Hot Best Seller

The Witches' Book of the Dead

Availability: Ready to download

Witches are creatures of magic. They cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. What you might not know is that Witches can also commune with the spirits of the dead. In The Witches' Book of the Dead, modernday Salem Warlock Christian Day shows how the spirits of our beloved dead can be summoned to perform such tasks as helping you to discover hidden opportunities, influen Witches are creatures of magic. They cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. What you might not know is that Witches can also commune with the spirits of the dead. In The Witches' Book of the Dead, modernday Salem Warlock Christian Day shows how the spirits of our beloved dead can be summoned to perform such tasks as helping you to discover hidden opportunities, influence the minds of others, seduce the object of your affection, and even reach into the dreams of the unwary. According to legend, the Spirits of the dead can confer magical talents, fame, love, and wealth on those brave enough to summon them. The Witches' Book of the Dead explores the enduring relationship between witches and the dead and teaches rituals and incantations to help readers open doorways to the spirit world. Topics include: Legendary Witches who have raised the dead, including The Witch of Endor, Circe, and Erichtho Creating ancestral altars and building relationships with spirits The tools of Necromancy: the bronze dagger, yew wand, iron keys, graveyard dust, the offering cauldron, spirit powders, the human skull, and more Methods of spirit contact, including automatic writing, scrying mirrors, spirit boards, pendulums, and spirit mediumship The ancient arts of necromancy as a method of conjuring the dead to assist in magic Ridding yourself of unwanted spirits using rituals of cleansing, banishing and exorcism Ghost hunting techniques that combine psychic wisdom with modern technology Communing with the dead in dreams Sacred holidays and powerful celebrations of the dead Resources on where to ethically obtain the tools of the trade An overview of the feared deities of the Underworld Rituals, recipes, exercises, and more! Dare to walk between the worlds with Christian Day as he guides you across the River Styx into the shadowy realms where the dead long to connect with us once more!


Compare

Witches are creatures of magic. They cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. What you might not know is that Witches can also commune with the spirits of the dead. In The Witches' Book of the Dead, modernday Salem Warlock Christian Day shows how the spirits of our beloved dead can be summoned to perform such tasks as helping you to discover hidden opportunities, influen Witches are creatures of magic. They cast spells, heal, and foretell the future. What you might not know is that Witches can also commune with the spirits of the dead. In The Witches' Book of the Dead, modernday Salem Warlock Christian Day shows how the spirits of our beloved dead can be summoned to perform such tasks as helping you to discover hidden opportunities, influence the minds of others, seduce the object of your affection, and even reach into the dreams of the unwary. According to legend, the Spirits of the dead can confer magical talents, fame, love, and wealth on those brave enough to summon them. The Witches' Book of the Dead explores the enduring relationship between witches and the dead and teaches rituals and incantations to help readers open doorways to the spirit world. Topics include: Legendary Witches who have raised the dead, including The Witch of Endor, Circe, and Erichtho Creating ancestral altars and building relationships with spirits The tools of Necromancy: the bronze dagger, yew wand, iron keys, graveyard dust, the offering cauldron, spirit powders, the human skull, and more Methods of spirit contact, including automatic writing, scrying mirrors, spirit boards, pendulums, and spirit mediumship The ancient arts of necromancy as a method of conjuring the dead to assist in magic Ridding yourself of unwanted spirits using rituals of cleansing, banishing and exorcism Ghost hunting techniques that combine psychic wisdom with modern technology Communing with the dead in dreams Sacred holidays and powerful celebrations of the dead Resources on where to ethically obtain the tools of the trade An overview of the feared deities of the Underworld Rituals, recipes, exercises, and more! Dare to walk between the worlds with Christian Day as he guides you across the River Styx into the shadowy realms where the dead long to connect with us once more!

30 review for The Witches' Book of the Dead

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I originally picked up Christian's book because of some bad and (in my opinion) ill-informed reviews. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. As I read the book, I was floored. First, it was an easy read. Reading the book was like listening to Christian speak. His personality really came through. I didn't feel talked down to and I didn't get lost while reading. The history presented in the book was addressed in such a way that I felt I learned a lot but wasn't lectured. I also enjoyed the p I originally picked up Christian's book because of some bad and (in my opinion) ill-informed reviews. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about. As I read the book, I was floored. First, it was an easy read. Reading the book was like listening to Christian speak. His personality really came through. I didn't feel talked down to and I didn't get lost while reading. The history presented in the book was addressed in such a way that I felt I learned a lot but wasn't lectured. I also enjoyed the personal stories and experiences. I think this brought the topic into the real world and helped me understand it's application. Necromancy is something that is severely stigmatized and through reading this book I have found that it is not nearly as scary (even if we should use a skull!) as I once thought. I am still a Novice and do not plan on practicing necromancy anytime soon because I am not as experienced as I feel I need to be. However, when the time comes, I plan on revisiting this book and following Christians advice. Unlike some reviews I read, I felt like Christian approaches necromancy from a very respectful stand point. He doesn't sugar coat what necromancy is and is not afraid to tell it like it is. Yes, as a necromancer you will ask spirits to do things for you but you're not shackling them into slavery. There is definitely a large element of respect when asking spirits to do things for you. A relationship must be developed and maintained. At no point did I get the impression that spirits are treated as beings without a face or story. I actually gathered the opposite. I felt as if Christian was saying you should work with familiar spirits you feel comfortable with. As for Christian's "ego" (which has been addressed in other reviews), I feel like it comes through in this book but not in a stuck up way. The voice behind the book is that of confidence and experience. I felt like the "name dropping" he does solidify's his place in the community and (when it comes to spirits) shows his reverence for his beloved dead. All in all this book is invaluable for someone that would like to practice necromancy now or in the future. I feel like I am not bias, seeing as I do not know Christian personally, and I am not involved in the greater witch community. Politics and personal practice aside, this book is a home-run.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashtoreth Eldritch

    I have some problems with this book, overall, and will just use bullet points to discuss them. •The Amazon Kindle sample is the foreword and first chapter. I purchased the book based on this sample. After reading the book in its entirety, I would not have purchased it if any of the other chapters (save chapter 13) had been chosen as the representative sample. •Whilst there are some references and notes included in the text, most of them are given for topics that a well versed occultist should alr I have some problems with this book, overall, and will just use bullet points to discuss them. •The Amazon Kindle sample is the foreword and first chapter. I purchased the book based on this sample. After reading the book in its entirety, I would not have purchased it if any of the other chapters (save chapter 13) had been chosen as the representative sample. •Whilst there are some references and notes included in the text, most of them are given for topics that a well versed occultist should already be familiar with if they are reading a book discussing necromancy. Other ideas (for example, using only Kosher salt for some workings and not using salt for others) have no notes or references which leads me to think it is a case of doing things that way 'because I was taught that way'. Fair enough, but I want to know the why behind the reasoning, and it is not given. •Name dropping. There is not a chapter in this book (save Chapter 13) that is spared heavy doses of name dropping and pedigree displays. That information is best put in end notes. I'd be happy to read "My friend and mentor (name)(note number)..." instead of "My friend and mentor (name) owner of (shop) founder of (tradition/coven) and organiser of (Salem, MA event)" every single time Day mentions them. I want to read a book on necromancy, not an advertisement for the Salem witches and their stores. The worst offender is Chapter Twelve which is dedicated to ghost hunting. •Which feeds into the contradictions that run rife through this book. As an example, according to Day, altars for the dead should be discreet, tasteful, and inconspicuous whilst being the main focal point, prominent, and as interesting as you can make them. This contradictory vein runs throughout all topics he discusses, which may be his attempt at finding the middle ground between extremes. If so, he needs to work harder at presenting that middle path in a way that doesn't make the reader feel like a yo-yo being yanked from left to right with each turn of the page. •The author photograph. I honestly laughed out loud and was in danger of choking on my tea. Back in the day when Aleister Crowley posed in his portraits, it was for shock value and it worked. A century later, it does not work so well. The pose and props just screamed out as clichéd reminding me more of a Scooby-Doo cartoon character than as an author presenting a serious work on necromancy. Getting past those issues, however, there is some valuable material presented in the book, in particular, the last chapter entitled A Festival of the Dead. This is the best written chapter in the book and the one I enjoyed (almost) without reservation. The overviews of global celebrations of the dead was presented in a scholarly and entertaining manner that encourages further personal exploration of these customs if so desired. It also discusses events that occur in Salem, MA lightly enough to pique the reader's curiosity instead of clubbing it into their brain as in previous chapters. I also enjoyed the examples of group celebratory rites shared and came away with some exciting ideas to adapt for my own familial celebrations. That said, I did have a quibble about the rites as written, but not specific to Day and instead aimed at Wicca-craft in general. Bad rhyming. It is a plague that makes all practitioners of the arcane arts sound like drop-outs from the Dr Seuss School of Spell Craft. I also have a problem with the insistence of using coloured candles, but those are subjects for another post. Overall, would I call this a 'must have book' or 'one of the most in depth works on darker magic'1? No. Not as it stands. With some determined editing and revisions, it could be a book I would recommend. For now, it stands as a nice introduction to chthonic rites and as a book that can give you ideas on bringing these aspects into daily thought. For serious exploration of necromancy and working with other spirits, I would recommend Jake Stratton-Kent's works, specifically Geosophia - The Argo of Magic and The True Grimoire, both published by Scarlet Imprint. 1. Quotes from the advertising blurbs at the front of the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cazangelcat

    This books is one of the best guides for those witch's who are ready to contact the dead. Necromancy can be a quite "controversial" topic for some Wiccans/Witches. However Christian Day's guide is the best I have ever read. Thanks to reading this book not very long after it was released, I bought it as an ebook and have since read it three times and refer to it constantly. I would recommend this book to any pagan/wiccan or witch. It is brilliantly written concisely, with much wisdom and written This books is one of the best guides for those witch's who are ready to contact the dead. Necromancy can be a quite "controversial" topic for some Wiccans/Witches. However Christian Day's guide is the best I have ever read. Thanks to reading this book not very long after it was released, I bought it as an ebook and have since read it three times and refer to it constantly. I would recommend this book to any pagan/wiccan or witch. It is brilliantly written concisely, with much wisdom and written in a very easy to follow format. For those who want to learn more? Christian Day and the "infamous Stregha" Lori Bruno have the best Witches Podcast Ever called "Hex Education" direct from Salem, MA. It's a fantastic podcast. Not only is it entertaining and educational, but also "inspirational". Thankyou Christian for writing this book as it has changed my life! You are the BEST!!! Blessed Be to All )O(

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shayla

    There isn’t a part of this book that I don’t like. It was one of the best books I read in 2012. It was written to include a nice spectrum of working with the Dead, spirits. I especially loved his altar of the Dead. Opening up the book you have some real good info on the Dead, practices, and witchcraft and then you come to your first exercise: Entering the Visionary State. Simple and easy to do connection with the Death current. It’s one that is perfect for you before you start your Necromantic wo There isn’t a part of this book that I don’t like. It was one of the best books I read in 2012. It was written to include a nice spectrum of working with the Dead, spirits. I especially loved his altar of the Dead. Opening up the book you have some real good info on the Dead, practices, and witchcraft and then you come to your first exercise: Entering the Visionary State. Simple and easy to do connection with the Death current. It’s one that is perfect for you before you start your Necromantic workings, to help loosen you up a bit before you jump head first into the waters. If you want to modify it, you can very easily. Even the Making the Pact Ritual, I found useful and I normally bypass those. It serves as a purpose to remind you of a commitment you made to better yourself through your workings and your dedication to your craft. The altar of the Dead chapter is very detailed in giving you: understanding of the purpose of the altar of the Dead, finding an altar, placement, blessings, personalization, offerings, daily devotionals and etc. Very lovely chapter if you ask me. The ritual tools are listed, some old and some new. A well placed chapter on bindings and banishing and exorcisms is always needed when working with these energies, lest you have something nasty attached to you. The cleansing ritual are useful and you can, of course, replace the Saint Michael with Hecate, Satan or any other deity you chose. There’s a good method on spirit communication and mediumship. With all the ritual exercises, Necromantic works in different cultures, and workings on a daily basis with the spirits, this book has so much to offer. The book ends with Dreams of the Dead, ghost haunting how to’s, the 9 day fear of the Dead, other cultures festivities of the Dead, Samhain, the ritual dumb supper and a nice “after thought”. A book for every practicioner to have in their library.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Letitia

    I am so glad I read this book! Christian intelligently shoots down the myths and stigma associated with necromancy, and introduces the reader to the path of working with the dead. While I don't yet feel I am ready for this path yet, Book of the Dead has certainly stirred my interest, and this is something I will likely come back to in the future. Even if necromancy doesn't really appeal, this is still an interesting read and a well written and researched study.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    I have mixed feelings about this book, but I want to be clear first that I liked it and thought it had good worthwhile content in it. First the bad. 1. There is a historical intro to this work that while interesting could have been better left out of the work. I think many novice writers make this mistake and it's not dire, but it can be tedious. 2. Day has some great content to his work but sometimes the writing meanders and is sometimes over precious. I would think that this book would have been I have mixed feelings about this book, but I want to be clear first that I liked it and thought it had good worthwhile content in it. First the bad. 1. There is a historical intro to this work that while interesting could have been better left out of the work. I think many novice writers make this mistake and it's not dire, but it can be tedious. 2. Day has some great content to his work but sometimes the writing meanders and is sometimes over precious. I would think that this book would have been better done with judicious editing and maybe a ghost writer. (This was not meant a slam but just my own opinion.) 3. There is a part where Day Mentions being on a TV show with Penn and Teller and was tested with an Ouija Board he helped create. The Ouija Board Reading was a failure on the show and in the book Day claims it was a success, this is disingenuous and false. Now, this does not slant my opinion against Ouija boards and I am fond of them, but the truth should be told. 4. I think at many times if the work would have gotten to the point of the topic of the book, the author would have improved the work. The Good, Days writing while not polished does contain good advice and information and the rituals are solid. I enjoy much of this despite having to skip ahead when it rambles unnecessarily. I would purchase this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angela Holtz

    From Lilac Wolf and Stuff I started this book with all sorts of misconceptions. Christian Day - and this is no secret to him - is kind of out there on the fringe. He is testing limits, making people uncomfortable. Nothing he does would be considered "normal." There's a skull on the cover - and I learned this guy has a name, Robert. And in his author picture he is holding Robert and an Anubis rattle. Once I got through the first chapter my mind was blown away. The forward was written by Raven Grima From Lilac Wolf and Stuff I started this book with all sorts of misconceptions. Christian Day - and this is no secret to him - is kind of out there on the fringe. He is testing limits, making people uncomfortable. Nothing he does would be considered "normal." There's a skull on the cover - and I learned this guy has a name, Robert. And in his author picture he is holding Robert and an Anubis rattle. Once I got through the first chapter my mind was blown away. The forward was written by Raven Grimassi, another well known witch author. And the respect he has for Christian was impressive. As for the book, it is full to bursting with rituals, information and stories. There are 6 pages for the bibliography and a few more for notes. There's even an index and an appendix. Appendix A has recipes for Spirit Powder, Necromancy Incense, Anointing Oil, and Food for the Dead. Appendix B lists several "Deities of the Dead." And Appendix C lists several resources to find the needed items to perform any of the rituals in the book. The writing itself was entertaining and insightful. Even if you have no hint of desire to explore necromancy, you could still enjoy this book. I was fascinated by the rituals and the anecdotal evidence throughout the book, but the myths he scattered through as background gripped me. Christian Day gets kudos for being a great author as well as informed. I swear I love this guy now! This is a very serious book. It is light reading for some parts, but Christian doesn't hold back on the warnings. These rituals are serious and dealing with the dead is extremely serious. He tells you things you need, but follows them with fair warning. Like obtaining a skull, he gives you a website where you can obtain skulls legally and reminds readers that desecrating graves is illegal and will land you in jail. There is call for blood offerings (only ever a few drops), but over and over and over again he tells readers to use a clean lancet from the drugstore. And also when working in groups to avoid the blood all together. There is balance within these pages. He takes the free-love hippie out of Wicca and brings back a bit of the witchcraft and necromancy (divination through communication with the dead) of old, along with a healthy dose of common sense. Next thing I am doing with this book is reading it again. Sorry you are going to have to get your own (it is available as an eBook).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eilfie Music

    I found this both an informative and entertaining book. I had heard and seen interviews of Christian Day before and had even been to his shop HEX in Salem, Mass. a couple years ago. I found the shop lovely and really had many of the things I needed, but had little time to explore. This book on the dead from a witchcraft perspective was well put together and made me even more excited to return to Salem someday. I saw that it had great potential when it explained first how to banish and clear bef I found this both an informative and entertaining book. I had heard and seen interviews of Christian Day before and had even been to his shop HEX in Salem, Mass. a couple years ago. I found the shop lovely and really had many of the things I needed, but had little time to explore. This book on the dead from a witchcraft perspective was well put together and made me even more excited to return to Salem someday. I saw that it had great potential when it explained first how to banish and clear before calling in or invoking. What is the point in learning how to open the door if you don't know how to close it first. He doesn't try to scare people, but he does give fare warning that some devices or even this whole book might not be for everyone. Even though this book did have beginner level information, which was to mainly help set the stage, this book felt more advance especially when dealing with the subject. I would recommend this work for anyone interested in spirit communication to help find methods they haven't tried yet.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    For all the controversy Christian Day seems to garner, I sometimes wonder if people even read his book or listen to what he says about the occult, because he's actually well informed, whether you agree with him or not on the occult, you cannot say he's misinformed. This book is well researched and quite good. With something that could potentially cut corners, this is a really good starter book if you're into learning about necromancy on an actual magickal level or if you just are wonder wtf work For all the controversy Christian Day seems to garner, I sometimes wonder if people even read his book or listen to what he says about the occult, because he's actually well informed, whether you agree with him or not on the occult, you cannot say he's misinformed. This book is well researched and quite good. With something that could potentially cut corners, this is a really good starter book if you're into learning about necromancy on an actual magickal level or if you just are wonder wtf working with the dead is as a niche level of interest. Christian Day can be considered problematic on certain levels, but I always enjoy reading or hearing him out on his pod cast. You know where he stands on most topics, which is something I like about him, and why I liked this book. I hope he writes more...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Stonegulch

    Okay for complete beginners but experienced practitioners will find little benefit. The author did seem very keen on plugging his shop and businesses belonging to his social circle which I found a bit annoying. If you are scared of ghosts or similar things our society calls 'spooky' then this book will probably help you to see the spirits of the dead in a more positive and friendly light, it is far better suited to that purpose than use as a ritual workbook. Be warned that the mythology from vario Okay for complete beginners but experienced practitioners will find little benefit. The author did seem very keen on plugging his shop and businesses belonging to his social circle which I found a bit annoying. If you are scared of ghosts or similar things our society calls 'spooky' then this book will probably help you to see the spirits of the dead in a more positive and friendly light, it is far better suited to that purpose than use as a ritual workbook. Be warned that the mythology from various ancient cultures has been horribly mangled. The author has the all too common Neo-Wiccan tendency to conflate gods that are utterly disimilar to each other, as well as misrepresent the natures and characteristics of said gods and goddesses. I strongly advise anyone intrigued by ancient lore to read the work of a reliable historian to uncover the truth.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    A good solid foundation for necromancy, but too many simple errors to ignore (like that Kosher salt is made from the earth where bodies are buried?? where would you even get an idea like that??), also a lot of the ableism and veiled neo-Wiccan notions that are common to a lot of witchcraft books. Also the name-dropping got to be a little tiresome after a point. So, it's a nice introductory book, but definitely don't make it the ONLY book you read, and definitely take everything in with an extrem A good solid foundation for necromancy, but too many simple errors to ignore (like that Kosher salt is made from the earth where bodies are buried?? where would you even get an idea like that??), also a lot of the ableism and veiled neo-Wiccan notions that are common to a lot of witchcraft books. Also the name-dropping got to be a little tiresome after a point. So, it's a nice introductory book, but definitely don't make it the ONLY book you read, and definitely take everything in with an extremely large block of salt (but maybe not Kosher salt.....)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Absolutely brilliant! Christian Day is a foremost authority on witchcraft. This book is thoroughly researched, thoughtfully crafted and brimming with truly interesting insight into his own background and practices as a warlock.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Debbie~

    absolutely positive. great information and insight. well written and understsndable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    LaRaine P

    third time reading and I learn more everytime. this a very informative book should have prerequisites for thoose who seriously want to learn.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michaelle

    This was a pretty good book, not sure I'm ready for some of this yet but I will keep it in my library for when I am.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anda

    This is a good reference but not did not really explain itself well. It took me a long time to get through a lot of the listed information.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Love him or loath him he's still here! ;) #Hex Education #Winning

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Toupin

    Just wow. Christian Day definitely does not conform to most other modern day Pagan reads. I recommend this book to those experienced in the craft, definitely not something to pick up for a first dive.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I appreciated his approach to ritual and Wicca. He looks at magic not merely from a love an herbal tea perspective but as something that connects to life in its dark/light and life/death. A book I would like to come back to at some point.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alan D.D.

    Although interesting, I found the book to centric in the fact of working with skulls and bones, preferably human. Some of the tips, spells, rituals, and concepts are interesting, but I expected something more in-depth and not so repetitive.

  21. 5 out of 5

    LotusBlade

    A must-read text for practitioners of death magic and those wishing to further their necromantic education.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nancy McQueen

    Went into it not knowing what to expect. The book was a little branded, but I found the subject on the whole to be interesting.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Most Excellent, I am hoping for more books by this author, although I will skip Mr Grimassi, I read his ( Ravens) description of a Witches ball, I wonder if he quite knew what it was,

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robin Graber

    Interesting read and some good information. But also seemed like he wanted to write a biography instead.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Raven Black

    I find anything Raven Grimassi has written is really excellent material to read, digest, and understand. Brilliant!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patick Kyteler

    There is something magical about receiving a package marked with HEX: OLD WORLD WITCHERY SALEM, MA as the sender. I can't imagine what my mail man must have thought. LOL! Anyhow, upon opening the padded envelope I was pleased to discover the signed copy of Christian Day's WITCHES' BOOK OF THE DEAD carefully wrapped in scarlet tissue paper (btw nice touch), and eerily staring up at me was Robert the skull. The first six pages contain rave reviews by a plethora of authors that reads like a who's-wh There is something magical about receiving a package marked with HEX: OLD WORLD WITCHERY SALEM, MA as the sender. I can't imagine what my mail man must have thought. LOL! Anyhow, upon opening the padded envelope I was pleased to discover the signed copy of Christian Day's WITCHES' BOOK OF THE DEAD carefully wrapped in scarlet tissue paper (btw nice touch), and eerily staring up at me was Robert the skull. The first six pages contain rave reviews by a plethora of authors that reads like a who's-who of the Occult. Instantly I knew THIS BOOK was not going to be the typical rehashed mediumship/channeling usually fostered off on magical folk by New Age publishers. Necromancy, communion with the dead through ritual means for divination and spell-craft, has almost become a dirty word in some witchcraft social circles because it brings up horrific images created by Hollywood of destructive poltergeist activity, painful possessions and mindless zombies created through grisly Voodoo ceremonies. On more than one occasion I've been warned against seeking spectral advice by well meaning Craft practitioners. But is this viewpoint accurate of the witch and the historical role she has served in her community? Turns out it isn't. Through careful, well documented research Christian Day describes the true nature of The Witch: a supernatural creature oftentimes despised by the state but still sought out in the dark of the night by desperate individuals for a variety of magical services including the conjuring forth of spirits. To back up this claim legendary practitioners are profiled with admirable devotion from the Witch of Endor to Circe, Thorbjorg, and the terrifying hag Erichtho who prowled battlefields for fresh corpses to drag home for her "work". Thirteen chapters give a broad yet complete description of the Necromantic Arts. Exercises, tools and rites are profiled throughout the grimoire so don't think this is just a book on magical history and theory (the final Halloween rite in chapter thirteen has got to be one of the most beautiful that I've read to date). I must admit that I do balk at the idea of buying a human skill, but the author does offer alternatives like one made of quartz crystal (which is both cheaper and less ghoulish). I also would have liked more detail and material in the chapter on banishing and exorcism as a rite for those suffering under possession (i.e. person not place) without all of the Catholic trappings is sorely needed by modern pellars. Of course, the rite of exorcism is advanced work so that may be why he left it out. All-in-all The Witches' Book of the Dead is an excellent grimoire. There really isn't anything like it that I've read so far. I do advise purchasing it with another book on protective magic (Dion Fortune's Psychic Self-Defense or Ellen Dugan's Practical Protection Magick both come to mind) just to be sure to have your bases covered.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sugar Cyanide

    Despite Christian's fairly controversial personality and lime light tenancies he writes a very good book. None existent is the flowery language that is lacking in substance that one comes to expect in many Pagan or Witchy publications. This book is well written in a clear concise manner and well researched with a very detailed source appendix. I have yet to come across a book on similar subject matter that has been written in such an academic manner. This alone add great credibility to an ordina Despite Christian's fairly controversial personality and lime light tenancies he writes a very good book. None existent is the flowery language that is lacking in substance that one comes to expect in many Pagan or Witchy publications. This book is well written in a clear concise manner and well researched with a very detailed source appendix. I have yet to come across a book on similar subject matter that has been written in such an academic manner. This alone add great credibility to an ordinarily less than credible field. Christian has raised the bar when it come to writing Witch books sadly his writing shall be over shadowed by his attention seeking ways.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    This book doesn't know what it wants to be. There's some interesting history and mythology here, but the book jumps around from that to the practical stuff and other things. The practical exercises seem to be more about Day wanting to seem spooky than anything else. Also, the book is (dis)ableist, in that usual way where people think those of us with illnesses or impairments aren't good enough to do magic. The best thing about the book is the (mostly Greek) history and myth, though, which is sur This book doesn't know what it wants to be. There's some interesting history and mythology here, but the book jumps around from that to the practical stuff and other things. The practical exercises seem to be more about Day wanting to seem spooky than anything else. Also, the book is (dis)ableist, in that usual way where people think those of us with illnesses or impairments aren't good enough to do magic. The best thing about the book is the (mostly Greek) history and myth, though, which is surprisingly interesting, and possibly worth getting the book for.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Despite the rumors about the author, this was a fantastic book that I will undoubtedly be referencing repeatedly for my work with the dead.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Annie Carey

    this book was one of the worst books I have ever read. It makes no logic points. It was a waste of my time.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.