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The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World

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There's no doubt that technology has overrun our lives. Over the past few decades, the world has embraced "progress" and we're living with the resultant clicking, beeping, anxiety-inducing frenzy. But a creative backlash is gathering steam, helping us cope with the avalanche of data that threatens to overwhelm us daily through our computers, tablets, and smartphones. Digita There's no doubt that technology has overrun our lives. Over the past few decades, the world has embraced "progress" and we're living with the resultant clicking, beeping, anxiety-inducing frenzy. But a creative backlash is gathering steam, helping us cope with the avalanche of data that threatens to overwhelm us daily through our computers, tablets, and smartphones. Digital Detox considers the technologically focused life, with its impacts on our children, relationships, communities, health, work, and more, and suggests opportunities for those of us longing to cultivate a richer on- and off-line existence. By examining the connected world through the lens of her own internet fast, Christina Crook creates a convincing case for increasing intentionality in our day-to-day lives. Using historical data, typewritten letters, chapter challenges, and personal accounts, she invites us to explore a new way of living, beyond our steady state of distracted connectedness. Most of us can't throw away our smart phone or cut ourselves off from the internet. But we can all rethink our relationship with the digital world, discovering new ways of introducing balance and discipline to the role of technology in our lives. This book is a must read for anyone wishing to rediscover quietness of mind and seeking a sense of peace amidst the cacophony of the modern world. Christina Crook is a wordsmith and communications professional and instigator of the project Letters from a Luddite, which chronicled her thirty-one day internet fast and fueled her passion for exploring the intersection of technology, relationships, and joy.


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There's no doubt that technology has overrun our lives. Over the past few decades, the world has embraced "progress" and we're living with the resultant clicking, beeping, anxiety-inducing frenzy. But a creative backlash is gathering steam, helping us cope with the avalanche of data that threatens to overwhelm us daily through our computers, tablets, and smartphones. Digita There's no doubt that technology has overrun our lives. Over the past few decades, the world has embraced "progress" and we're living with the resultant clicking, beeping, anxiety-inducing frenzy. But a creative backlash is gathering steam, helping us cope with the avalanche of data that threatens to overwhelm us daily through our computers, tablets, and smartphones. Digital Detox considers the technologically focused life, with its impacts on our children, relationships, communities, health, work, and more, and suggests opportunities for those of us longing to cultivate a richer on- and off-line existence. By examining the connected world through the lens of her own internet fast, Christina Crook creates a convincing case for increasing intentionality in our day-to-day lives. Using historical data, typewritten letters, chapter challenges, and personal accounts, she invites us to explore a new way of living, beyond our steady state of distracted connectedness. Most of us can't throw away our smart phone or cut ourselves off from the internet. But we can all rethink our relationship with the digital world, discovering new ways of introducing balance and discipline to the role of technology in our lives. This book is a must read for anyone wishing to rediscover quietness of mind and seeking a sense of peace amidst the cacophony of the modern world. Christina Crook is a wordsmith and communications professional and instigator of the project Letters from a Luddite, which chronicled her thirty-one day internet fast and fueled her passion for exploring the intersection of technology, relationships, and joy.

30 review for The Joy of Missing Out: Finding Balance in a Wired World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review. The book covers the challenges and solutions as well as the ramifications to our neglected selves through the 30 day experiment conducted by the author. During this time, she unplugged her life from all instant media. Including all things that most of us in the developed world use hourly, daily, (if not constantly) for work, entertainment and human interactions. She made some very valid points. Very fe I received a free copy of this book from Goodreads First Reads in exchange for an honest review. The book covers the challenges and solutions as well as the ramifications to our neglected selves through the 30 day experiment conducted by the author. During this time, she unplugged her life from all instant media. Including all things that most of us in the developed world use hourly, daily, (if not constantly) for work, entertainment and human interactions. She made some very valid points. Very few people pick up their phones to call anyone anymore. We rely heavily on social media to tell us how our friends and family are doing. Rarely does anyone paint their life in an accurate light by these means. In the age of enlightenment, we are forgetting to be human. As a computer/tablet/smartphone user, I have become accustomed to having information at my fingertips. Like many, I have given up reading the newspaper, going to the library for research, or buying birthday cards. I can complete all of these tasks at home in my jammies in a matter of minutes. I find that, as the writer explains, I become frustrated with waiting for anything. I have slowly evolved into a self-sustaining information sponge that is quickly losing social skills. Like many, I prefer to shop online to avoid people and hassles. There was a time when I loved the bustle of city life. Through technology, the easier ways has overpowered the healthier (both mental and physical) ways. I tried the experiment for one day. When realizing that not having my phone also meant I also could not tell what time it was- it did made for an interesting and stressful day. Calling contacts while searching through the phonebook taught me that I am was ill prepared for my quest. It only got worse from there. When I got home that night, I vowed I would never leave my phone home again. In all, the subjects presented in the book made me think. I find that standing in line for my coffee is less stressful because I no longer look at my barista and the others in front of me as machines. I see them clearer as humans. I have made a point to smile at others, saying please and thank you more. While it may be impossible to live in a wireless-free world. There is a balance to be found. Some of my favorite evenings are spent with family, playing cards, my phone tucked forgotten in my purse deposited in another room of the house. Laughter is infectious, and memories made with people are more vivid than the text messages I have sent or received. And I always LOVE sitting in a quiet room, curled up in my favorite chair, my dog at my side, and a great BOOK in my hand. Balance. The author gave a ton of great suggestions, included lots of facts in our evolving technological age to date. My hat is off to her lasting the 30 days AND still maintaining a online blog. The typewriter alone would have killed me! As a woman with dyslexia, auto correct is my bestest of friends! This book is worth the read. Happy Reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    When I was contacted if I wanted to do a book review as a follow-up to the post on the JOMO diet I did a while back, I was delighted. Not only did this feel like a huge validation for a blog that is still growing, but it also meant that someone had gone and done this and had a wealth of personal insights to share. Excellent!Expanding upon her TEDx talk, Christina wrote down in detail how she feels that while technology is a boon, there is also another side to the story. Reinforcing her beliefs w When I was contacted if I wanted to do a book review as a follow-up to the post on the JOMO diet I did a while back, I was delighted. Not only did this feel like a huge validation for a blog that is still growing, but it also meant that someone had gone and done this and had a wealth of personal insights to share. Excellent!Expanding upon her TEDx talk, Christina wrote down in detail how she feels that while technology is a boon, there is also another side to the story. Reinforcing her beliefs with excerpts from other great works such as Nicholas Carr’s The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains we learn more of the price we pay for living in a world that is ‘always on’.Christina then introduces us to her 1 month internet fast, and how she went about this. She acknowledges that it can be difficult for some to do this. However reading about the experience is quite inspiring even if we do not go as far ourselves. I personally felt a certain sense of nostalgia because I’ve known the world before we had the internet and mobile phones. Her letters to her friends brought back pleasant memories of having pen pals and the care that went into picking a nice stationary and sharing your thoughts and experiences on paper before putting them into the envelope and mailing it out by post. And the happiness you felt when you received a letter back. I think for younger generations it can be an interesting learning experience too, to discover how basic things we take for granted take more effort and consideration when you take the technology away.A fast is common in many religions in order to experience one’s faith much stronger as well as grow in it, and even though you might not consider yourself religious there is something to be had in it. Disconnecting yourself forces you to be more present and aware, as Christina herself discovered. It also instils gratitude for that we never questioned. And even after we return to our old ways the lessons from the experience will stay with us and allow us to have a more balanced experience.One final consideration of our connectedness is how it can make us unhappy without even realizing it. Social media is often a façade on which most are inclined to only share the best and even play a persona that is not their true self. Watch how many likes we get when we post a happy picture or status update, but when we have some bad news to share there can be an awkward silence. In extreme cases, which I’ve personally experienced, others will unfriend you because you are ‘a downer’. Is this not unfortunate that the technology which allows us to share our human experiences is seemingly only reserved for that which is nice or funny? No wonder then that we start to question ourselves or feel we are not good enough when our friend posts pictures of their latest vacation while we would risk our financial health doing the same.If this has piqued your interest even a little, I encourage you to pick up the book. It’s a small price for something that may vastly improve your happiness and sense of balance in today’s world. I also encourage you to implement the lessons in your life as suits you best and when you do to lead by example as Christina does. Practice good discipline in what feels right for you so that your partner, children, family and friends see that things can be done differently in a way that works and brings joy. If we do this and spread it then we will all benefit and technology once again will become a blessing rather than a curse.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yellowoasis

    This book is light on evidence and heavy on anecdote. I was hoping for something a bit more meaty. Ironically, for a book that advocates deep engagement, I found the thesis to be rather shallow and smug. I feel it’s a ‘once-over-lightly’ for the already converted rather than designed to challenge attitudes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Boon

    Based on the book's description, I was really looking forward to reading it. When I got it, however, my first warning that it was going to be thin on evidence and long on anecdote was the hippy dippy press from Gabriola Island that published it. By the time I got to the author's timeline, in which she outlines the development of new technologies and just happens to include stats on mental illness, I'd had enough. Correlation is not causation - if you want to make a case about Web connectivity dr Based on the book's description, I was really looking forward to reading it. When I got it, however, my first warning that it was going to be thin on evidence and long on anecdote was the hippy dippy press from Gabriola Island that published it. By the time I got to the author's timeline, in which she outlines the development of new technologies and just happens to include stats on mental illness, I'd had enough. Correlation is not causation - if you want to make a case about Web connectivity driving increased rates of mental illness, then do it in an informed way, with data and evidence to back you up. Just putting it in a timeline is weak and irrelevant. That's pretty much where I stopped reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    I found myself really impacted by this book. While it went a little long, and became a little preachy by the end, I did embrace the concepts. I have taken FB application off my phone, stopped watching endless amounts of TV without purpose, stopped surfing while watching TV (as have my whole family), stopped checking email as if it were a nervous tic. I'm considering adding in writing letters and picking up my writing books again. I've already started reading more. I find myself less anxious and I found myself really impacted by this book. While it went a little long, and became a little preachy by the end, I did embrace the concepts. I have taken FB application off my phone, stopped watching endless amounts of TV without purpose, stopped surfing while watching TV (as have my whole family), stopped checking email as if it were a nervous tic. I'm considering adding in writing letters and picking up my writing books again. I've already started reading more. I find myself less anxious and somewhat less distracted already. I anticipate that after a week or more of this not-quite-a-fast, I'll be considerably less anxious which is my goal.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    If I could, I'd give this 3 1/2 stars. I didn't love it and it's not the best book I've read on this subject, but the author does bring up some good points. The book at times felt more like a blog though. Maybe it's because the other book I'm reading is full of solid references that my expectations here were higher, but it seemed like even when the author referenced studies, the references were rather vague. It also became repetitive at times. I do agree with some of the observations, however. 2- If I could, I'd give this 3 1/2 stars. I didn't love it and it's not the best book I've read on this subject, but the author does bring up some good points. The book at times felt more like a blog though. Maybe it's because the other book I'm reading is full of solid references that my expectations here were higher, but it seemed like even when the author referenced studies, the references were rather vague. It also became repetitive at times. I do agree with some of the observations, however. 2-3 years ago, I started tech-no Sundays. I was working far too many hours and needed the complete break once a week. I'd turn all my gadgets off and turn off the wifi Saturday night and not turn it on again until Monday morning when I'd start another too-long workweek. I got out of the habit when I changed jobs and drastically cut my working hours back, but I do still take breaks now and then and can see an advantage to reinstating those tech-no Sundays once again. I agree with the author's feeling that technology is a good thing, but something that we can (and often do) easily abuse. It's far too easy to check in on social media rather than walk outside and enjoy the beauty of nature and the companionship of friends and family face-to-face. Social media keeps interactions at arm's length, keeping us less engaged. Most people only share the good so it's easy to feel less than when we compare our lives to that we see online. Reactions are dulled. If something gets uncomfortable, we can simply click away, choosing not to deal with it or being momentarily outraged but easily distracted by the next shiny news story that pops up. Early in the book, the author mentions that younger generations are lacking the ability to read facial expressions and body language. So much of their communication is done virtually that they haven't developed those skills. Even when in the presence of others, many of us are still attached to our devices. Look around a restaurant and notice how many people you see on their phones rather than really paying attention to those sitting just a couple feet away. Many of us don't even take time to know ourselves, filling every moment with digital entertainment and superficial communication. It's time to take back our time and really live our lives. Slow down, disconnect more and be more present in our lives. Everything need not be documented as proof it happened. Technology has made a lot of things easier and can be used in very positive ways, but we need to pay more attention to how we use it and step away when it is interfering with actually living a full life.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Loreli

    Christina is brings up the subject in a knowledgeable and relatable way - how our being continually plugged in has effects/consequences that we should face/deal with. I finished the book feeling inspired to make changes in my life. I don't think it's an accident that I didn't post on Facebook for a couple weeks (and I have had a daily habit for several years). Just enjoyed the detox. Pairs nicely with Nicholas Carr's The Shallows.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lara Van Hulzen

    Most books on this topic can be extreme - this is bad! Run away! Dont' look back! But this was different. With fascinating, and sometimes frightening, statistics & research, Christina shows how technology is changing not only our world, but us as people. Taking a 31 day fast from technology, she discovered she loves email and has more time in a day when she doesn't scroll media every 10 min. Her bottom line message is balance. And I appreciated that. Most books on this topic can be extreme - this is bad! Run away! Dont' look back! But this was different. With fascinating, and sometimes frightening, statistics & research, Christina shows how technology is changing not only our world, but us as people. Taking a 31 day fast from technology, she discovered she loves email and has more time in a day when she doesn't scroll media every 10 min. Her bottom line message is balance. And I appreciated that.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cliff Dolph

    I'll start this review with a possibly trivial criticism: When there are long quotes in Christina Crook's The Joy of Missing Out, they are indented AND in quotation marks. Unless the rules changed while I wasn't looking, indenting a paragraph-length quote shows that it is quoted, making the quotation marks redundant. Having them there bugs me. That minor annoyance points to what may be a larger flaw: There are a lot of long quotes, and a lot of quotes generally, in this book. The result is often I'll start this review with a possibly trivial criticism: When there are long quotes in Christina Crook's The Joy of Missing Out, they are indented AND in quotation marks. Unless the rules changed while I wasn't looking, indenting a paragraph-length quote shows that it is quoted, making the quotation marks redundant. Having them there bugs me. That minor annoyance points to what may be a larger flaw: There are a lot of long quotes, and a lot of quotes generally, in this book. The result is often a patchwork effect, which makes it difficult to keep a sense of the author's voice (too bad, because it is a trustworthy and engaging voice) and raises the question of whether Crook has her own view on this issue or has simply compiled the views of others. To be fair, the answer to that question is that she does have her own view, stemming in no small part from her 31-day fast from the Internet. The book is most interesting and most convincing when she shares that personal experience (except when she repeats stories, which she does several times). I know she did write a book about that fast, which maybe means I chose the wrong book. To further complicate my criticism, I must admit that I often appreciated her choice of writers to quote. She frequently brings in Brene Brown and Wendell Berry, two authors who have for me the status of modern-day prophets. I read this book because it was highly recommended by a math professor who talked to students at our school about the pitfalls of smartphones. While Crook's book did not, for me, live up to the hype, it does tackle a really important issue. She makes a strong case and offers practical concrete steps for balancing our use of technology. Sometimes, while reading this book, I found myself wondering if she is just one of those voices crying out in futility against the inexorable process of change. When she talks in especially broad terms about our dependence on technology, she can come across as a Luddite. But in the end (again, speaking for myself) the evidence and her argument reached critical mass, and I feel convinced that a great deal is at stake if we continue, without self-examination, to spend more of our time interacting with screens and less of it looking each other in the face and immersing ourselves in the natural world. What saves her from being dismissed as a Luddite is the fact that she uses and appreciates the Internet. She understands its power for good, so she is not calling for a permanent renunciation of cyberspace. Rather, she is making the case for balance and intentionality. And while I wish she had let her own voice come through more consistently in making that case, and that she had been more careful to avoid redundancy of anecdotes and sentiments in the process, she does in the end make a reasonably convincing and genuinely important case. I found myself reading sentences aloud more often with this book than with most, and that is always a good sign. Final analysis: The Joy of Missing Out is flawed, but ultimately it offers a valid and valuable perspective on a vitally important aspect of our lives. Christina Crook is onto something, and even if her achievement consists largely of curating the wisdom of others who are onto the same thing, it's something just about all of us need to think about. She's worth a read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Hall

    Reading this book, I started wondering: will always-on connection change the world the same way electricity did? Although it's true that "giving up the night" to entertainment, work and lack of sleep made human lives less natural, healthy and balanced, this decision also made nights unfathomably more stimulating. The impressionable animals that we are, I'm assuming that few people today would argue that things were better when darkness was still, for most intents and purposes, darkness. So: it's n Reading this book, I started wondering: will always-on connection change the world the same way electricity did? Although it's true that "giving up the night" to entertainment, work and lack of sleep made human lives less natural, healthy and balanced, this decision also made nights unfathomably more stimulating. The impressionable animals that we are, I'm assuming that few people today would argue that things were better when darkness was still, for most intents and purposes, darkness. So: it's now 2019. Electricity is an unquestionable given, with always-on internet increasingly so; 4G internet and wifi are almost considered fundamental human rights; babies learn how to use touchscreen before the age of 2. Even sending an e-mail now seems so quaintly passé. Writing letters really makes a personal difference, but how about sending a well thought out video message? Under the reign of social media, never did more people suffer from social anxiety; yet how many people really care about humanity being over-connected? When a handful of behemoth corporations rule the digital landscape, can you imagine a more Faustian bargain than what has you clicking "I Agree"? Reacting to this often comes across as more like a call to stand out rather than calm down. Yet I suspect that the reason everyone online seems entranced is that the people who aren't are just, well... not online. It's been almost three months since I read this one and a lot of it has slipped my mind. I did enjoy it though and it made me realise that regardless of it currently being inexplicably trendy to replace every kind of actual connection or friendship with ethereal, weightless counterparts, the truth deep down is simple: screenless, actual human connection is impossible to substitute. It can be built upon, sure; it can be expanded. But why replace it completely as we seem so set in doing? Life in the digital world cannot and should not exist without its real-life anchoring, the same way you shouldn't go chop off your legs because you have a car; not only would you then not be able to use the car, you'd never be able to enjoy walking for the sake of moving by just using your own two legs again. Got your pen and paper for sending snail-mail letters to friends yet? "The Joy of Missing Out" is as romantic as it is poignant, and it inspired me to put my own feelings about over-connection into creating a sort of Alcoholics Anonymous/social club for internet addicts that wish to replace at least part of our draining, flavorless, virtual pseudo-connectedness or the obsession with infinite novelty with nourishing, memorable human connection and limited, focused, less ambitious, if you will, entertainment. The book didn't reveal to me what the "joy" of missing out might be, but it's true: "The Necessary Evil of Missing Out" wouldn't quite sound as attractive. And writing all this now, the words that come to my mind is that making choices is the only way to go around in the world. So really, there is no alternative to making the sometimes tough, sometimes disciplined, sometimes cruel choice. The only way out is through, right?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Breki

    This review is difficult to write, because while I agree with the fundamental feeling that must have inspired this book, the book itself is a poorly researched, poorly written and poorly thought through excuse. The plural of anecdote is not fact, something the author should try to remember. Just because she ran into an old friend randomly during her Internet fast doesn't mean that the universe is somehow arranged to give us the things we want just because we look up from our screens. Also; the len This review is difficult to write, because while I agree with the fundamental feeling that must have inspired this book, the book itself is a poorly researched, poorly written and poorly thought through excuse. The plural of anecdote is not fact, something the author should try to remember. Just because she ran into an old friend randomly during her Internet fast doesn't mean that the universe is somehow arranged to give us the things we want just because we look up from our screens. Also; the lenth of the list of disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has nothing to do with the development of modern technologies, so why is the author listing the two as if they are somehow connected? This is never explained in the book, but just feels like some kind of scare tactic. We might as well talk about how global warming has increased at the same time as the practice of slavery has decreased - but that doesn't mean that the lack of slaves is causing global warming... The author talks about "The Internet" as if there is an equals sign between "Internet" and "Social Media". It is quite possible for people to use the Internet without blogging, posting images on Instagram, scouring Twitter and maintaining a social presence on Facebook. What she's actually arguing against in her book is the shift of social interaction from the "Real World" into small pockets on the Internet, but somewhere in the midst of her diatribe she forgets this and begins to blame all of the Internet for the problems that social media can cause. It's the old "Throwing out the baby with the bath water" problem all over again. I would recommend that nobody ever reads this book, as the entire premise can be replaced with "Try to interact with people in real life rather than on the Internet. Oh, and encourage your children to do the same."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lo

    It was OK - a great motivational read, with some exercises that I didn't bother doing because I already don't own a smartphone and am long since past being tempted by social media notification pings. Still, I need my little bit of digital dopamine fixes every once in a while, and this is a good book for beginners to figure out what that means in a broader sense. I knocked off an entire star for just the fact that I wish Cook had included proper footnotes and citations for some of her quotes and It was OK - a great motivational read, with some exercises that I didn't bother doing because I already don't own a smartphone and am long since past being tempted by social media notification pings. Still, I need my little bit of digital dopamine fixes every once in a while, and this is a good book for beginners to figure out what that means in a broader sense. I knocked off an entire star for just the fact that I wish Cook had included proper footnotes and citations for some of her quotes and sources... she cites a lot of references that I'm interested in looking into and the bibliography at the back isn't quite enough, and some of her assertions have no biblographical reference point at all.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Helpful book about what it means to live in our current “digitally connected” world. The author quoted extensively from Sherry Turkle (Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle is probably the best book I have read on this topic) and Brene Brown, who I would also recommend (though her writing covers more topics than the “digital age” conversation). I also come away from books like this thinking, “I really need to read Wendell Berry!” He seems to be quoted a lot in books that talk about living slo Helpful book about what it means to live in our current “digitally connected” world. The author quoted extensively from Sherry Turkle (Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle is probably the best book I have read on this topic) and Brene Brown, who I would also recommend (though her writing covers more topics than the “digital age” conversation). I also come away from books like this thinking, “I really need to read Wendell Berry!” He seems to be quoted a lot in books that talk about living slowly and well.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Wharton

    She talks about the importance of being involved with the people around us and finding balance in our lives instead of feeling the compulsion to check your phone multiple times a day. She talks about how we think we are making things easier and simpler by multitasking and connection with people on FB and via text... but it actually makes life more stressful and creates more superficial relationships

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Mifsud

    A beautiful book, aimed at people wanting to use the internet less. Its written so beautifully with compassion, excellent references and practical ideas. It just makes sense. I love that she uses unusual words too, I had to get the dictionary out a few times to look up the meaning but that made me like the book more. Its poetic, real and motivating. I highly recommend this book to anyone who feels overloaded with information and the demands of attention from the web.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

    I don’t often write reviews, but I think this book is an important read for everyone of this era. As a young adult myself, I do find myself sucked into the rabbit hole of the web (Goodreads included, ironically enough). It’s important for everyone to take a step back and reconsider what they’re trying to achieve through the use of the Internet. This book reminds us of that important idea and gives steps to achieve it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Doesn't flow well as an audiobook, because of the reflections and chapter challenges, but it's a great book if you find yourself sucked into social media and are looking for some self-reflection to get out or take a break. Includes great quotes from other well-known authors like Brené Brown.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cat Caird

    I found this book so helpful and challenging, especially as I think through my own use of the internet and smart phone.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Crook makes a very good case for limiting our access to the internet, and even lays out a plan to quit our digital entanglement at the end of the book. I found it very compelling!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Seth C

    Now a classic Published only seven years ago, this one is now a classic, but a must read for anyone interested in learning more about our technology-obsessed culture.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Smith

    It was alright. Nothing you didn't already know. Published in 2015 and felt a bit dated.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anneli

    I teach summer enrichment writing courses with high school students and this book was a wonderful resource. I specifically wanted to challenge my students to consider how much of their daily communication and relationship building is carried out via screens and text, and reading part of "The Joy of Missing Out" together was an excellent way to get the students thinking critically in a positive and reflective way. JOMO is a great text for students because the prose is appropriately challenging by I teach summer enrichment writing courses with high school students and this book was a wonderful resource. I specifically wanted to challenge my students to consider how much of their daily communication and relationship building is carried out via screens and text, and reading part of "The Joy of Missing Out" together was an excellent way to get the students thinking critically in a positive and reflective way. JOMO is a great text for students because the prose is appropriately challenging by also lyrically engaging and framed by Crook's personal experience, excellent facts, quotes and statistics. As part of the class, I required that the students (age 14-17) give up all electronics and screens for 60 min, persuade 2 or more friends to join them, and then write an essay about the experience. Though initially resistant to the idea, all the students fulfilled the requirement of the assignment and we had a fantastic class discussion over their experience. I absolutely recommend this book to educators seeking an elegant, thoughtful, and engaging text to use with high school or college students to discuss writing, technology and the habits that shape our character. I will definitely be using "The Joy of Missing Out" in future classes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    A very interesting reflection on both the good and the bad of the various technologies that we use each and every day. And the fact that our each and every day are ruled by these technologies. Life today requires that we are connected so that we can keep up and be in the know. But what are we keeping up to and do we really need to know so much of what goes on in other peoples lives?? i.e. social media. If we choose to disconnect it's seen as a problem, fault and maybe even an indiscretion. It's A very interesting reflection on both the good and the bad of the various technologies that we use each and every day. And the fact that our each and every day are ruled by these technologies. Life today requires that we are connected so that we can keep up and be in the know. But what are we keeping up to and do we really need to know so much of what goes on in other peoples lives?? i.e. social media. If we choose to disconnect it's seen as a problem, fault and maybe even an indiscretion. It's all a choice though and sometimes it's ok to be 'missing out' as the title states. Finding the balance is what we need to do and that will look different for everyone. Check out this book. It's worth the read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anna Lussenburg

    I really enjoyed this book. It's engaging and well written and tackles a subject that's long been sidelined in the quest for technological progress. There's been an upside to the internet and our connections of course but there has also been a measurable downside that is becoming more and more clear. As someone who works solving children's behaviour issues, I can tell you I've seen more than my fair share of two year olds glued to i pads. Christina not only points out ways to live a more balance I really enjoyed this book. It's engaging and well written and tackles a subject that's long been sidelined in the quest for technological progress. There's been an upside to the internet and our connections of course but there has also been a measurable downside that is becoming more and more clear. As someone who works solving children's behaviour issues, I can tell you I've seen more than my fair share of two year olds glued to i pads. Christina not only points out ways to live a more balanced life but traces the historical evolution of our collective obsession, one that has removed us so clearly from the life sustaining rhythms of the past. I'm happy she shed light on such an important subject.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pat Rudebusch

    Okay, we all know that we spend too much time on our devices, so do we really need a book to point out the obvious! Probably. Rather than an essay on why technology is ruining us, the author acknowledges both the power of technology to help yes connect, as well as the danger of being so absorbed in it that we disconnect. Anyone who, like me, feels a tinge of annoyance when someone pulls out their phone mid-conversation to find an answer will appreciate the section on how having Google in our poc Okay, we all know that we spend too much time on our devices, so do we really need a book to point out the obvious! Probably. Rather than an essay on why technology is ruining us, the author acknowledges both the power of technology to help yes connect, as well as the danger of being so absorbed in it that we disconnect. Anyone who, like me, feels a tinge of annoyance when someone pulls out their phone mid-conversation to find an answer will appreciate the section on how having Google in our pockets interferes with real conversation. In the end, this a decent book filled with insight and quips of wisdom.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Christina's book is an honest eye-opener about how technology has invaded our homes, our families and quite frankly, our world. JOMO made me reflect on how I could set a better example for my children and make better use of my time. Since I read JOMO I have read more books than ever, am very conscious of not prioritizing my handheld device over my children and focusing on enjoying the moment. It is a great read for anyone who feels a slave to the internet or finds themselves constantly checking Christina's book is an honest eye-opener about how technology has invaded our homes, our families and quite frankly, our world. JOMO made me reflect on how I could set a better example for my children and make better use of my time. Since I read JOMO I have read more books than ever, am very conscious of not prioritizing my handheld device over my children and focusing on enjoying the moment. It is a great read for anyone who feels a slave to the internet or finds themselves constantly checking their devices. It will make you want to get outside and have picnics, ride your bike and play with your children. I recommend it for everyone!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Winnie

    The author states how man invented high technology, and now how these high tech toys like smart phones and internet remake man. A lot of us are so addicted to the digital world, we missed the beauty of real life. This lead me to rethink I should have more control on how much time I spend on Internet, what am I sharing. Or I should spend more time in focusing in my present need : relationship, health, future plans, or even just doing nothing , just relax . Rather than keep ourselves busy by checki The author states how man invented high technology, and now how these high tech toys like smart phones and internet remake man. A lot of us are so addicted to the digital world, we missed the beauty of real life. This lead me to rethink I should have more control on how much time I spend on Internet, what am I sharing. Or I should spend more time in focusing in my present need : relationship, health, future plans, or even just doing nothing , just relax . Rather than keep ourselves busy by checking the digital world whenever we have time.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ian Wooder

    for all of those of you who are addicted to you cell phones, computers, iPods, MP3 players, this is the book for you. It reminded me that there is a whole world out there we used to know and can be discovered yet once again. I would recommend this book to all techie addicts. It is thoroughly enjoyable and gives tips on how to break the habit, and ideas of what to replace the habit with

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    This is one of those titles that I want to pick up again so that I can go back and underline a few key parts. Crook definitely did her research and makes several points in ways that I hadn't before considered. The book is terribly edited (Crook repeats herself several times, but that should have been cleared up during editing). Still highly recommend and I'm glad that I have it on my shelf!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Meades

    This book is a must-have for anyone who's ever found themselves glancing at their iPhone when they should have been talking to their kids. It's insightful without being preachy. I highly recommend it.

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