driven narrative, which mesmerizes with its intelligent portrayal of one man’s struggles to survive the trials and tribulations of medical school. The story starts out with a bang, as Seth, a medical student, studies the cadaver directly in front of him. While reading, the story created a reminiscing effect of my days in school, the whirlwind of names and faces, and as we meet each other for the first time, but I digressed. The book is written by a physician, and although fictional, the story echoes the reality that one must face before the word, Doctor, is able to precede one’s name. Seth had to deal with the rigorous environment of a medical curriculum, while concurrently involved in a relationship with his significant other, April. A difficult task indeed. But Seth didn’t get frazzled, he handled everything that was thrown at him, and with grace, I must say. The odds were insurmountable: Clinical rotations, exams, boards, and of course, April. Personally, I didn’t think guys like Seth existed, and without divulging the plot of the story, he should have told her to “Kick Rocks.” Is the story a bit technical? Well, some parts, but I enjoyed every bit of it. Perhaps I’m a bit biased since I’m in the medical field as well. The story is “laugh out loud” hilarious—hysterically funny. The gynecologic exam is by far my favorite scene; Sujay’s discomfiture and inability to be mindful of the female body had me in tears. I thought the writing was straightforward, sharp, and witty. Certainly, a compelling piece of work made for an unforgettable read. I was captivated from the first sentence, the first paragraph, the first page, and Seth’s well-drawn spiral of chaotic-order. The gravity of Seth’s struggles spoke to me, and brought back memories once discarded. It’s not often that we are presented with such fleshed-out and engaging characters, elegant prose, and such whimsical sense of humor. 6 out 5 stars!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Pooler

    As a retired Nursing Practitioner with forty-four years in the health care field, I am drawn to stories of medical professionals in the making. Didn’t Get Frazzled by David Z. Hirsch stands out as an entertaining, enlightening and realistic portrayal of the grueling path one must take to earn their standing as a competent professional. The main character, Seth and his band of cohorts are medical students enduring the trials and tribulations of medical school while also trying to manage the intric As a retired Nursing Practitioner with forty-four years in the health care field, I am drawn to stories of medical professionals in the making. Didn’t Get Frazzled by David Z. Hirsch stands out as an entertaining, enlightening and realistic portrayal of the grueling path one must take to earn their standing as a competent professional. The main character, Seth and his band of cohorts are medical students enduring the trials and tribulations of medical school while also trying to manage the intricacies of their love lives. Hirsch has a distinctive voice, raw, real and at times hilarious. There were times I laughed out loud. But there were also times, when I felt the gravity of the situation as life and death hung in the balance. His characters were believable and multidimensional. They came alive on the page and added a deeper dimension to the stressors endured in the path to becoming a doctor. The story flows at a steady pace through various clinical scenarios, some funny, some sad to the roller coaster ride of twenty-something relationship issues. Back in the day, I dated a medical student so I could relate to the complexities. Through out it all, Seth reigns as the hero, often showing better clinical judgment than the person mentoring him, whether it be an attending or an intern. In that regard, the story lives up to it title, Didn’t Get Frazzled. I’d like to think that any doctor I entrust my care to would have done the same. This story is a vivid glimpse into the life of a medical student. I highly recommend this engaging and enjoyable read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Olga Miret

    Sometimes it's hard to be a doctor I’m reviewing this book on behalf of Rosie’s Book Review Team and thank the author and Rosie for the ARC copy of the book that I voluntarily chose to review. I’m a doctor and I must admit this book brought many memories for me (although I studied Medicine almost ten years earlier than the character Seth in the book and in Barcelona, Spain, where the system of medical training is slightly different to the one in the US that’s portrayed in the book): the shared ex Sometimes it's hard to be a doctor I’m reviewing this book on behalf of Rosie’s Book Review Team and thank the author and Rosie for the ARC copy of the book that I voluntarily chose to review. I’m a doctor and I must admit this book brought many memories for me (although I studied Medicine almost ten years earlier than the character Seth in the book and in Barcelona, Spain, where the system of medical training is slightly different to the one in the US that’s portrayed in the book): the shared experiences (some pleasant, some not so much), the trials, the discoveries, the surprises, the stress, the uncertainty… I’m sure anybody who’s studied and/or worked in a health-related field will be able to identify with much of the books’ content, especially the struggle between the need to offer the best care and the reality of what is available and how specific services work. Not all patients are patient, not all colleagues are helpful, and no matter how hard we try, things don’t always work out. The story is told in the first person from the point of view of Seth, who has always wanted to be a doctor and manages to get into Medical School in New York. His long-term girlfriend, April, goes with him, and they hope that being together will help them both survive the experience, but that proves not to the case. Trying to juggle the pressures of Medical School (that with the regular schedule, on-calls and studying leave little time for personal life, especially if the significant other is not another medical student) and a relationship that is changing proves complicated, and when the relationship ends, Seth finds it difficult to move on. Whilst Seth, the medical student, is usually successful at navigating the intricacies of his training, acquiring knowledge, and trying to deal with both patients and staff, Seth, the man, has more difficulty managing his emotions. He relies on his friends, explores relationships (some that confuse matters even more) and by the end, might have found somebody new. When one of his trainers says of him that he doesn’t get frazzled, he decides to adopt it as his motto, and he manages to live up to it, at least in appearance, most of the time. But he has moments when things get too much for him and then his coping mechanisms are not always the best. He goes above and beyond his duty for the patients and we’re sure he’ll make a good doctor, but he’s far from perfect and only a human being, after all. We see him interact with some of this friends too, most of them medical students as well, and that offers us different perspectives on the effect the training has and on how it affects people’s lives. It also allows us to see him in a more relaxed environment and get a better sense of what kind of person Seth is. The plot, such as it is, is the process of transformation of a somewhat naïve student into a doctor, more or less ready to face professional life and it follows the chronology of his studies, from first year eager student to an experienced third year who’s teaching others. There are amusing (although some readers might find some of them gross) episodes, some to do with medical school and others with everyday life (cockroaches and mice included). There are also some sad and touching moments and some inspiring and reflective observations. At a time when medical care and its provision is a matter of much debate, this book, that illustrates the experience from the perspective of those directly engaged in providing it, can help personalise the issue and return the focus where it should be, patients and the caring professionals. As I am a doctor, I’m not in the best position to comment how much of the material might be too specialised and medically-based for the general readership to enjoy. A fair amount of the book consists of following medical students through training, be it studying anatomy, attending post-mortem examinations, going through a very special gynaecological examination training, and also descriptions of cases they have to treat (many among the less privileged echelons of society). Due to this, I would not recommend this book to readers who don’t enjoy books with a medical background, and in my opinion, it is more detailed than what is usually found in TV medical series or some fiction such as medical mysteries. This is a well-written book that gives a very good idea of what life as a medical student in the US is (or at least was in the 1990s). The characters and the anecdotes have a realistic feel and it will be particularly appreciated by those in the health professions or considering them as an option.  Readers who enjoy medical fiction would gain a better understanding of the realities behind the fiction by reading this book. Not recommended for people who are squeamish but it will be an inspiring read for many.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mel

    I received a free copy of Didn't Get Frazzled in exchange for an honest review. I loved this! I don't tend to read or watch anything overly medical, so being honest, I was unsure how I was going to get on with this. But the characters and their lives mixed perfectly with the medical terms and procedures in an all-round enjoyable and engrossing read. They say write what you know, and this is definitely what David Hirsch has done. I don't think it would be possible to write about the medical terms a I received a free copy of Didn't Get Frazzled in exchange for an honest review. I loved this! I don't tend to read or watch anything overly medical, so being honest, I was unsure how I was going to get on with this. But the characters and their lives mixed perfectly with the medical terms and procedures in an all-round enjoyable and engrossing read. They say write what you know, and this is definitely what David Hirsch has done. I don't think it would be possible to write about the medical terms and procedures with such confidence and make it so easy for the reader by doing research alone. The descriptions were vivid and no holds barred, but that made the book all the more realistic. From a lay persons perspective, this appeared to be an accurate insight. The characters were well written and authentic, even the patients who were only mentioned for a matter of pages. There was good, realistically paced character development of Seth and the other main characters. I would be intrigued to know how Seth gets on with his career, possibly even training a new generation of medical students? I could definitely see this working as a TV series. A very well written novel, a very solid 5*. The best book I have since probably Summer 2016. I would be incredibly interested in reading anything else by David Hirsch.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sashi Aggarwal

    Not like House of God, in a good way. For medical students, House of God is practically required reading, but I could never stomach the brutal misogyny and exploitative scenes. To my relief, Didn’t Get Frazzled more accurately represents the multicultural world of medicine with strong female and racially diverse characters. There’s also a realistic portrayal of social issues and the dating scene (as I know well, unfortunately for me). This book is a lot of fun and frequently challenged my views on Not like House of God, in a good way. For medical students, House of God is practically required reading, but I could never stomach the brutal misogyny and exploitative scenes. To my relief, Didn’t Get Frazzled more accurately represents the multicultural world of medicine with strong female and racially diverse characters. There’s also a realistic portrayal of social issues and the dating scene (as I know well, unfortunately for me). This book is a lot of fun and frequently challenged my views on ethics, love, and doctor-patient relationships. I loved how it captured the essence of medical school: “Like most newby third years, I had shed all pretentions and embraced my inner ineptitude.” (Exactly.) “I watched in awe while the pediatrician worked the baby’s hips as if she were deboning a chicken.” (So funny! I was horrified the first time I saw a pediatrician check a newborn for hip dysphasia.) The writing is breezy and the dialogue rings true. This is an easy read (except emotionally). Highly recommended. 4.5 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    ‘Despite the carnage, I enjoyed that collective post-apocalypse cooperation New Yorkers save for special occasions.’ Author David Z. Hirsch, MD is a practicing physician in Maryland. And that is but the first entertaining conundrum that flows like flatus from this novel: the author is a physician – David Z. Hirsch MD is a nom de plume. And after a brief but hilarious take on a bio we get the idea that this is one gifted comedian and that what will follow is a medical tale that is created in juxta ‘Despite the carnage, I enjoyed that collective post-apocalypse cooperation New Yorkers save for special occasions.’ Author David Z. Hirsch, MD is a practicing physician in Maryland. And that is but the first entertaining conundrum that flows like flatus from this novel: the author is a physician – David Z. Hirsch MD is a nom de plume. And after a brief but hilarious take on a bio we get the idea that this is one gifted comedian and that what will follow is a medical tale that is created in juxtaposition to a ‘life story is considerably more prosaic, but in his head he lives a fascinating, fascinating life.’ Though all readers will find this novel entertaining and at times illuminating, few will enjoy the content more than physicians. This book is a trek through the tribulations of medical school – that long but fascinating journey toward becoming an MD. Why the author opted for a pen name he explained in an interview – ‘I’m a practicing physician, so I’d prefer to keep my professional and writing lives separate. There’s also a certain freedom to anonymity. I have an intense job, and writing gives me the opportunity to decompress. Really, in what other endeavor can you just make things up for fun? Go ahead and try that in any other field and you’ll be branded a liar or a criminal. Yet not only is that okay as a novelist, it’s encouraged. Readers want to be whisked away to explore another world. We want to laugh and cry and dig our nails into our Kindles and iPads. I hope Didn’t Get Frazzled will do that for my readers.’ And to explain the content he adds, ‘Most medical students are in their twenties and life has a way of refusing to be put on hold for 4 years. Medial school changes a person. Old relationships need to adjust or break, and new relationships spring up in unexpected ways. The stressful environment only serves to intensify everything. This can be traumatic to live through, but it sets the stage for a great story.’ So where is the magic intrinsic in this dissection of the medical school experience? In the hands of our author it comes out like this – ‘ A beautiful slice of dead penis - “I will eat anything that I can’t name.” I looked over, but I knew only John Hunter would say something that vain. Sure enough, I saw him, grungy even for a medical student, pressed up against his corpulent cadaver, gloved hands raised as if he were about to demonstrate complex surgery for our edification. A crowd gathered, and I moved away from my own cadaver for an impromptu study break. “You point it out, and if I can’t name it -- I’ll eat it.” He punctuated his boast with a perfunctory shrug. John had to be the smartest twit I’d ever met. I had no idea why he would want to rile us all up, but I’d never known him to waste brain space with extraneous trifles like empathy. Of course no one took him up on his offer. We all knew there weren’t any body parts he didn’t know, the guy was ridiculously brilliant. His conceit mocked the group. Stressed-out students converged before him more like a mob than an audience. “Vessels, organs, muscles, nerves -- take your pick,” John continued. “If I get it wrong, it becomes my late night snack.” The grumbling of the crowd sounded ominous. We’d all been there for hours, inhaling the vapors that effused from our pickled cadavers, our fingers pruned beneath two or three layers of gloves, our nerves unraveling while each hour brought us ever closer to our final gross anatomy exam. I decided to poke a hole in John’s proposal if only to create a release. “You’ll eat any body part or just the one you get wrong?” He hesitated before answering. “Just the one.” Dismissive murmurings filled the air. Just the one?’ And after rollicking through this exceptionally well-written book, the author opines, ‘To my medical student readers out there, let me say this. Don’t worry. It gets better. Well, not right away since you have to do an internship next, but after that. Soon. Sooner than you think. Hang in there. I love all my readers and I hope everyone has a positive experience with my book, but I want medical students to recognize that you are not alone. We all go through the same thing. And if you need any more encouraging words to get you through your next exam or your next rotation, send me an email. Often it helps just to write something down.’ Seems like we’ve encountered another superb member of the Literary Elite. This is one fine book. Highly Recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura Ruetz

    This book was full of humor. For a fictional account of what it was like to be in med school, it was refreshingly light and engaging as a read. The author has a great voice for storytelling while blending it with scenarios that you can see happening. Seth is so relatable and likable, that you are just drawn to him and his experiences and the matter of fact way that he narrates his journey in medical school. You don't have to be a doctor or work in the health care industry to enjoy this book. I This book was full of humor. For a fictional account of what it was like to be in med school, it was refreshingly light and engaging as a read. The author has a great voice for storytelling while blending it with scenarios that you can see happening. Seth is so relatable and likable, that you are just drawn to him and his experiences and the matter of fact way that he narrates his journey in medical school. You don't have to be a doctor or work in the health care industry to enjoy this book. I received a free copy of this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Grant

    Medical school is crazy lumped upon crazy, a feeling David Hirsch captures well in Didn’t Get Frazzled. Seth Levine is trying to survive medschool, something made more complicated by potential romance, odd teachers, and even stranger classmates. Hirsch finds that sweet balance between quirky humor and touching drama making Didn’t Get Frazzled perfect for Scrubs or ER fans alike!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Minx

    I like to challenge myself from time to time to step out and read something new. I have never read a medical fiction book before, which Didn’t Get Frazzled truly is. This story follows around Seth Levine as he navigates the world of being a medical student in New York City. This book is set in the early ninety’s and is written with the right proportions between all the medical jargon and Seth’s personal life. Seth is fresh into medical school with a skip in his step. He is so sure that if he just I like to challenge myself from time to time to step out and read something new. I have never read a medical fiction book before, which Didn’t Get Frazzled truly is. This story follows around Seth Levine as he navigates the world of being a medical student in New York City. This book is set in the early ninety’s and is written with the right proportions between all the medical jargon and Seth’s personal life. Seth is fresh into medical school with a skip in his step. He is so sure that if he just focuses on studying everything is going to work out as he planned. Then reality starts to sink in. Getting a medical degree is harder than he imagined. Not only does he need to hit the books but there are also the hands-on classes that he needs in order to learn anatomy or the correct way to do procedures. Oh my Lord, some of those scenes had my sides splitting. If I was not cracking up then I was a bit grossed out but never turned off. There is a great balance there that can appeal to all readers, even the ones with no medical background. Seth has a main squeeze in this book named April, they had met and dated in college and are trying to make a go of continuing their relationship while he is in med school. Did not like her character at all. She was just ridiculous, annoying, and written realistically. I could see this character being inspired by a real-life April. Whom I would not like in real life either. Even though Seth knows she is all wrong for him her familiarity in a new situation is comforting and he works really hard to make things work. I enjoyed watching this character develop. His journey was one of joy, heartache and realization. This was a fun read with plenty to offer. This is a nothing held back journey that is graphic, disgusting at times, and introspective as well. The writing touches you in a way that makes you feel like you know Seth or that he could be someone you have met. It also gives you some insight into how grueling becoming a M.D. can be. If I didn’t already know, this story would convince me that that path is not for me. If you are looking for a different type of read then I suggest you give this book a try. If nothing else it will have your side in stitches! This review is based on a complimentary book I received from Author, David Z Hirsch. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating. Find this review and more at The Genre Minx Book Reviews

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Enzenauer

    As a physician, I read most of the "fiction" by physicians about the journey through medical school, internship, and residency. And certainly this recent effort by Dr. David Hirsh (pseudonym) is a worthy addition to THE HOUSE OF GOD and MOUNT MISERY, written by an earlier generation physician, also under the pseudonym Samuel Shem. The story "rings true" to ANYONE who has made the similar trip trough medical school. As some other readers have commented, it is virtually IMPOSSIBLE to read this boo As a physician, I read most of the "fiction" by physicians about the journey through medical school, internship, and residency. And certainly this recent effort by Dr. David Hirsh (pseudonym) is a worthy addition to THE HOUSE OF GOD and MOUNT MISERY, written by an earlier generation physician, also under the pseudonym Samuel Shem. The story "rings true" to ANYONE who has made the similar trip trough medical school. As some other readers have commented, it is virtually IMPOSSIBLE to read this book without laughing out loud. The perhaps unique challenges of relationships during medical training will be recognized as authentic. This book can definitely help to provide some "insight" for nurses, LPNs, etc. who never spent time in the "hallowed" halls of medical academia. I definitely see a future TV series, "Didn't Get Frazzled", but perhaps with a better title. The main thing lacking in Hirsch's book are comparable "rules" of the House of God: Laws of the House of God: (Definition: GOMER - Get Out of My Emergency Room) 1.GOMERS don't die. 2.GOMERS go to ground 3.At a cardiac arrest, the first procedure is to take your own pulse. 4.The patient is the one with the disease. 5.Placement comes first. 6.There is no body cavity that cannot be reached with a #14G needle and a good strong arm. 7.Age + BUN = Lasix dose. 8.They can always hurt you more. 9.The only good admission is a dead admission. 10.If you don't take a temperature, you can't find a fever. 11.Show me a BMS (Best Medical Student, a student at The Best Medical School) who only triples my work and I will kiss his feet. 12.If the radiology resident and the medical student both see a lesion on the chest x-ray, there can be no lesion there. 13.The delivery of good medical care is to do as much nothing as possible. Strong work Dr. Hirsch. Can I assume that we will soon see Seth as an internal medicine intern and resident?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    The memorization, the hours, the social life, the fellow students, the obsessions with pseudo diagnosis, and all the bad jokes and pranks. Medical School whether in NYC or anywhere is a trial by fire survivable only with humor. As a retired RN it is almost a given that I would enjoy this light hearted fiction about the transformation this student goes through while suffering relationship angst. I loved it! I won the audiobook in a giveaway! David Gilmore is the voice actor who gave even more lif The memorization, the hours, the social life, the fellow students, the obsessions with pseudo diagnosis, and all the bad jokes and pranks. Medical School whether in NYC or anywhere is a trial by fire survivable only with humor. As a retired RN it is almost a given that I would enjoy this light hearted fiction about the transformation this student goes through while suffering relationship angst. I loved it! I won the audiobook in a giveaway! David Gilmore is the voice actor who gave even more life to the fun.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stevie Turner

    It's not very often I come across a humorous book where the author has just the same dry sense of humour as I have. I found this out to my delight by reading 'Didn't Get Frazzled' by David Z. Hirsch, MD. Mr Hirsch has written about what he knows, having qualified as a doctor many years ago. He writes from the heart in much gory detail about Seth Levine's years as a medical student, and interspersed with this is Seth's failing relationship with girlfriend April. The writing is intelligent and witt It's not very often I come across a humorous book where the author has just the same dry sense of humour as I have. I found this out to my delight by reading 'Didn't Get Frazzled' by David Z. Hirsch, MD. Mr Hirsch has written about what he knows, having qualified as a doctor many years ago. He writes from the heart in much gory detail about Seth Levine's years as a medical student, and interspersed with this is Seth's failing relationship with girlfriend April. The writing is intelligent and witty, and although some parts I would rather not have read (the gynaecological examination of an obese woman - ugh, and the autopsy of a baby), I did enjoy this book. I've known plenty of consultants who think they're God. These doctors have an inbuilt certainty that they're right and they look down on everybody else from a lofty height, especially the poor old medical student and the patient (I've seen medical students literally quaking on ward rounds after being grilled by a particularly obnoxious consultant). However, Seth has the ideal personality to succeed as a doctor - he refuses to get frazzled. It would be interesting to read a follow up to this book, to see how Seth fares as a qualified doctor. Recommended 5 star read for fans of witty medical 'faction'.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Too funny not to read! This book has been sitting unread in my Kindle app for some time...my bad! This is a great collection of incidents as experienced by a medical student and his fellow travelers over their four years of med school. It is humorous, sad, gory and a bunch of other adjectives that all add up to one fantastic read. Highly recommend.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Bloodworth

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I listened to this book but I LOVED it!!! I didn't want it to end...I laughed so hard and then there were spots that I wanted to cry...Seth (the main character) draws you in like you are there..I could picture the entire book while listening to it..I can't recommend this book enough!!!!!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Linda Zagon

    I would like to thank the author for a copy of "Didn't Get Frazzled" for my honest review. The genres of this book are Fiction, Contemporary Fiction, and Humor. In "Didn't Get Frazzled", David Z. Hirsch describes the quirky and zany characters in their first years of Medical School. Seth Levine, portrayed as insecure in his private relationships, but amazingly professional as a medical student, intern, then resident, narrates the story. He introduces us to his friends, colleagues, physicians and s I would like to thank the author for a copy of "Didn't Get Frazzled" for my honest review. The genres of this book are Fiction, Contemporary Fiction, and Humor. In "Didn't Get Frazzled", David Z. Hirsch describes the quirky and zany characters in their first years of Medical School. Seth Levine, portrayed as insecure in his private relationships, but amazingly professional as a medical student, intern, then resident, narrates the story. He introduces us to his friends, colleagues, physicians and supporting staff. Seen through Seth's eyes, some of the interns and physicians are indifferent, callous, rude, uncaring and unprofessional to the medical students as well as the patients. Seth seems to have a knack for providing compassion and understanding to patients,who are frightened and worried. He helps as best that he can answering their questions and listening to their concerns. His supervisors don't seem to get the whole picture, and as frustrating as that is David calmly does the best that he can and "doesn't get frazzled." As the medical students become aware of the various rotations in the hospital, they have to become adept at learning and doing. As interns, they have to become more adept at doing, and making decisions on their own. This might seem serious, but David Z Hirsch, describes the settings and the characters in a humorous way. I found myself laughing out loud at certain settings. David Z. Hirsch describes the medical relationships, and the patients who become well, and those that don't. There is the sadness and frustration and anger, when a patient dies. Of course a hospital is a setting of life and death. Seth also provides information on his single friends, and their relationships. There are times when it is important to have someone to talk too. How does one separate their private lives from their professional ones? This was an enjoyable read, and I would recommend it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eccentric Trilogy

    Didn’t get frazzled is a fictional medical-comedy told through the sarcastic narrative of Seth Levine; it pans over the years he is working hard to get his degree. With exams coming up and stress blooming like steam coming out of a kettle, I felt pretty fortunate to get such a fun book to read. Seth narrates the story in such a light-hearted manner that between cringing at his misfortunes in sympathy, you have to laugh. The plot itself is easy to follow, the reader checks in at him during severa Didn’t get frazzled is a fictional medical-comedy told through the sarcastic narrative of Seth Levine; it pans over the years he is working hard to get his degree. With exams coming up and stress blooming like steam coming out of a kettle, I felt pretty fortunate to get such a fun book to read. Seth narrates the story in such a light-hearted manner that between cringing at his misfortunes in sympathy, you have to laugh. The plot itself is easy to follow, the reader checks in at him during several parts of his life, gaining an insight as to how the American medical schooling system works but more importantly understanding how his relationships with friends and his girlfriend develop. There is some medical jargon, but it’s in no way confusing to the reader, simply adding a sense of realism. Seth’s interactions with the other characters mimicked those on comedy shows beautifully, making nearly every conversation an excellent read. The medical twist to it provides plenty of chances for these comedic moments, several gross stories being shared with the reader and the first chapter being literally called: A beautiful slice of dead penis (he performs a transection on this area of a cadaver). And yet the humour did not squash out the morality – you can’t help but love Seth, he stands up for what he believes in, even if it may lower his popularity from other doctors. He’s also a human. Lots of comedy authors forget that their characters have other emotions aside from happy and laughing at their life; Seth goes through a troubling time, battling with a bad-relationship that he struggles to maintain but also does not want to leave, on top of all his studying and witnessing some patients in severe pain. His empathetic attitude makes him thrive in his work, as does his ability to not get ‘frazzled’. Though if the book were to improve, I think it would have been insightful to see how he dealt with more pain through his profession, since those involved in medical careers will often cross paths with death usually by no fault of their own. The other characters accompany the story brilliantly, and the author managed to juggle between his different friends without any confusion. “I saw a mom last week who brought her daughter to the ER because she thought her kid had chicken pops.” Jeff cracked up, and I joined in. I always called Jeff when I needed to cheer up. “I knew she meant chicken pox, but each time she said chicken pops I thought, did Kellogg’s come out with a new chicken-flavored Pops cereal?” I finally found the skills gained from watching Casualty – do not eat or think about eating whilst the characters are inspecting a patient. Anyone squeamish will need to skim through these parts to avoid anything too unsettling. Personally, I was fine with it, to be honest if you are troubled by surgical shenanigans then perhaps not reading a book set around a medical student is better. In fact, the only parts I was less keen on were the more sexual, intimate scenes, which is purely my personal preference in books. Like the medical parts, this was not overly explicit, and these only popped up a few times, so did not make the read bad by any means. Targeted at an adult audience that appreciate comedy, I really enjoyed this one. Any students will find they can relate to the multitude of awkward situations and quantity of studying as well as the need for friends in such frantic time to retain ‘unfrazzled’; if you’re a medical student then this is a must-read. If you’ve read this or are considering doing so, please do leave me a comment!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hobart

    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- This book follows Seth Levine through his 4 years of medical school: from Gross Anatomy to the verge of residency. Not just about his training, but the toll it takes on his relationship, and the way it impacts the rest of his life (and the lives of his classmates). Overall, it's told with a light touch -- it's by no means a laugh out loud, slapstick-y comedy -- it's comedic. There's some drama, there's some tragedy, but overall, it's comed This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- This book follows Seth Levine through his 4 years of medical school: from Gross Anatomy to the verge of residency. Not just about his training, but the toll it takes on his relationship, and the way it impacts the rest of his life (and the lives of his classmates). Overall, it's told with a light touch -- it's by no means a laugh out loud, slapstick-y comedy -- it's comedic. There's some drama, there's some tragedy, but overall, it's comedic. The pacing could've been better -- the first two years take the first 16% of the book, making them pretty much just an extended prologue to the real action in the Third (56 percent of the book) and Fourth Year. The Third Year needs the bulk of the book given everything that goes on, but it just felt odd. I didn't need much more, just a little more from those first two years. The book didn't seem to know what it thought about Seth -- was he an everyman? was he a superstar? a sad-sack? Were we supposed to be rooting for him and his relationship? His medical career? If the book didn't seem to know what to think of him, how is the reader supposed to have an opinion? Eventually, the book decided (sometime after the 1/3 mark), but far later than I'd like. Misgivings and criticisms aside, this was an entertaining read -- it did everything it needed to: we got the gross med school moments, some medical triumphs, a failure, a couple of brushes with death, a couple of lessons about what a good doctor is, and a few chuckles. If med school/young doctor antics are your thing, or just 20-something bildungsromans, give this one a shot, your time will be well-spent. Disclaimer: I received this from the author in exchange for this post -- thanks to him for this, and I apologize for losing track of the emails regarding it so that I'm 8-9 months late with this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy Shannon

    The side to medical school you didn't know This was an entertaining and fun read, and I enjoyed the adventures and misadventures of the trek through medical school. The author probably derived this from his personal experiences and gave it an exciting but yet humorous story behind it. It seemed real but was so well written, it doesn't matter. The writer didn't bog the reader down with explanations of medical jargon, as it wasn't necessary to explain every little thing. He told a good story, and i The side to medical school you didn't know This was an entertaining and fun read, and I enjoyed the adventures and misadventures of the trek through medical school. The author probably derived this from his personal experiences and gave it an exciting but yet humorous story behind it. It seemed real but was so well written, it doesn't matter. The writer didn't bog the reader down with explanations of medical jargon, as it wasn't necessary to explain every little thing. He told a good story, and it was a great journey. Very charming.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    What a fun read! Seth shares his struggles of balancing the daily grind of medical school while attempting to have a personal life. And he shares these stories with humor and compassion. Through it all, he seems to keep his humility and remember that he is there for the patients. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I was provided a copy of this book from LibraryThing in exchange for my honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cyrene Olson

    Uncaged Book Reviews: There are many “truths” throughout the book. He truly didn’t get frazzled as he learned those truths. My favorite was his stint on the psych ward. I’ll leave it for you to read but, I will say he had the correct evaluation of our society today. Reviewed by Barbara 4 1/2 Stars Full review at UncagedBooks.com

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    My husband looked at me like I was insane while I read due to my fits of giggles. The book is well written with realistic characters and great dialogue. I highly recommend the audible version. The performance puts it over the top. He has perfect timing, inflection and he does sarcasm so well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Terri Wilson

    ** I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review** This was a fun book to read. I have to wonder if some of this is autobiographical or if the writer is sharing secrets from his fellow doctors. Even though this is a work of fiction, the author does a such a good job of making real characters and a believable plot, it feels like we are sharing stories to pass time while commuting on a train. I felt for Seth as he trudged through med school and his training while trying to balance his per ** I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review** This was a fun book to read. I have to wonder if some of this is autobiographical or if the writer is sharing secrets from his fellow doctors. Even though this is a work of fiction, the author does a such a good job of making real characters and a believable plot, it feels like we are sharing stories to pass time while commuting on a train. I felt for Seth as he trudged through med school and his training while trying to balance his personal life and his own sanity. I am a die-heart fantasy lover, but this was a great break from make believe while still providing a lot of entertainment and exercise for my imagination.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ann Welton

    First, thank you to LibraryThing for this e-book for my enjoyment and review. As a retired Nurse Practitioner I often choose novels with medical themes, and this one is now a favorite! I have read many books written about medical school, internships, residency - and this one stands out nicely. Easy story to follow, good character development, loved Hirsch's flow through his years of medical school and personal life. A must read for those interested in medical novels. Thanks, Dr. Hirsch.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    A Funny Tramp Down Memory Lane Didn't Get Frazzled chronicles the experiences of med student Seth Levine. Hirsch whisks readers back to the 90s and gives a fresh perspective on what it is actually like to be a medical student. Along the way, we are treated to the heartache, wonder, and laugh out loud experiences of what love and dating was like pre-Internet. Having been a medical student in the 90s myself, I was struck by how accurate and poignant Hirsch's depiction of medical student life was. No A Funny Tramp Down Memory Lane Didn't Get Frazzled chronicles the experiences of med student Seth Levine. Hirsch whisks readers back to the 90s and gives a fresh perspective on what it is actually like to be a medical student. Along the way, we are treated to the heartache, wonder, and laugh out loud experiences of what love and dating was like pre-Internet. Having been a medical student in the 90s myself, I was struck by how accurate and poignant Hirsch's depiction of medical student life was. Non-medical readers shouldn't fear reading this novel, however. Hirsch does not get overly technical about medical school, and he spends as much time on Seth's life outside of medical school as he does in it. As you can see by the author's bio, Hirsch's writing is funny and irreverent, but it is also gut wrenching and insightful. Be prepared for a roller coaster ride.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard van Balen

    This might be one of the best medical books I've ever read. Astonishing realism with a lot of recognizable moments. Thanks GoodReads friends for the tip!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    L. S.

    After watching Scrubs, I never thought I'd find medical media that even compared. Any time the practice gets involved, it's dark and angsty. Or nothing but unending drama. Scrubs was different in that, at its core, it remained lighthearted and goofy. Of course, there was drama and angst, but it wasn't the main theme of the show. Didn't Get Frazzled strikes me as very similar. Seth Levine takes us on his journey as a medical student. His story get split between the years, allowing the readers to n After watching Scrubs, I never thought I'd find medical media that even compared. Any time the practice gets involved, it's dark and angsty. Or nothing but unending drama. Scrubs was different in that, at its core, it remained lighthearted and goofy. Of course, there was drama and angst, but it wasn't the main theme of the show. Didn't Get Frazzled strikes me as very similar. Seth Levine takes us on his journey as a medical student. His story get split between the years, allowing the readers to navigate the passage of time with ease. To be honest, I took one look at the chapter titles and knew I was in for quite the story. I was not disappointed. Everything that Seth goes through as a student serves as another life lesson. Except he never lets it get him down. He has a dark sense of humor, much like his fellows, and it serves as a coping mechanism. Didn't Get Frazzled's told through first person and still maintains a voice that is all Seth. There's heavy medical jargon, as one would expect. However, the author knows his stuff (I would hope...MD's attached to the name). I never felt lost. Given the fact that Seth is a student, we learn things alongside him. With clever plot tricks and context clues, the author helps readers understand everything. For the most part, it doesn't assume anything. I felt comfortable reading it, regardless of my level of medical knowledge. Nor did I ever felt stupid for not knowing anything. Seth and the others routinely make mistakes. Flawed characters are prevalent throughout. All their flaws are story-related, and in line with their character development. Each character felt three-dimensional--the minor ones included. It feels like the same amount of thought and effort went into the background characters as the main. Description was wonderful. There was never that threshold of "too much" versus "too little." There wasn't information overload. By that, I mean wherein the author takes three pages to describe a characters' backstory. It creates pause in the narrative instead of allowing the reader to get to know the character in stages. There was also some obvious diversity in the cast. And they're never treated as negative stereotypes. Everyone has value. Didn't Get Frazzled has a lot to offer, including its own little positive message. Life's going to have curveballs. There's going to be ups and downs. Sometimes you have no control over a situation. The difference is what you do with it. An excellent read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roxie Prince

    Read this review and more on my blog at [Roxie Writes]. 'Didn't Get Frazzled' by David Z. Hirsch, MD. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5/5 Finished on September 20, 2017 GIVEN A FREE COPY IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW $3.99 on Kindle | $13.99 in Paperback BOOK DESCRIPTION: 'Didn't Get Frazzled' chronicles Seth Levine's life as a medical student. He meets several unique characters along the way including a fellow student who boasts he will eat any piece of a cadaver he cannot name, and a professor who performs a gynecolog Read this review and more on my blog at [Roxie Writes]. 'Didn't Get Frazzled' by David Z. Hirsch, MD. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5/5 Finished on September 20, 2017 GIVEN A FREE COPY IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW $3.99 on Kindle | $13.99 in Paperback BOOK DESCRIPTION: 'Didn't Get Frazzled' chronicles Seth Levine's life as a medical student. He meets several unique characters along the way including a fellow student who boasts he will eat any piece of a cadaver he cannot name, and a professor who performs a gynecological exam on herself. Over the four years it takes to become a doctor, Seth has to learn to juggle his personal relationships with his grueling schedule. It doesn't take long for Seth to realize how important it is for him not to get frazzled but also just how difficult of a task that is. 'Didn’t Get Frazzled' captures with distressing accuracy the gauntlet idealistic college grads must face to secure an MD and, against the odds, come out of it a better human being. MY REVIEW: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. 'Didn't Get Frazzled' is an entertaining and realistic portrayal of life as a medical student. I have never studied medicine, but I have a few friends who have, and through watching their experiences second-hand, this book rings close to their experiences. Seth and his friends go through several ups and downs over their four years and, as a reader, you go through them, too. Hirsch's writing is humorous and empathetic, and he creates characters we all know someone like, and who are just like us. Seth meets a lot of different characters along his journey through school, and a lot of them test his ability to keep his humanity. Becoming a doctor is an extremely difficult pursuit. A lot of folks disconnect to cope with the stress, but Seth discovers that in order for him to be a good doctor, he needs to hold onto his empathy and channel it. As someone who has spent her entire life under the care of countless doctors, I appreciated this. Those are the sorts of doctors I have been thankful for. Those are the kinds of doctors we need more of. I liked that this book didn't just focus on the medical studies aspects of Seth's life but also on his personal relationships because that's an extremely important part of a young adult's life, too, and going through such grueling schooling takes a toll. Hirsch tells a lovely story with an easy-to-read style, steady pacing, and well-written characters.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Coote

    Maybe the world is divided into two types of people: those who choose to do the stomach-churning things that doctors and nurses are obliged to do, and those who wonder why on earth people would choose to do the stomach-churning things that doctors and nurse are obliged to do. This delightful book helps explain why. Dress it up how you like, in the end it is the old clichés: ‘to help people’, ‘to make a difference’, ‘job satisfaction’. The author, thinly disguised as Seth Levine, sensitive medica Maybe the world is divided into two types of people: those who choose to do the stomach-churning things that doctors and nurses are obliged to do, and those who wonder why on earth people would choose to do the stomach-churning things that doctors and nurse are obliged to do. This delightful book helps explain why. Dress it up how you like, in the end it is the old clichés: ‘to help people’, ‘to make a difference’, ‘job satisfaction’. The author, thinly disguised as Seth Levine, sensitive medical student, narrates in a series of detailed, amusing and grisly anecdotes the dedication, stress and privation required during student years to eventually become a successful medical practitioner. Much of the medical narrative is extremely gory and some quite upsetting. But does this make good entertainment? Well yes, if it is related with empathy and put into context which it is here. The hours that the young medics work play such havoc with their own personal lives, and sometimes their health, that you cannot help but sympathise with their own privations and frequent resorts to gallows humour. Didn’t Get Dazzled tries, largely successfully, to show how young medical students juggle the stress of endless study, long hours and constant pressure with desperate attempts to forge longer-term relationships outside of work. Not surprisingly, Seth and his girlfriend April struggle, and his colleagues and fellow students all struggle, with trying to create solid and meaningful, romantic lives in a ‘surreal alternative universe that no outsider could truly fathom’. As well-written and thoroughly enjoyable as the book is, it comes across as the fleshing out of private journals written during college years with the names of real characters changed to save embarrassment (or litigation). It is as if the author wished to include all the experiences and in-jokes of those years in novel form before his memories blurred into little, half-forgotten fragments (only a follow up work will show otherwise.) The result is this: a work overly physically descriptive but looser on the more penetrative psychological side because of it – but only just. First rate, nevertheless. Just a quibble on the formatting in order to make a more comfortable read: The line spacing needs to be closer (unmanageable on my Kindle, at least), and the first line of new paragraphs, especially where there is speech, needs indenting on the left.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kit Crumpton

    The phases of medical school. Using mnemonics in creative/funny ways to remember words and series. This took me down memory lane when I had to memorize the molecular chain in photosynthesis for my Biology class as an undergrad. Young love in flux and all the residual consequences. (Memory lane again). The author has a wonderful way of mixing poignancy and humor with the craziness of youth wanting to make new relationship rules and then wondering why they don’t work out in the long run. “We’re ju The phases of medical school. Using mnemonics in creative/funny ways to remember words and series. This took me down memory lane when I had to memorize the molecular chain in photosynthesis for my Biology class as an undergrad. Young love in flux and all the residual consequences. (Memory lane again). The author has a wonderful way of mixing poignancy and humor with the craziness of youth wanting to make new relationship rules and then wondering why they don’t work out in the long run. “We’re just friends!” …UH-HUH… The main character’s love for April and the pain of his loss when the relationship did not work out was well written. It tugs at the heart strings. Golly, I’m glad I’m not in that roller-coaster phase of my life. BUT there are more important things to be learned in medical school – demanding, rigorous, hard work and no sleep. I wondered when Seth had time to do laundry or buy toilet paper. Golly, this is fun read – frankly because it’s his (Seth’s life) – not mine. I understand the good sex (again well written), laughter amongst friends, observing symptoms, diagnosis and spontaneous interrogation by physicians who are mentoring Seth and his colleagues along the way. He mentions the book, “The New Our Bodies Ourselves”. I have that book! It was significant to me too – oh so many years ago. Is it really possible that an instructor would also be the model in a gynecologic exam? I loved the metaphor …” flicking [the drape] … like a preening matador”. The description is priceless. Obstetrics and Pediatrics: Teenage mothers – a physician’s view of children having children. Stepping through reflex tests of babies. Charming. I actually learned something. And a tired, frustrated mother who waited long hours to see a pediatrician. Seth gives the woman compassion and the reader is convinced Seth will become a successful physician. The pace is wonderful. There were times I had that fabulous, guttural laugh, with tears running down my face and I had to put the book down just to relish the moment. This is an excellent read – and required-reading material for anyone thinking about going to medical school. You have to be smart, be able to roll with the dice, analytical, exercise empathy, work very, very hard and have a sense of humor. Wild applause!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen Terrell

    Seth Levine is the MD I want for my family: Smart, compassionate, dedicated, a good listener, and - most importantly, from my perspective - with a sense of humor that doesn't quit. I was raised in Christian Science - still identify as a Christian Scientist - and, except for the times when I took my sons to the doctor as they were growing up, never spent much time around hospitals or doctors' offices until recently. In the last couple years I have become more familiar with the local medical commun Seth Levine is the MD I want for my family: Smart, compassionate, dedicated, a good listener, and - most importantly, from my perspective - with a sense of humor that doesn't quit. I was raised in Christian Science - still identify as a Christian Scientist - and, except for the times when I took my sons to the doctor as they were growing up, never spent much time around hospitals or doctors' offices until recently. In the last couple years I have become more familiar with the local medical community since my parents' move to be near me. After frequent visits to the doctor and the ER, my mom died in hospice in my home last winter, and my dad (99) is dealing with some medical challenges that come with living a very long life. I have met some really wonderful people in the medical field. I have also met some folks in the medical field whom I hope to never meet again. Hirsch's book has helped humanize doctors for me - has helped me see real men and women behind the lab coats, and not just cardboard cut-outs of "A Doctor." I think this is really important. We don't want doctors to dehumanize their patients. I guess we shouldn't dehumanize doctors, either. Although there are a handful of places where I found some grammatical errors, *Didn't Get Frazzled* is well-written. The pacing is perfect - I like the way the book is divided into small chapters - each chapter a short story in itself. There's wonderful humor woven throughout (as I mentioned earlier, humor is really important to me). And *Didn't Get Frazzled* has something to say to all of us. As one of the characters in the book says: "“Listen. Forget about rounds, forget about everything except this: the patient comes first. You do what you need to do, even if it turns out you’d been wrong, or you’d overreacted, or you’d pissed somebody off to get it done -- it doesn’t matter." Depending on your job, replace the word "patient" with "student" or "customer" or "client" and I'm thinking there's a message in there for all of us. Karen Molenaar Terrell, author of *Blessings: Adventures of a Madcap Christian Scientist*

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