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A Plain Account of Christian Perfection

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In the past few hundred years, some great Christian thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries have penned works of literature that continue to influence Christians today. Rediscover the cornerstone of the Christian faith with this classic work from one of the most influential Christian thought leaders.


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In the past few hundred years, some great Christian thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries have penned works of literature that continue to influence Christians today. Rediscover the cornerstone of the Christian faith with this classic work from one of the most influential Christian thought leaders.

30 review for A Plain Account of Christian Perfection

  1. 4 out of 5

    John Barbour

    This is an excellent book that I used as a devotional. It is a compilation of John Wesley's reflections on the subject of entire sanctification from the years 1722-1777. Christian perfection or entire sanctification is loving God with all of your heart soul, mind, and strength and loving your neighbor as yourself. The idea of entire sanctification is in contrast to the idea of total depravity. Even as sin had affected every area of our lives before Christ; so in Christ, God desires us to be sanct This is an excellent book that I used as a devotional. It is a compilation of John Wesley's reflections on the subject of entire sanctification from the years 1722-1777. Christian perfection or entire sanctification is loving God with all of your heart soul, mind, and strength and loving your neighbor as yourself. The idea of entire sanctification is in contrast to the idea of total depravity. Even as sin had affected every area of our lives before Christ; so in Christ, God desires us to be sanctified wholly in spirit, soul, and body- in other words, our entire being. It is being restored to our original condition and purpose. This book is the result of 40 years of thinking and preaching about a subject (perfection) that was dear to Jesus and the Apostles heart but disparaged by so much of Christendom. The same is true today. How many times have you heard it said, “Christians aren’t perfect” but you never hear, “Be perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect” (Jesus) or Aim for perfection” (Paul). I wholly recommend this book but for only those who are seeking to be more like Christ. In answering the question, "in what manner shall we preach sanctification?" Wesley answers, "Scarce at all to those who are not pressing forward; to those who are, always by way of promise; always drawing, rather than driving."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A really good explanation of the much misunderstood concept of Christian Perfection and Entire Sanctification. While most people criticize the ideas, it's hard to argue with Wesley's analysis of growth in love and the holiness it results in. He never argues for sinless perfection, he argues for a life so filled with love that the desire to sin is eclipsed by the love of God.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Conor

    Trying to understand Wesley's view of sanctification more clearly, while connecting it to Luthers view of justification.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Russ

    Methodism teaches that you should strive for perfection. This is a very controversial goal, even among Christians. Whenever a belief is expressed that perfection can be attained in this world, someone immediately shouts down the person who expressed the belief with a trite rejection: "Nobody's perfect." But the important thing to understand before rejecting the concept outright is how Wesley defines perfection. Being perfect means being so full of love for God and humankind that there is no room Methodism teaches that you should strive for perfection. This is a very controversial goal, even among Christians. Whenever a belief is expressed that perfection can be attained in this world, someone immediately shouts down the person who expressed the belief with a trite rejection: "Nobody's perfect." But the important thing to understand before rejecting the concept outright is how Wesley defines perfection. Being perfect means being so full of love for God and humankind that there is no room for sin or hate to creep inside of you. It doesn't mean being infallible. Wesley explains the concept of perfection in this book. He bases his belief on scripture. The Bible does not say that holiness or perfection is attained when the body is separated from the soul upon death. On the contrary, Jesus taught his disciples to pray that God's will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Wesley asks us why Jesus would tell us to pray for an impossibility. If you're a Methodist, this book is a must-read. It will help clarify what Wesley meant and force you to face a different standard than you may have first imagined. It would also help refresh any Christian on what is actually written in the Bible, and not what we have "learned" socially. As a book, this is a lumpy, disorganized text that would have benefited from a merciless editor. Wesley mixes in a bunch of hymns that he and his brother wrote and uses those to explain why his detractors are wrong. I love Wesleyan hymns, but using your own lyrics to defend your point of view is silly. Also, Wesley poses a bunch of questions as subject headings, followed by his answers. But the questions are odd--it's unlikely that a layman would ever ask some of the questions--and Wesley uses them as springboards to explain his thoughts further. Some parts are redundant. Invaluable message; slipshod organization.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

    Wesley lays out his argument for Christian perfection, explaining what it is and what it is not. Responding to critics, he argues it is not an absolute perfection (it does not mean the Christian knows everything God knows). It also does not mean no more growth is possible, the Christian continues to grow in love. Another thing it does not mean is that the Christian no longer relies on grace, actually the Christian who is perfected in love relies on grace more. Simply put then, Christian perfecti Wesley lays out his argument for Christian perfection, explaining what it is and what it is not. Responding to critics, he argues it is not an absolute perfection (it does not mean the Christian knows everything God knows). It also does not mean no more growth is possible, the Christian continues to grow in love. Another thing it does not mean is that the Christian no longer relies on grace, actually the Christian who is perfected in love relies on grace more. Simply put then, Christian perfection is loving God with heart, soul, mind and strength and loving neighbor as self. It is being perfected, being filled with love. His arguments for it are biblical: God commanded it and God would not command something impossible. I did not really like his style of argument as he reported on previous dialogues and such from throughout his life. It was as if I would go through old emails and sermons and copy/paste all points related to a topic. The argument is made and it is a thoughtful read, but it is not as engaging as a fresh paper. Overall, whether one agrees with Wesley or not is secondary. Reading this was inspiring and should move anyone to pursue growth in grace and love of God.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alex Stroshine

    "A Plain Account of Christian Perfection" is not as plain as it would seem. I found John Wesley (whom I greatly admire) to be defensive throughout the book, as opponents of his sharply spoke out against his doctrine of Christian perfection. Just what is Christian perfection exactly? Some have said that Wesley did not believe perfection meant to be without sin but on pg. 125 Wesley writes, "I do not contend for the term sinless, though I do not object against it." There appears to be a lot of qui "A Plain Account of Christian Perfection" is not as plain as it would seem. I found John Wesley (whom I greatly admire) to be defensive throughout the book, as opponents of his sharply spoke out against his doctrine of Christian perfection. Just what is Christian perfection exactly? Some have said that Wesley did not believe perfection meant to be without sin but on pg. 125 Wesley writes, "I do not contend for the term sinless, though I do not object against it." There appears to be a lot of quibbling about semantics. Some have suggested that Wesley instead meant that Christian perfection was a heightened sanctification (knowing that Pentecostalism emerged out of Methodism, I wonder if this "second blessing" had any effect on the Pentecostal belief in the second baptism, the "baptism of the Holy Spirit"?). I am unconvinced by Wesley's defenses (laid out almost like an interview or catechism), but I believe Wesley does do well to encourage us to think of sanctification (something that is lacking, I feel, in evangelical circles). The best parts of this book were Wesley's short, reflections, such as “True humility is a kind of self-annihilation; and this is the centre of all virtues.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

    like the title says, this book lays out the ideas surrounding living in perfection in this life. while the author shies away from the term "sinless living," it's what he means. he does allow that someone who found their way into christian perfection would still be subject to making mistakes. when i first asked my ex-pastor about this idea i was sure there was no such thing. he surprised me and suggested the book. i read it and wesley does make his case. my ex-pastor said that if someone came into like the title says, this book lays out the ideas surrounding living in perfection in this life. while the author shies away from the term "sinless living," it's what he means. he does allow that someone who found their way into christian perfection would still be subject to making mistakes. when i first asked my ex-pastor about this idea i was sure there was no such thing. he surprised me and suggested the book. i read it and wesley does make his case. my ex-pastor said that if someone came into this experience, they probably wouldn't know it, and that for some people seeking after this kind of holiness could become a trap. pretty different from the stuff you see floating around in the christian bookstores nowadays.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    Enjoyed reading John Wesley's own views regarding holiness and sanctification. I'm not clear on whether Wesley held to his views as a second work of grace. I feel he implies this in his work but not as clearly as I would like. This is must reading for Arminians and especially those who are Wesleyans.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Phil

    While I don't agree with everything in this book, I do agree with Wesley's treatment of the main subject matter of "Christian Perfection". I concluded that the main reason people ridicule Wesley's teaching is that they define perfection differently. As Wesley wrote, "[Perfection] ...must be disguised before it can be opposed. It must be covered with a bearskin first..." [page 118] Wesley had several ways of viewing perfection, including "purity of intention, dedicating all the life to God, givin While I don't agree with everything in this book, I do agree with Wesley's treatment of the main subject matter of "Christian Perfection". I concluded that the main reason people ridicule Wesley's teaching is that they define perfection differently. As Wesley wrote, "[Perfection] ...must be disguised before it can be opposed. It must be covered with a bearskin first..." [page 118] Wesley had several ways of viewing perfection, including "purity of intention, dedicating all the life to God, giving God all our heart, loving God with all our heart, and our neighbor as ourselves." [page 117] Indeed, love is the key to Wesley's teaching on perfection. My sense is that those who oppose the teaching of Christian perfection do so because they don't want to relinquish their autonomy by giving their all to God in full submission. The world exerts a strong pull and self often dies a hard death. Wesley understood that. Add to that the fact that the devil uses every personal failure to convict us that perfection is an impossible goal and it's easy to see why so many Christians struggle with the idea of having perfection in this life. One of my favorite questions Wesley asks of those who deny that Christian perfection is attainable in this life is, "Has God anywhere in scripture commanded us more than He has promised to us?" [page 70] Since the content of this book was from the 1700's, the writing style made it a difficult read in places. Much of the content uses a question/answer format and I'm sure Wesley fielded a lot of those questions from those who disagreed with him over the 40 years he preached on perfection.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    It kind of kills me, as a Wesleyan, to give one of JW's prominent works only two stars, but hear me out. This is more of a "Greatest Hits of Perfectionism" compilation than anything else, and to be honest I liked the original albums better. Wesley is in conversation with several overlapping critics of his time (mid-to-late 1700s) and is pulling from his works and the works of people who are in agreement with him or have written letters to him to say that his and his brother's understanding of Ch It kind of kills me, as a Wesleyan, to give one of JW's prominent works only two stars, but hear me out. This is more of a "Greatest Hits of Perfectionism" compilation than anything else, and to be honest I liked the original albums better. Wesley is in conversation with several overlapping critics of his time (mid-to-late 1700s) and is pulling from his works and the works of people who are in agreement with him or have written letters to him to say that his and his brother's understanding of Christian perfection is right so plz leave him alone. It's repetitive, and a bit dull because I don't have the other half of the conversation. That said, there are some great Wesleyisms here (like "humility and patience are the surest proof of the increase of love") and some sick burns ("do not talk much, neither long at a time. Few can converse profitably above an hour"). But this just doesn't have the punch that I found, for instance, in his sermon "On Perfection," which was what convinced me to get on board the Wesleyan perfection train in the first place. I do really appreciate the quoting of hymns, though, as it is such a foundational aspect of Wesleyan theology--and it pulls in Charles, who so often gets lost in his brother's shadow.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Audra Spiven

    This is another textbook read, and for whatever reason, the edition I read isn't represented on Goodreads. The one I chose is the eBook version of the edition I read, so it's the same cover--but I read the paperback. Anyway, this book is a pretty quintessential piece of any discussion of the doctrine(s) of perfection, holiness, and/or sanctification. Sometimes it seems those words are interchangeable and sometimes not. This book was easier to read than I expected it to be, given that I knew it w This is another textbook read, and for whatever reason, the edition I read isn't represented on Goodreads. The one I chose is the eBook version of the edition I read, so it's the same cover--but I read the paperback. Anyway, this book is a pretty quintessential piece of any discussion of the doctrine(s) of perfection, holiness, and/or sanctification. Sometimes it seems those words are interchangeable and sometimes not. This book was easier to read than I expected it to be, given that I knew it was written in 18th-century language. And there were places where I got bogged down or confused, or even just frustrated by John Wesley's puzzling relationship with punctuation. In any case, I think I got the gist of things well enough, and I'm glad I read this book. It's a good one to have in my bookcase and on my finished shelf.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian Hyde

    A classic Christian text on the scriptural foundation for believing that a person can be, through God's grace alone, wholly sanctified in this life. John Wesley, as a practical rather than systematic theologian, discusses the challenge and defense of the doctrine of Christian perfection which he preached for over 40 years and which provides the foundation for the worldwide Wesleyan-Holiness and Methodist movements. I definitely recommend this for anyone who desires a deeper, more fully realized A classic Christian text on the scriptural foundation for believing that a person can be, through God's grace alone, wholly sanctified in this life. John Wesley, as a practical rather than systematic theologian, discusses the challenge and defense of the doctrine of Christian perfection which he preached for over 40 years and which provides the foundation for the worldwide Wesleyan-Holiness and Methodist movements. I definitely recommend this for anyone who desires a deeper, more fully realized relationship with Christ; and for anyone who is interested in the development of Christian theology through the centuries.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bret Walker

    John Wesley gives an excellent and thorough dissertation on the doctrine of Christian perfection as not to be obtained only in the next life but in this as well. He presents with scriptural evidence the possibility of said perfection in loving God with one's whole heart, mind, and being, and makes the case that when one's entire heart is filled with love for God, there can be no room for other worldly things that might steal our affections. For anyone who follows in a Wesleyan tradition this is John Wesley gives an excellent and thorough dissertation on the doctrine of Christian perfection as not to be obtained only in the next life but in this as well. He presents with scriptural evidence the possibility of said perfection in loving God with one's whole heart, mind, and being, and makes the case that when one's entire heart is filled with love for God, there can be no room for other worldly things that might steal our affections. For anyone who follows in a Wesleyan tradition this is highly recommended to read, and for any other Christian I urge to consider the declarations made within.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hether Wright

    This book was fantastic. It was one I'd slightly dreaded reading for class. But once I adjusted to Wesley's style of writing and speaking, it was a wonderful read. He explains well his views of sanctification and is very well studied in scripture as he presents and supports his views. If you are interested in Wesleyan or Methodist theology, I highly recommend this book. I hope to revisit it when I am done with school.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    Enjoyed listening to this as an audiobook. It was a quick book. The parts that I liked the most, which made it be a 3-star rating, were the parts that poems were recited. Other than those, it didn't catch my attention very well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Roche

    I only read this book because of comments made on the White Horse Inn, and I felt the need to read it for myself. IMHO, this book is theological garbage. It does however give insight as to where much of today’s legalism (SJW on the left, and self righteousness on the right) comes from.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ronald J. Pauleus

    John approaches the biblical theme of perfection, that is mentioned throughout the Old & New Testament, with carefulness, simplicity, love and clarity. Any Christian seeking to please God would benefit from reading this scripturally rich book. John approaches the biblical theme of perfection, that is mentioned throughout the Old & New Testament, with carefulness, simplicity, love and clarity. Any Christian seeking to please God would benefit from reading this scripturally rich book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bland Joshua

    A beautiful collection of Wesley’s writings on Christian perfection. I believe that this book should be a standard reading for discipleship and Christian education. It is a text that I plan to return to often and am hopeful to teach in the near future.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gary Reid Haynes

    Doctrine This book will explain Wesley's doctrine of Christian Perfection. This was a eye opener. I still have questions but much less.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tawny

    Struggle city with this one mainly because I don’t agree with his stance on christian perfection, but I appreciate his arguments and views. And I enjoy being challenged.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Twalibangi

    good

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dave Pettengill

    Great book This book while in depth was approachable and helpful in understanding this essential Wesleyan doctrine. I would recommend this too others.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Howard Harris Jr.

    Wesley Theological text that examines the history of Wesleyan theology. I recommend this book to those who are seeking greater understanding of Christian Perfection.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    [A Methodist is one who loves the Lord his God with all his heart, with all his soul, with all his mind, and with all his strength. God is the joy of his heart, and the desire of his soul, which is continually crying, "Whom have I in heaven but Thee? and there is none upon earth whom I desire besides Thee." My God and my all! "Thou art the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever." He is therefore happy in God; yea, always happy; as having in Him a well of water springing up into everlastin [A Methodist is one who loves the Lord his God with all his heart, with all his soul, with all his mind, and with all his strength. God is the joy of his heart, and the desire of his soul, which is continually crying, "Whom have I in heaven but Thee? and there is none upon earth whom I desire besides Thee." My God and my all! "Thou art the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever." He is therefore happy in God; yea, always happy; as having in Him a well of water springing up into everlasting life, and overflowing his soul with peace and joy. Perfect love having now cast out fear, he rejoices evermore. Yea, his joy is full; and all his bones cry out, "Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who, according to His abundant mercy, hath begotten me again unto a living hope of an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled, reserved in heaven for me.]-(pg.11) [Whether in ease or pain, whether in sickness or health, whether in life or death, he giveth thanks from the ground of the heart to Him who orders it for good; into whose hands he hath wholly committed his body and soul, "as into the hands of a faithful Creator.]-(pg.12) ['Agreeable to this, his one desire is the one design of his life, namely, "to do not his own will, but the will of Him that sent him." His one intention at all times and in all places is, not to please Himself, but Him whom his soul loveth. He hath a single eye; and because his "eye is single, his whole body is full of light." The whole is light, as when "the bright shining of a candle doth enlighten the house." God reigns alone: all that is in the soul is holiness to the Lord. There is not a motion in his heart but is according to His will. Every thought that arises points to Him, and is in obedience to the law of Christ. And the tree is known by its fruits. For as he loves God, "so he keeps His commandments": not only some, or most of them, but ALL, from the least to the greatest. He is not content to "keep the whole law, and offend in one point," but has, in all points, "a conscience void of offence, towards God, and towards man." Whatever God has forbidden, he avoids; whatever God has enjoined, he does. "He runs the way of God's commandments," now He hath set his heart at liberty. It is his glory and joy so to do: it is his daily crown of rejoicing, to do the will of God on earth as it is done in heaven. All the commandments of God he accordingly keeps, and that with all his might. For his obedience is in proportion to His love, the source from whence it flows. And therefore loving God with all his heart, he serves Him with all his strength. He continually presents his soul and body a "living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God"; entirely and without reserve, devoting himself, all he has, all he is, to His glory. All the talents he has, he constantly employs according to his Master's will; every power and faculty of his soul, every member of his body. By consequence, "whatsoever he doeth, it is all to the glory of God." In all his employments of every kind, he not only aims at this (which is implied in having a single eye), but actually attains it. His business and his refreshments, as well as his prayers, all serve to this great end. Whether he "sit in the house, or walk by the way," whether he lie down, or rise up, he is promoting, in all he speaks, or does, the one business of his life. Whether he put on his apparel, or labour, or eat and drink, or divert himself from too wasting labour, it all tends to advance the glory of God, by peace and good-will among men. His one invariable rule is this: "Whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God, even the Father, through Him. Nor do customs of the world at all hinder his "running the race which is set before him." He cannot, therefore, "lay up treasures upon earth," no more than he can take fire into his bosom. He cannot speak evil to his neighbour, any more than he can lie either to God or man. He cannot utter an unkind word of anyone; for love keeps the door of his lips. He cannot speak idle words; no corrupt conversation ever comes out of his mouth. as is all that is not good to the use of edifying, not fit to minister grace to the hearers. But "whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are" justly "of good report," he thinks, speaks, and acts, "adorning the doctrine of God our Saviour in all things."]-(pg.13-15) ["This great gift of God, the salvation of our souls, is no other than the image of God fresh stamped on our hearts. It is a "renewal of believers in the spirit of their minds, after the likeness of Him that created them."]-(pg.21-22)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

    This was an intriguing read for me. I read it with an open mind because I hadn't studied this doctrine heavily at all, but when I finished it I was quite confused. I think if Wesley had chosen a word other than “perfection” to describe what he is alluding to, it would be much less of an issue. He never states that some Christians are incapable of making mistakes; in fact, he blatantly states that he does not believe that. But the word “perfection” definitely leaves that impression if not explain This was an intriguing read for me. I read it with an open mind because I hadn't studied this doctrine heavily at all, but when I finished it I was quite confused. I think if Wesley had chosen a word other than “perfection” to describe what he is alluding to, it would be much less of an issue. He never states that some Christians are incapable of making mistakes; in fact, he blatantly states that he does not believe that. But the word “perfection” definitely leaves that impression if not explained fully and thoroughly; even then, sometimes it was confusing. He says that Christians are not infallible but are sinless, only to later say that perfection is not necessarily sinless. I don’t know if he fully understood what he was teaching or if he had fully processed it before he published it. I don’t know what I believe about Wesley’s definition of perfection in Christians, and reading his work didn’t help me form an opinion because I was confused by a few contradictions he made. A life lived in love is pleasing to the Lord, even if mistakes are made in it, because it is a life lived with Him. I think this was Wesley’s main conclusion, and I concur with it wholeheartedly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This is a good read, if only to be able to say that one actually read Wesley. A few thoughts 1) Theology aside, the book is good, albeit a bit repetitive and maybe lacking in a certain type of cohesiveness. I can tell that Wesley had this idea of Christian Perfection, and really wanted to get it across, but something just wasn't getting across; basically the same feeling I get trying to balance the check book. 2) Theologically, I mean, its nice to see someone take sanctification seriously, and I This is a good read, if only to be able to say that one actually read Wesley. A few thoughts 1) Theology aside, the book is good, albeit a bit repetitive and maybe lacking in a certain type of cohesiveness. I can tell that Wesley had this idea of Christian Perfection, and really wanted to get it across, but something just wasn't getting across; basically the same feeling I get trying to balance the check book. 2) Theologically, I mean, its nice to see someone take sanctification seriously, and I don't know if I wholly disagree with him here; although I feel like the "perfection" he seeks happens a lot less than he would like it too, maybe once in a generation, if we're lucky. 3) Even if one disagrees with the notion of Christian perfection, its still a nice read for the overall positive ontology that he presents. It is a good counter to the total depravity that finds its way into other protestant theologies.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    This short polemic was written in the 18th century to counter misconceptions of a key Methodism doctrine. The structure of the book is woven around several smaller arguments that number around 30. Each is defended with biblical references and examples taken from observed ministry. I struggle in the first part of the book in adapting to the literary style, however, my perseverance was rewarded greatly as I found the book taking on more relevancy for me. Wesley's legacy of intensely pursuing Jesus This short polemic was written in the 18th century to counter misconceptions of a key Methodism doctrine. The structure of the book is woven around several smaller arguments that number around 30. Each is defended with biblical references and examples taken from observed ministry. I struggle in the first part of the book in adapting to the literary style, however, my perseverance was rewarded greatly as I found the book taking on more relevancy for me. Wesley's legacy of intensely pursuing Jesus exudes in the pages of this compact work. He is thoroughly practical in much of his counsel (particularly in the latter half of the book). For those desiring to understand a key doctrine of the holiness tradition, or to simply grow in their understanding of spirituality, I recommend you picking up this book and seeing what it has to say to you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    May Ling

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A simple title. But a devotional book that I need to open the Bible to read the context passages that Wesley was referring to. I want to build that habitual Disposition of pursuing Christ with a single minded heart in all seasons. it is heartening to be reminded that "there is no man that sinneth not"(ecc7:20) "For though the righteous fall seven times, they rise again." (Pro 24:16) Even the righteous fall... I press on to possess that perfection for which Christ Jesus first possessed me. Ph3:12 Ca A simple title. But a devotional book that I need to open the Bible to read the context passages that Wesley was referring to. I want to build that habitual Disposition of pursuing Christ with a single minded heart in all seasons. it is heartening to be reminded that "there is no man that sinneth not"(ecc7:20) "For though the righteous fall seven times, they rise again." (Pro 24:16) Even the righteous fall... I press on to possess that perfection for which Christ Jesus first possessed me. Ph3:12 Caution 1 : Beware of pride - Much grace does not imply much light, much love does not imply much light Caution 2 : Beware of Enthusiasm without expecting the means Caution 3 : Beware of making void the Law e.g self indulgence Caution 4 : Beware of Sins of omission Caution 5 : Beware of Desiring anything but God Caution 6 : Beware of Dividing spirit Last advice : Be exemplary in all things

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Kinsfather

    Wesley argues that when a believer is dedicated to following Christ he will cease from sinning. Wesley claims to have attained this pinnacle himself as well as several of his friends. This book is a classic example of ungrace, guilt, and spiritual elitism. It offers no hope for those struggling in sin. The implication is that you have failed as a Christian is sin is still present in your life in any way. The Apostle John is clear that John Wesley is lying when he claims to be sinlessly perfect.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Whitley

    Wesley was a great man, who accomplished great things for the Kingdom of God. I admire Wesley's passion for holiness. However, his passion for holiness led him in a wrong direction. This is anything but a "plain" account of anything. Wesley is pretty ambiguous on his position of Christian perfection. I believe Wesley's definition of sin is weak, and it led him to believe that one could be "wholly" perfect. He avoids saying that one could be "sinless" but at times he alludes to such ideals. Unfor Wesley was a great man, who accomplished great things for the Kingdom of God. I admire Wesley's passion for holiness. However, his passion for holiness led him in a wrong direction. This is anything but a "plain" account of anything. Wesley is pretty ambiguous on his position of Christian perfection. I believe Wesley's definition of sin is weak, and it led him to believe that one could be "wholly" perfect. He avoids saying that one could be "sinless" but at times he alludes to such ideals. Unfortunately this book does not help Wesley or his follower's cause.

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