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La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y de su abuela desalmada

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La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y su abuela desalmada es una novela corta o cuento largo escrito por Gabriel García Márquez en 1972 y publicado por primera vez en 1978 . Es una obra en la que se trata ampliamente el tema de la prostitución de menores en el Caribe Sudamericano. Narra la historia extendida de Eréndira, una joven criada por su abuela desd La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y su abuela desalmada es una novela corta o cuento largo escrito por Gabriel García Márquez en 1972 y publicado por primera vez en 1978 . Es una obra en la que se trata ampliamente el tema de la prostitución de menores en el Caribe Sudamericano. Narra la historia extendida de Eréndira, una joven criada por su abuela desde que murió su padre. Al llegar a la preadolesencia, la prostituye para así mantener su nivel de vida. También se puede interpretar como una metáfora de García Márquez entre la explotación de los países menos desarrollados (Eréndira) por parte de países desarrollados (La abuela). Comienza así su peregrinaje. En uno de tantos pueblos, Eréndira conoce a Ulises, quien se enamora de ella. La busca, le dice que en la noche volverá por ella y la llamará usando el canto de una lechuza. Los dos huyen pero la abuela consigue que la autoridad militar los persiga y atrape. Para que eso no se repita, desde entonces la abuela mantiene encadenada a la cama a Eréndira.


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La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y su abuela desalmada es una novela corta o cuento largo escrito por Gabriel García Márquez en 1972 y publicado por primera vez en 1978 . Es una obra en la que se trata ampliamente el tema de la prostitución de menores en el Caribe Sudamericano. Narra la historia extendida de Eréndira, una joven criada por su abuela desd La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y su abuela desalmada es una novela corta o cuento largo escrito por Gabriel García Márquez en 1972 y publicado por primera vez en 1978 . Es una obra en la que se trata ampliamente el tema de la prostitución de menores en el Caribe Sudamericano. Narra la historia extendida de Eréndira, una joven criada por su abuela desde que murió su padre. Al llegar a la preadolesencia, la prostituye para así mantener su nivel de vida. También se puede interpretar como una metáfora de García Márquez entre la explotación de los países menos desarrollados (Eréndira) por parte de países desarrollados (La abuela). Comienza así su peregrinaje. En uno de tantos pueblos, Eréndira conoce a Ulises, quien se enamora de ella. La busca, le dice que en la noche volverá por ella y la llamará usando el canto de una lechuza. Los dos huyen pero la abuela consigue que la autoridad militar los persiga y atrape. Para que eso no se repita, desde entonces la abuela mantiene encadenada a la cama a Eréndira.

30 review for La increíble y triste historia de la cándida Eréndira y de su abuela desalmada

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    If you want adult fairy tales & lore, then this one's for you. Garcia Marquez has his own genre to contend with and it's works such as these that make him a recognizable figure in your literary consciousness. His short stories are fables and allegories... they contend with time and death and love... the images are pulled out of dreams and Latin American culture (& what wasn't there before is invented NOW) all with wicked mastery... all the while a dreamscape becomes well established in the reade If you want adult fairy tales & lore, then this one's for you. Garcia Marquez has his own genre to contend with and it's works such as these that make him a recognizable figure in your literary consciousness. His short stories are fables and allegories... they contend with time and death and love... the images are pulled out of dreams and Latin American culture (& what wasn't there before is invented NOW) all with wicked mastery... all the while a dreamscape becomes well established in the reader's inspired noggin. This is like reading artwork.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    This collection of earlier work features stories abound with love affairs, ruined beauty, magical women, and perspectives on death. Are all similar in style but only about half are really good, with Innocent Erendira the one stand out . You feel like most of these are rough idea's that would later show up in his full on novels and novellas. You also know right from the off this is Marquez, that is of course, if you have already read him. For anyone that hasn't, this isn't a bad place to start be This collection of earlier work features stories abound with love affairs, ruined beauty, magical women, and perspectives on death. Are all similar in style but only about half are really good, with Innocent Erendira the one stand out . You feel like most of these are rough idea's that would later show up in his full on novels and novellas. You also know right from the off this is Marquez, that is of course, if you have already read him. For anyone that hasn't, this isn't a bad place to start before venturing off into his more recognizable work. I have always been enthralled with his style, not so much with some of his themes. He drags his heels through the dust at times with whimsical insights into the human condition, whilst playing around with your thoughts. This book is an odd assortment that the publisher mushed together. "Night of the Curlews" is one that should have been dropped, I skipped most of it. Also "Eyes of the Blue Dog", was pretty weak. Apart from that all stories are either three or four star standard. His trademark 'magical realism' undergoes an acid trio in places, worthy or unworthy depending how you see it, similar to a William Burroughs or Hunter. S. Thompson, which is hit and miss, whilst death is something that plays heavy on most of the stories, he seems morbidly conscious of the deteriorating human body for some strange reason. Other things that show up, a doppelganger, surrealistic painters, and a bartender who falls for a whore. But it's the title novella that showcases his genius, about a ruthless grandmother pimping her granddaughter to obtain reparations for the house that was burned down due to the carelessness of the granddaughter. There is sexual titillation and underlying themes of religion here, done in way much more richly textured and refined that the rest of the pack. There are flourishes of things still to come in these offerings, but by and large the early Márquez had greater words and ideas still inside waiting to come out. By the time he writes 'Innocent Eréndira' we see a shift in capability start to unfold, and there is greater engagement and understanding in his writing. He skilfully reveals the story and the characters, so much so that we forget 'Innocent Eréndira' is actually a darker story, encompassing some sordid form of child abuse. As a whole this collection is down the pecking order compared to his most famous work, showing flashes here and there of what was to follow in later years, laying a marker down and confounding a Kafkaesque introspection perhaps best documented as experiments along the way. I probably would have scored this a three overall had it not been for the title story. Put simply, this is a writer in the process of honing his skills.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elsa Rajan Pradhananga

    This was a strange assortment of surrealistic stories that tug at your heart and leave you contemplating long after you’ve left the pages. Most of the stories are set in a blur between the real and unreal and without a reread, the subtle emotions evoked by most of these stories just kept ringing in the mind like the distant echo of a much loved song. My favorite was Eyes of a Blue Dog that felt like stepping into a parallel universe where our dreams synced perfectly with others’. In it, a woman This was a strange assortment of surrealistic stories that tug at your heart and leave you contemplating long after you’ve left the pages. Most of the stories are set in a blur between the real and unreal and without a reread, the subtle emotions evoked by most of these stories just kept ringing in the mind like the distant echo of a much loved song. My favorite was Eyes of a Blue Dog that felt like stepping into a parallel universe where our dreams synced perfectly with others’. In it, a woman chases a dream she longs to live, but believes that she is let down by her lover’s inability to recall dreams upon waking up, rather than the fact that it is just a dreamscape she is pursuing. And The Woman Who Came at Six O’ Clock is a perfect take on the manipulative power of love wherein a fat, puffy faced restaurant owner mellows out to the whore he loves and agrees to do what he wasn’t aware he was capable of. I didn’t think much of the titular story Innocent Erendira… and I attribute it to the author’s neutral approach to child abuse as if it was a norm. The story of the domestic and sexual exploitation of the 14 year old Erendira who is conditioned to obedience to her bitch of a grandmother felt like was a mad rush of words or rather an outline of a novel, which probably was why the author doesn't get explicit, idealize the prostitution or condemn it. One thing leads to another and readers are left without the space to empathize with the victim or even feel an aversion for where the story is going. I enjoyed reading The Third Resignation that described the much shared fear of death, burial and solitude that follows and Someone Has Been Disarranging These Roses - one that traced observations, memories and needs from the other side of death. In all, I felt that Innocent Erendira and Other Stories is a mixed bag of timeless stories with magic woven into poetic text.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hend

    the theme common in most of these short stories is death ..... besides the story of Innocent Erendira ,these four stories was interesting to me... The third resignation. i think this one is extraordinary,describes the fear of death,burial,solid ate and abandonment ....he has gone furthest in dramatizing the terror of burial..... The woman who came at six o'clock it portrays the conflict between good and evil,the innocence of Jose a restaurant owner,and Reina a prostitute who used to come at the resta the theme common in most of these short stories is death ..... besides the story of Innocent Erendira ,these four stories was interesting to me... The third resignation. i think this one is extraordinary,describes the fear of death,burial,solid ate and abandonment ....he has gone furthest in dramatizing the terror of burial..... The woman who came at six o'clock it portrays the conflict between good and evil,the innocence of Jose a restaurant owner,and Reina a prostitute who used to come at the restaurant at 6 o'clock,she murdered one of her clients,and wanted Jose to cover it,and lie about the time she arrived ,and say it was five_ thirty,the naive Jose agree to her request,after she succeeded in extracting from him a declaration of her love, and his promise to defend her,at the end Riena decided to make a big transformation in her life and leave prostitution,and seek a better life were she cant be victim any more....... Death constant beyond love about obsessiveness, political corruption and love that has no chance .... Eyes of a blue dog describes the feeling of loneliness and fear...... the two lovers in this story,a man who suffers instant amnesia upon awakening,and a woman who is madly chasing this man whom she meets in the dream.... she wanders through the city muttering, eyes of a blue dog. marking her passage, hoping that one day that man will see her marks and remember her.......

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lavinia

    Oh, the first story - A very old man with enormous wings - is absolutely fantastic, and it reminded me of this wonderful painting by Romanian artist Stefan Caltia: *** I haven't always liked reading short stories. But I realise now what amount of work it takes to tell a story in only a few pages, to concentrate all the ideas you would put in tens or hundreds of pages (supposed you were to write a novel) in just a few paragraphs. And sometimes, I guess, writing stories gives you the freedom of expl Oh, the first story - A very old man with enormous wings - is absolutely fantastic, and it reminded me of this wonderful painting by Romanian artist Stefan Caltia: *** I haven't always liked reading short stories. But I realise now what amount of work it takes to tell a story in only a few pages, to concentrate all the ideas you would put in tens or hundreds of pages (supposed you were to write a novel) in just a few paragraphs. And sometimes, I guess, writing stories gives you the freedom of exploring new techniques - as in one of these stories, where the first full stop is actually at the very end and I had to read it in full speed, holding my breath. I finally made up my mind. Marquez kicks Pamuk's ass.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frankie

    This is a good start for ggb readers. The title story, at 60 pages practically a novella, is beautiful. "Innocent Eréndira..." has moments of colorful magical realism, particularly during the grandmother character's bouts of sleep-talking. There is a series of vaguely-connected shorts on the blur between sleep and death in the middle of the collection. These I didn't enjoy. The stream-of-consciousness technique and inner-dialogue made them difficult to follow. Two stories – "The Sea of Lost Time" This is a good start for ggb readers. The title story, at 60 pages practically a novella, is beautiful. "Innocent Eréndira..." has moments of colorful magical realism, particularly during the grandmother character's bouts of sleep-talking. There is a series of vaguely-connected shorts on the blur between sleep and death in the middle of the collection. These I didn't enjoy. The stream-of-consciousness technique and inner-dialogue made them difficult to follow. Two stories – "The Sea of Lost Time" and "Eyes of a Blue Dog" – were amazing. Especially "Eyes of a Blue Dog" – read it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Zapata

    This amazing book brings together the short novel that gives the book his name,and six more fantastic short stories. Each of them a masterpiece on their own,all of them world famous. It's hard for me to pick a favorite from this collection,or from any other by Garcia Marquez,he's just such a good and powerful writer,a magician. I really enjoy and love the ending for the story "Blacaman el bueno,vendedor de milagros",I thought I was reading something from "The Arabian Nights". And that's the feel This amazing book brings together the short novel that gives the book his name,and six more fantastic short stories. Each of them a masterpiece on their own,all of them world famous. It's hard for me to pick a favorite from this collection,or from any other by Garcia Marquez,he's just such a good and powerful writer,a magician. I really enjoy and love the ending for the story "Blacaman el bueno,vendedor de milagros",I thought I was reading something from "The Arabian Nights". And that's the feeling you get after reading it,the magical realism,the miracles,the legends that come alive each time Marquez takes a pen.Even the titles are awesome: "Un senor muy viejo con unas alas enormes", "El ahogado mas hermoso del mundo", "Muerte constante mas alla del amor","El mar del tiempo perdido", "El ultimo viaje del buque fantasma". A classic of world literature!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    For me, not one of the high points in Marquez work, the poor Erendira attempts to escape her fate as a prostitute in choosing a hapless guy who reminded me a little of Fabrice from Stendhal's Chartreuse de Parme to help her. The other stories are ok as well. Yes, the writing is great, but the "sold into prostitution and wants out" trope feels a bit worn to me at least in this tale.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This was a collection of one GGM novella ("Erendira") and a couple of other short stories, some of which I'd definitely read before ("A Very Old Man W/ Enormous Wings"), some of which I think I've maybe read before ("El ahogado mas hermoso del mundo"), and a few others I don't think I've ever heard of. Whoever was in charge of editing/publishing this edition did an amazing job of picking/sequencing the stories. It almost read like a linked short story collection, even though I don't think GGM eve This was a collection of one GGM novella ("Erendira") and a couple of other short stories, some of which I'd definitely read before ("A Very Old Man W/ Enormous Wings"), some of which I think I've maybe read before ("El ahogado mas hermoso del mundo"), and a few others I don't think I've ever heard of. Whoever was in charge of editing/publishing this edition did an amazing job of picking/sequencing the stories. It almost read like a linked short story collection, even though I don't think GGM ever deliberately published this particular set of stories as a collection. There's lots of sea/desert/Caribbean/magical realism vibes in these stories, and it's all very enjoyable: -"Un senor muy viejo con unas alas enormes": What else can we say about this one, a classic. - "El ahogado mas hermoso del mundo": The part when the town ladies are all, "he looks like an Esteban..." ha! Ha! I find GGM so funny at times... I feel like it is hard to translate his humor into English...? -"El mar del tiempo perdido": This one def felt like it was from the "early GGM experimentation with magical realism" era. Still, the image of a "sea that smells of roses" is one for the ages... - "El ultimo viaje del buque fantasma": Def the most challenging one to read and a precursor to the endless run-on sentence of "Autumn of the Patriarch". - "Muerte constante mas alla del amor": Always fun to read the GGM material that is about politics en el Caribe. - "Blacaman el bueno, vendedor de milagros": This one was definitely from the "GGM leans hard on magical realism" era. Nicely sadistic twist ending. - "La increible y triste historia de la candida Erendira y de su abuela desalmada": I thought this story was hysterical—the bitchy grandmother, what a character! The climax—when the grandmother gets stabbed and starts spurting green blood, "like mint filling"—is so epic. Bonus points for being short.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Licha

    Not rating this book as a whole since I was unable to finish this. Just wasn't the right time for me to read this and I hope to get back to some of the stories I did not read at some point. Read this book in Spanish. Un Senor muy Viejo con unas alas enormes (1968)--4 stars The imagery in this story was just beautiful. An old man with wings comes in from the sea. The people of this small seaside town are affected by this event. GGM can totally suck you into his world and make you believe that this i Not rating this book as a whole since I was unable to finish this. Just wasn't the right time for me to read this and I hope to get back to some of the stories I did not read at some point. Read this book in Spanish. Un Senor muy Viejo con unas alas enormes (1968)--4 stars The imagery in this story was just beautiful. An old man with wings comes in from the sea. The people of this small seaside town are affected by this event. GGM can totally suck you into his world and make you believe that this is all real. El mar del tiempo perdido (1961)--3 stars The smell of roses emanating from the sea brings with it the dread of death. Don't know what to make of these stories sometimes, but once again, the imagery is fantastic. El ahogado mas hermoso del mundo (1968)--3 stars A giant, beautiful man floats in from the sea. The whole town prepares him for his funeral out at sea. Imagery comes through once again. Muerte constante mas alla del amor (1970)--no rating Did not read, but what a beautiful line for a start: Al Senador Oneismo Sanchez le faltaban seis meses y once dias para morirse cuando encontro a la mujer de su vida. Translation: Senator Oneismo Sanchez had 6 months and 11 days left to live when he found the woman of his life. By this point, I just couldn't read more of these stories, as captivating as the first line of this story is. El ultimo viaje del buque fantasma (1968)--no rating. Did not read. Blacaman el bueno, vendedor de milagros (1968)--no rating. Did not read. La increible y triste historia de la candida Erendira y de su abuela desalmada (1972) That title still wows me (The incredible and sad story of the candid Erendira and her soulless grandmother). The story sadly did not wow me. It actually made me feel icky as I read it and had to finally call it quits halfway through the story. It made me not want to finish the rest of the stories (I read them out of order, being excited to read this one before the others.) This deals with child abuse and child prostitution. The subject is never easy, but the imagery in this one was just too hard to take and made me want to cringe. Very dark and depressing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    toni

    The Incredible and Sad Tale of Innocent Eréndira and Her Heartless Grandmother: Yeah, I’ve seen longer ones but actually not as many as you might think. The real problem is, when a title gets really long, it gradually grows into a living thing, has its own life, and sometimes breathes really loud. But dignified (and windy) as they are, long titles rarely lapse into absurdity and surely don’t bite, plus one thing’s for sure, wherever they go, they always carry with them this unmistakable aura of The Incredible and Sad Tale of Innocent Eréndira and Her Heartless Grandmother: Yeah, I’ve seen longer ones but actually not as many as you might think. The real problem is, when a title gets really long, it gradually grows into a living thing, has its own life, and sometimes breathes really loud. But dignified (and windy) as they are, long titles rarely lapse into absurdity and surely don’t bite, plus one thing’s for sure, wherever they go, they always carry with them this unmistakable aura of nostalgia, like a melancholy sweet haze, which constantly reminds you of ‘Golden Lotus’, or more accurately, the ten feet long cotton bandage that never fails to perform the miracle. By the way, just because the it's neither cheerful or believable doesn’t mean the opposite is true. To conclude, Eréndira is not as great as the rumor has it (now, kids, go back to your room and do your homework). And for the record, the 'Other Stories' part is left untouched (will read them later in the Collected Stories), so the stars (or maybe I should take the ‘s’ off and just give it o..n...) are for Eréndira and Eréndira only.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Biogeek

    Never an easy read, but each of these stories can be understood if read after reading GGM's own words about writing where he says about this collection that "I found the embryo of Autumn, a Russian salad of experiments copied from other bad or good writers of the last century.Phrases that would have required dozens of pages are resolved in two or three." (referring of course to his later Autumn of the Patriarch". The very disturbing and difficult first story deals with conflicts between the older Never an easy read, but each of these stories can be understood if read after reading GGM's own words about writing where he says about this collection that "I found the embryo of Autumn, a Russian salad of experiments copied from other bad or good writers of the last century.Phrases that would have required dozens of pages are resolved in two or three." (referring of course to his later Autumn of the Patriarch". The very disturbing and difficult first story deals with conflicts between the older and the younger generation, but possibly even more about the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized. I think this could be especially true of Latin American, where Spain, the parent country (or the grandparent in the story), had through an accident of history, managed to become an exploiter who was unable to even walk without the help of the exploited. Or it may be about the role of dictators and the countries they pillage. In this case the "putting the granddaughter up for prostitution" may symbolize how despotic rulers allowed the lands to be exploited by foreign companies like the United Fruit Company.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mounir

    I was lucky to find this book at a second-hand street stall. This is my second Marquez book after "No one writes to the colonel", and it gave me a real shock. I was not aware that Marquez wrote in such a bizarre style. About three of the twelve stories - including the novella "Innocent Erendira" - are written in a style that may be described as "classical", although Innocent Eréndira stands alone as a category by itself: drastic and violent actions described in a neutral way, and the amout of ph I was lucky to find this book at a second-hand street stall. This is my second Marquez book after "No one writes to the colonel", and it gave me a real shock. I was not aware that Marquez wrote in such a bizarre style. About three of the twelve stories - including the novella "Innocent Erendira" - are written in a style that may be described as "classical", although Innocent Eréndira stands alone as a category by itself: drastic and violent actions described in a neutral way, and the amout of phantasy and myth in this novella is superb. The symbolism in this novella and the direct events in the other stories also refer in a harsh and sarcastic way to political oppression and corruption. The remaining stories describe a surrealist world where the boundaries of life and death, the self and others, the living and the non-living are totally blurred. In many instances, one is not sure whether the narrator is alive or dead or whether he/she is going through the shadowy passage between life and death. The recurrent themes in these stories include a body ready for burial or already buried; a dead brother; "smells"; what can be called "a loss of ego boundaries"; thoughts about the human body and its physical mechanisms; thoughts about the descent of a person from remote ancestors, etc. To me some of those stories were very difficult to "understand", i.e. if understanding was the aim of these stories. So, it is better to just go with the narrative and let oneself be influenced by the subtle feelings and emotions that are transmitted through the words, actions, memories and perceptions of the persons in these stories. One needs to re-read many of these stories. This is the type of work that does not render itself to understanding from the first read. A difficult but challenging and amazing book

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daren

    A collection of short stories from GGM. The title story, and by far the longest, is an excellent tale of the winds of misfortune, and Eréndira's resulting cruel and fascinating repayment of her perceived debt. For me this was the most enjoyable of the stories. The other eleven stories deal, in typical GGM fashion, with death, alternative death, magical realism. For me they were a bit hit and miss. These stories all state the date they were written, and flicking through them they range mostly in t A collection of short stories from GGM. The title story, and by far the longest, is an excellent tale of the winds of misfortune, and Eréndira's resulting cruel and fascinating repayment of her perceived debt. For me this was the most enjoyable of the stories. The other eleven stories deal, in typical GGM fashion, with death, alternative death, magical realism. For me they were a bit hit and miss. These stories all state the date they were written, and flicking through them they range mostly in the 1947-53 range, with the title story in 1972, one in 1962 and one in 1970. That would put this as some of his earlier work, so perhaps that is why for me, it doesn't contain the polish of some of his other works. Solid 3 stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sneh Pradhan

    Delightful , Sensual , Magic Realism ( my favourite genre ) and Gabriel Garcia Marquez ... what's not to enjoy !!! All the stories are just the stuff a fan of this genre would love to fill languid , hopefully rain-imbued afternoons with ! Especially , the titular story , that of Innocent Erendira takes you on quite a bittersweet odyssey !

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Hale

    Another collection of short stories, and Marquez excels in the format. In this book, the first short story - the one about Erendira of the title - is about half the book, and the other eleven stories are much shorter. The majority of the stories are about death, actually, whether it's encroaching death or what happens afterward. In one story, a twin wonders what will become of him when his brother dies; will his brother be resurrected by his life force, or will his brother's death rot into his b Another collection of short stories, and Marquez excels in the format. In this book, the first short story - the one about Erendira of the title - is about half the book, and the other eleven stories are much shorter. The majority of the stories are about death, actually, whether it's encroaching death or what happens afterward. In one story, a twin wonders what will become of him when his brother dies; will his brother be resurrected by his life force, or will his brother's death rot into his bones before he dies? In a different story, the narrator is the ghost inhabiting the house he lived in before dying, and is always rearranging the roses of his childhood friend who lives there now. One story is about a politician's unexpected passionate affair that begins after he learns he is dying, and ends with his bitter death. One of the more surreal stories is about a girl, Eva, who has vacated her body. She doesn't seem to have died, but just moved on to a higher spiritual plane that transcends corporeal forms; she considers reincarnating herself in her cat, just so she can have a taste of an orange. I am accustomed to Marquez's use of magical realism - actually, I love it - but these stories focus on the aspect of twinning, mirrors, and death, to the exclusion of some of the more earthy supernatural phenomenon I associate with his work. I remember studying in school the idea of the mythopoetic, an inward world that is transcendent and primitive. Authors create such an atmosphere through the use of mirrors and twins, among other things, and that feeling is very strong in much of this book. Also, a lot of the stories are more abstract, dealing as they do with existences after death or outside of life. I enjoyed them for their novelty, because I don't read short stories like that much; however, I must say, my favorite stories were the ones that I am more accustomed to, the ones that feel like magical realism to me. I loved the one called where the smell of roses came from the sea, and the men dive in and swim past all the happily swimming dead to find turtles at the bottom of the ocean. I also liked the story about two people meeting in dreams, who are in love, but can never find each other, because the man never remembers his dreams. The main story, Erendira, is also more similar to some of Marquez's novels in style and theme. If it weren't for the subject matter, I would have liked that one a lot as well. The innocent girl, Erendira, is a teenager when the winds of misfortune change her life. She is illegitimate, and lives with her grandmother; her father is dead and her mother is gone. One night, Erendira leaves a candle burning on her nightstand by mistake, and while she is sleeping, ferocious winds invade the house and knock the flame down. The ensuing conflagration destroys almost everything. Her grandmother has made a life out of her memories, so when she sees the mementos of her past dwindled into ashes, she decides that the only thing to do is to force Erendira to buy back everything. She sells her granddaughter's body to anyone who can pay, and is clean (she wouldn't want to damage her property). Over time, the grandmother's calculations of how much Erendira owes her for destroying their home grow more and more obtuse, as she adds in payments for the musicians and the traveling fees, and any other expense at all. It becomes apparent that Erendira will never clear her debt to her grandmother. Fortunately, she meets young Ulises who falls deeply in love with her. Deep enough to kill for her. He makes several failed attempts on the enormous grandmother, until, spurred by Erendira's scorn, he resorts to a brutal stabbing attack. As the grandmother dies and falls on Ulises, Erendira takes the vest stitched with gold bars, and flies into the wind, running, running, never to be seen again. The writing in this story is strong, the characters are fascinating and compelling, and the style is full of literary beauty and surprise. However, I simply don't like a story where a young girl is prostituted out by her own grandmother. Horrible. As a mother, my aversion is even stronger. So while the story may be good, it doesn't appeal to me; as my husband remarked upon seeing the synopsis on the cover, that Marquez is kind of a pervert. I don't agree with him, but I share his disgust at this story. Altogether, I enjoyed about half the book (the stories not about Erendira), and felt that the entire book was well written with that mystical feel I so enjoyed from South American writers. The stories about death were bizarre and intriguing, and a few of the short stories I absolutely loved. The book balances out for me, then, into a good read but not one of my favorites.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jigar Brahmbhatt

    "Sea of Lost Time" is the best of the lot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    A. Gulden

    Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - Eva is Inside Her Cat "The walls gave off a strong smell of fresh paint, that thick, grand smell that you don't smell with your nose but with your stomach." Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - The Woman Who Came at Six O'Clock "An idea that had entered through one ear, spun about for a moment, vague, confused, and gone out through the other, leaving behind only a warm vestige of terror." Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - The Other Side of Death Yes. T Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - Eva is Inside Her Cat "The walls gave off a strong smell of fresh paint, that thick, grand smell that you don't smell with your nose but with your stomach." Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - The Woman Who Came at Six O'Clock "An idea that had entered through one ear, spun about for a moment, vague, confused, and gone out through the other, leaving behind only a warm vestige of terror." Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - The Other Side of Death Yes. They were twin brothers, exact, whom no one could distinguish at first sight. Before when they both were living their separate lives, they were nothing but two twin brothers, simple and apart like two different men. Spiritually there was no common factor between them. But now, when rigidity, the terrible reality, was climbing up along his back like an invertebrate animal, something had dissolved in his integral atmosphere, something that sounded like an emptiness, as if a precipice had opened up at his side, or as if his body had suddenly been sliced in two by an axe; not that exact, anatomical body under a perfect geometrical definition; not that physical body that now felt fear; another body, rather, that was coming from beyond his, that had been sunken with him in the liquid night of the maternal womb and was climbing up with him through the branches of an ancient genealogy; that was with him in the blood of his four pairs of great-grandparents and that came from way back, from the beginning of the world, sustaining with its weight, with its mysterious presence, the whole universal balance. It might be that he had been in the blood of Isaac and Rebecca, that it was his other brother who had been born shackled to his heel and who came tumbling along generation after generation, night after night, from kiss to kiss, from love to love, descending through arteries and testicles until he arrived, as on a night voyage at the womb of his recent mother.   Innocent Erendira and Other Stories - The Sea of Lost Time "My last wish," she said to her husband, "is to be buried alive." She said it as if she were on her deathbed, but she was sitting across the table in a dining room with windows through which the bright March light came pouring in and spread throughout the house. Opposite her, calming his peaceful hunger, was old Jacob, a man who had loved her so much and for so long that he could no longer conceive of any suffering that didn't start with his life. "Erendira was bathing her grandmother when the wind of her misfortune began to blow."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Lopez

    The author purpose of writing ‘’Innocent Erendira’’ is to show the way a twelve year old named Erendira lives with her grandmother and what she goes through. Another reason why the author purpose of writing this story is to talk about what the things that Erendira had to do in order to pay back her grandmother for what she had done. The impacts that this book have on the audience is very shocking because Erendira grandmother sells her into prostitution in order for her to pay her back for the th The author purpose of writing ‘’Innocent Erendira’’ is to show the way a twelve year old named Erendira lives with her grandmother and what she goes through. Another reason why the author purpose of writing this story is to talk about what the things that Erendira had to do in order to pay back her grandmother for what she had done. The impacts that this book have on the audience is very shocking because Erendira grandmother sells her into prostitution in order for her to pay her back for the thing she had done. A big impact that this book have on its audience is that while Erendira sells her body she falls in love with a boy named Ulises. Another shocking impact that this book can have is that Erendira and her grandmother travel all over for several years to sell Erendira body with men lining up for miles to enjoy her. The book ‘’Innocent Erendira ‘’ is well written because it explains everything about Erendira and the things that her grandmother made her do. An example from the text is that when Erendira burns down her grandmother house, she was force to pay her back by selling her body. Another example from the text is how her grandmother makes a business in the middle of the desert to sell and make money from Erendira body. The book is very captivating because it tells you everything that Erendira went through and all the pain that her grandmother made her go through in order for her to pay her back. Innocent Erendira is a very serious story because Erendira had to go through very bad things in her life. The book is also very dramatic because Erendira wanted to escape from her grandmother, from all the stuff that her grandmother makes her does. The greatest strength in this book is how Erendira at the end escapes from her grandmother, from all the stuff she went through and be free. Another great strength of the book is how Ulises did everything to be with Erendira and to get her free from her grandmother. The greatest weakness on this book is that it really doesn’t tell what happens to Erendira after she is free from her grandmother. I would recommend this book to a friend because is very interesting book. Another reason why I would recommend this book to a friend is because the book explains the pain and sadness the main character went through. I would also highly recommend this book to a friend because the author uses humor and dialogue on the book, an example would be ‘’People who die in the desert don’t go to heaven but to the sea’’.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ken Brimhall

    This is the second time I read Innocent Erendira and her Heartless Grandmother, the first time so long ago I didn't remember much. I would give the book five stars, but when comparing it to One Hundred Years of Solitude, one of the greatest novels ever written, I couldn't give it the same rating. Innocent Erendira has its illuminating moments, the sea and the desert become characters, and reality blends with dreams. This time through, I was amazed at the humor and dialogue, despite it being, for This is the second time I read Innocent Erendira and her Heartless Grandmother, the first time so long ago I didn't remember much. I would give the book five stars, but when comparing it to One Hundred Years of Solitude, one of the greatest novels ever written, I couldn't give it the same rating. Innocent Erendira has its illuminating moments, the sea and the desert become characters, and reality blends with dreams. This time through, I was amazed at the humor and dialogue, despite it being, for the most part, a sad tale. Examples would be "People who die in the desert don't go to heaven but to the sea," and "The sea is like the desert but with water." Other stories include A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings, and The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World, but the story I liked second best was The Sea of Lost Time, where a city lies beneath the sea, next to a desert village. Mr. Herbert, a character in the story says, "Just imagine the disorder there'd be in the world if people found out about such things." The stories made me want to reread One Hundred Years of Solitude.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Polo

    “Innocent Eréndira” is one of my favorite, if not my favorite, works by this author. Though incredibly saddening, this novella uses beautiful imagery that makes it easier to deal with the darker subject matters. Despite the frustration I felt by some of this character’s decisions, Eréndira is a lovable character one cannot help but feel empathy towards. Those frustrations become irrelevant with the unforeseen ending, which I found very uplifting. In response to some of the reviews, I don’t think “Innocent Eréndira” is one of my favorite, if not my favorite, works by this author. Though incredibly saddening, this novella uses beautiful imagery that makes it easier to deal with the darker subject matters. Despite the frustration I felt by some of this character’s decisions, Eréndira is a lovable character one cannot help but feel empathy towards. Those frustrations become irrelevant with the unforeseen ending, which I found very uplifting. In response to some of the reviews, I don’t think this makes Gabo a pessimist. Yes, he is showing an unpleasant, yet real, side of society, but I believe he has stated that his intention is to make readers reflect and improve themselves. I believe he specifically said that in an interview promoting “News of a Kidnapping.” I read “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” and “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” both in English and Spanish, and I found this to be a very accurate translation. These are also intriguing and beautiful stories. I love “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” but I think Gabo’s short stories are magical realism at its finest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I don't think this was a good choice for a first time reader of Márquez? I found it a bit too random, yet I quite like the 'magical-realism' genre. I'd heard a lot about this author & friends with similar tastes had recommended him, so I expected to love it. Maybe that expectation was part of the problem. In the end I have paused two thirds of the way through, and I will try another of his works. Then perhaps I will come back to this one when I am more familiar with his writing (after checking the I don't think this was a good choice for a first time reader of Márquez? I found it a bit too random, yet I quite like the 'magical-realism' genre. I'd heard a lot about this author & friends with similar tastes had recommended him, so I expected to love it. Maybe that expectation was part of the problem. In the end I have paused two thirds of the way through, and I will try another of his works. Then perhaps I will come back to this one when I am more familiar with his writing (after checking the dates of these stories, I can see that they were very early works of his). Maybe I will try 'One Hundred Years of Solitude', which seems to have been on my bookcase forever..."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Is it very controversial for me to give Gabo 3 stars? I just found that after the main event (Which I actually finished like 3 years ago now) of Erendire's tale I couldn't connect with the other short stories in the book. I do wonder if partly it's a translation issue though. Just as with another book I have from the same series and same translator (not the one he has openly complimented either!) I found certain phrases just jumping out or jarring with me because they didn't sound natural in any Is it very controversial for me to give Gabo 3 stars? I just found that after the main event (Which I actually finished like 3 years ago now) of Erendire's tale I couldn't connect with the other short stories in the book. I do wonder if partly it's a translation issue though. Just as with another book I have from the same series and same translator (not the one he has openly complimented either!) I found certain phrases just jumping out or jarring with me because they didn't sound natural in any way. Having not read any Gabo in Spanish I guess I wouldn't know whether he sounds natural either... but it just got me off on the wrong foot.

  24. 4 out of 5

    jeremy

    composed of the title novella and eleven other short stories, innocent erendira features some twenty-five years of garcia marquez's earlier, briefer writings. more than half of the included stories were penned in his early 20's, and while they demonstrate a young talent, they are hardly comparable to his more mature outings. amongst the collection's best pieces are "innocent erendira," "the sea of lost time," "eyes of a blue dog," and "the woman who came at six o'clock."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    A collection of short stories, by Nobel prize winning Columbian, Marquez. The title story is about a young girl who accidentally sets fire to her grandmother's house and is forced into prostitution to pay for the damage. One story is a about huge man with wings and a woman with a spider's face. One story has no punctuation other than the odd comma. But strangely compelling. Have to admit though, some might have made more sense to me in the original Spanish!

  26. 4 out of 5

    anðre

    I like that one where they catch an angel and they sell tickets for people to see it and then they burn it with hot iron because it was not moving inside the cage. Casually torturing angels for some money

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ely

    I can't decide whether this was a good place or not to start with Gabriel Garcia Marquez—I guess I'll make my mind up when I read some more. I do really like his writing, but not so much what he's writing about. I don't know how that works. More thoughts on this later!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    I love G.G Marquez because his books are so good. Confusing and you really have to read it carefully if you want to understand what is it really about. I felt so bad for Erendira and that story was really a huge highlight of the book. Really, if you love Marquez, you're gonna love this book. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yomna hosny

    Marquez has a gift for creating characters that are alluring and devastating ..

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gazelle

    It is obvious to most readers that Marquez is one of the best short story writers. But this moving collection transferred me to the magical world he illustrated delicately in this piece.

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