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Alaska Sampler 2014: Ten Authors from the Great Land: Fiction - Biography - Memoir - Humor

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Would the real Alaska please stand up? This was the challenge put to ten of Alaska’s finest authors: to share unique and intimate perspectives—some previously published, some new to this volume—that reach beyond the usual stereotypes to an Alaska that can’t be packaged or staged. These stories, musings, and rants come from authors whose roots run deep in the Far North. T Would the real Alaska please stand up? This was the challenge put to ten of Alaska’s finest authors: to share unique and intimate perspectives—some previously published, some new to this volume—that reach beyond the usual stereotypes to an Alaska that can’t be packaged or staged. These stories, musings, and rants come from authors whose roots run deep in the Far North. There’s Dana Stabenow, author of more than thirty novels, who was raised on 75-foot fish tender in the Gulf of Alaska—she knew there had to be a warmer, drier job out there somewhere. And there’s David Marusek, who writes full time in his low-maintenance cabin near Fairbanks, Alaska, producing fiction that’s “ferociously smart, [and] simultaneously horrific and funny,” according to Publishers Weekly. The Alaska Sampler features memoir by Leigh Newman, whose Great Alaskan Dad taught her to fish, hunt, curl up and play dead in the case of curious black bears, and to throw up artfully in the hood of parka while flying in a single prop plane. Another memoir comes from Jan Harper Haines, whose stories of floods and ghosts were passed down by her Koyukon Athabascan mother. From forty-five years in Alaska, including twelve as editor of the Anchorage Daily News, Howard Weaver takes a fresh look at how the state is changing (and not for the better). Another longtime Alaskan, Kaylene Johnson, recounts a death-defying journey by adventurer Dick Griffith. On the lighter side, science writer Ned Rozell gives voice to one of Alaska’s ubiquitous ravens, who has a score or two to settle with us humans. In fiction, longtime Alaskan Deb Vanasse writes of a woman obsessed with a glacier, while Don Rearden transports us to the tundra with a story that sheds light on everyday struggles in rural Alaska. In novel excerpts by Tanyo Ravicz, a young family faces violent weather, wild bears, illness, isolation, and the intrusion of poachers on Kodiak Island. Long after you finish, the stories, characters, and images of these authors will linger. Be forewarned: you’ll want to read more.


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Would the real Alaska please stand up? This was the challenge put to ten of Alaska’s finest authors: to share unique and intimate perspectives—some previously published, some new to this volume—that reach beyond the usual stereotypes to an Alaska that can’t be packaged or staged. These stories, musings, and rants come from authors whose roots run deep in the Far North. T Would the real Alaska please stand up? This was the challenge put to ten of Alaska’s finest authors: to share unique and intimate perspectives—some previously published, some new to this volume—that reach beyond the usual stereotypes to an Alaska that can’t be packaged or staged. These stories, musings, and rants come from authors whose roots run deep in the Far North. There’s Dana Stabenow, author of more than thirty novels, who was raised on 75-foot fish tender in the Gulf of Alaska—she knew there had to be a warmer, drier job out there somewhere. And there’s David Marusek, who writes full time in his low-maintenance cabin near Fairbanks, Alaska, producing fiction that’s “ferociously smart, [and] simultaneously horrific and funny,” according to Publishers Weekly. The Alaska Sampler features memoir by Leigh Newman, whose Great Alaskan Dad taught her to fish, hunt, curl up and play dead in the case of curious black bears, and to throw up artfully in the hood of parka while flying in a single prop plane. Another memoir comes from Jan Harper Haines, whose stories of floods and ghosts were passed down by her Koyukon Athabascan mother. From forty-five years in Alaska, including twelve as editor of the Anchorage Daily News, Howard Weaver takes a fresh look at how the state is changing (and not for the better). Another longtime Alaskan, Kaylene Johnson, recounts a death-defying journey by adventurer Dick Griffith. On the lighter side, science writer Ned Rozell gives voice to one of Alaska’s ubiquitous ravens, who has a score or two to settle with us humans. In fiction, longtime Alaskan Deb Vanasse writes of a woman obsessed with a glacier, while Don Rearden transports us to the tundra with a story that sheds light on everyday struggles in rural Alaska. In novel excerpts by Tanyo Ravicz, a young family faces violent weather, wild bears, illness, isolation, and the intrusion of poachers on Kodiak Island. Long after you finish, the stories, characters, and images of these authors will linger. Be forewarned: you’ll want to read more.

30 review for Alaska Sampler 2014: Ten Authors from the Great Land: Fiction - Biography - Memoir - Humor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Catalina

    I now understand better the term "sampler" in the title of this book, as many of the entries are snippets from larger novels. I admit that I would enjoy reading more of most of them. As someone about to embark upon her first journey to Alaska, this book of short stories did pique my curiosity about this wild state and satisfied my desire to get some initial impressions of the landscape.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sandy from Alaska Colón

    Downloaded free from www.runningfoxbooks.com Downloaded free from www.runningfoxbooks.com

  3. 4 out of 5

    Red

    This is a collection of writings. Not all are short stories. Not all are fiction. Some are portions of larger, unfinished works. All are interesting. Many viewpoints from Alaskan natives, to immigrants, to hopefuls, to birds. All of the stories make you feel something.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Russell K. Kudo

    True Life Drama Lived and camped in Alaska. Challenges represented in stories very accurate and varied. Reason so many series on the 49th state.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Enjoyed reading these short selections during a scenic train vacation in Alaska. I hope to delve further into some of the complete works.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Brasher

    This is a free collection of short stories, non-fiction/memoir, and excerpts from larger works. It’s good reading and shows a lot of different faces of Alaska. Most enjoyable to me were “A Time Machine Called the Chilkoot Trail” by Dana Stabenow, an excerpt from “Still Points North” by Leigh Newman, “On Ice” by Deb Vanasse, excerpts from “Wildwood” by Tanyo Ravicz and “From Cold River Spirits” by Jan Harper-Haines. If you’re interesting in the fascinating place that is Alaska, or just up for som This is a free collection of short stories, non-fiction/memoir, and excerpts from larger works. It’s good reading and shows a lot of different faces of Alaska. Most enjoyable to me were “A Time Machine Called the Chilkoot Trail” by Dana Stabenow, an excerpt from “Still Points North” by Leigh Newman, “On Ice” by Deb Vanasse, excerpts from “Wildwood” by Tanyo Ravicz and “From Cold River Spirits” by Jan Harper-Haines. If you’re interesting in the fascinating place that is Alaska, or just up for something a little different, try the Alaska Sampler 2014. And it looks like the Alaska Sampler 2015 is out now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nancye

    Give me a book about Alaska that includes Dana Stabenow and I am a happy camper. This one gives you a range of options for short stories based in Alaska. Definitely recommended reading even if you have never visited the state. But beware, you will probably want to go after reading this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathie

    It is hard to rate this book because it is a collection of stories by different authors. Most told of the harsh life in Alaska, the bitter cold, the wildlife, and a little about those native to the area and those who are attracted to the area as an adopted home.

  9. 5 out of 5

    kc

    Not for me.. Quit well before finishing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    There are some great pieces in here, and all of them are pretty darn good. Definitely going to track down the full versions and/or other works by these Alaskan authors!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Several wonderful stories about folks who live or have lived in Alaska. It gave we a wide view of the folks who call Alaska home.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Liked the variety of stories.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lotus

  15. 5 out of 5

    nancy flann

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Bagley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vic

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Costigan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kate Reschner

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen Appleby

  26. 4 out of 5

    lane noyes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam Childs

  28. 5 out of 5

    L Holt

  29. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Lowry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Becky Almon

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