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The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History

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In 1978, when Michael Hart's controversial book The 100 was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that i In 1978, when Michael Hart's controversial book The 100 was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that in the intervening years the influence of some of his original selections had grown or lessened and that new names loomed large on the world stage. Thus, the publications of this revised and updated edition of The 100. As before, Hart's yardstick is influence: not the greatest people, but the most influential, the people who swayed the destinies of millions of human beings, determined the rise and fall of civilizations, changed the course of history. With incisive biographies, Hart describes their careers and contributions. Explaining his ratings, he presents a new perspective on history, gathering together the vital facts about the world's greatest religious and political leaders, inventors, writers, philosophers, explorers, artists, and innovators--from Asoka to Zoroaster. Most of the biographies are accompanied by photographs or sketches. Hart's selections may be surprising to some. Neither Jesus nor Marx, but Muhammad, is designated as the most influential person in human history. The writer's arguments may challenge and perhaps convince readers, but whether or not they agree with him, his manner of ranking is both informative and entertaining. The 100, revised and updated, is truly a monumental work. It promises to be just as controversial, just as thought-provoking, and just as successful as its predecessor--a perfect addition to any history or philosophy reference section.


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In 1978, when Michael Hart's controversial book The 100 was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that i In 1978, when Michael Hart's controversial book The 100 was first published, critics objected that Hart had the nerve not only to select who he thought were the most influential people in history, but also to rank them according to their importance. Needless to say, the critics were wrong, and to date more than 60,000 copies of the book have been sold. Hart believed that in the intervening years the influence of some of his original selections had grown or lessened and that new names loomed large on the world stage. Thus, the publications of this revised and updated edition of The 100. As before, Hart's yardstick is influence: not the greatest people, but the most influential, the people who swayed the destinies of millions of human beings, determined the rise and fall of civilizations, changed the course of history. With incisive biographies, Hart describes their careers and contributions. Explaining his ratings, he presents a new perspective on history, gathering together the vital facts about the world's greatest religious and political leaders, inventors, writers, philosophers, explorers, artists, and innovators--from Asoka to Zoroaster. Most of the biographies are accompanied by photographs or sketches. Hart's selections may be surprising to some. Neither Jesus nor Marx, but Muhammad, is designated as the most influential person in human history. The writer's arguments may challenge and perhaps convince readers, but whether or not they agree with him, his manner of ranking is both informative and entertaining. The 100, revised and updated, is truly a monumental work. It promises to be just as controversial, just as thought-provoking, and just as successful as its predecessor--a perfect addition to any history or philosophy reference section.

30 review for The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Abeer

    This book is so worth reading. i read it over time. taking 3-4 persons aweek as it has so many names-which a lot of them was new to me- . it made me know about people i never knew about and those guys were REALLY important for our development nowadays. what really made me so happy that there were two arabs in the list "Muhammed PBUH ranked 1st/Umr Ibn Al-khatab ranked 52nd". the bad thing about this book it may get a little boring having a lot of details of scientific things that i dont get and l This book is so worth reading. i read it over time. taking 3-4 persons aweek as it has so many names-which a lot of them was new to me- . it made me know about people i never knew about and those guys were REALLY important for our development nowadays. what really made me so happy that there were two arabs in the list "Muhammed PBUH ranked 1st/Umr Ibn Al-khatab ranked 52nd". the bad thing about this book it may get a little boring having a lot of details of scientific things that i dont get and less about the person's own life-which you really want to know about- another thing made me read this book on several months that it was about INFLUENTIAL persons not FAMOUS. so there were a lot of them weren't familiar to me and that makes you not very interesting in knowing who is next :/ does that make sense to you :D . but that is what is reading all about KNOWING NEW STUFF. In general it was a good book. I rated it not in every single information presenting in there but for the effort the author put to write such an encyclopedia may i say. he obviously studied those characters for long time, analysed their achievements and compared them to each other. another thing i'd give a thumb up is that the author explained why he ranked this person in that ranking. in the end of the book he mentioned a couple of famous persons explaining why he hadn't put them in his ranking. Leonardo Da Vinci wasn't on the list #Disappointing. you aren't obligate to this list but it can help you make yours ;). last but not least what really thrilled me he ranked Menes in his list "ranked 96th". he is an EGYPTIAN pharaoh who is also named Narmer. #proud# If you wanna know a little bit about influential people who made our world as we know now, definitely check that book out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rowena

    I am really surprised to see that one of the hottest discussions about this book is on Hart's religion since he listed Mohammed as the most influential people in the world. As for me, I don't think I would care less about his religion. I think, his reasonings are more important than his original religion. He listed Mohammed first because he had influences on political and economic aspects of his people as well as the Middle Eastern people at that time. Meanwhile Jesus, I suppose as Christian mys I am really surprised to see that one of the hottest discussions about this book is on Hart's religion since he listed Mohammed as the most influential people in the world. As for me, I don't think I would care less about his religion. I think, his reasonings are more important than his original religion. He listed Mohammed first because he had influences on political and economic aspects of his people as well as the Middle Eastern people at that time. Meanwhile Jesus, I suppose as Christian myself, only influenced the political aspect and of course religious life of his people. So even as a Christian, I would agree with Hart, putting Mohammed as the most influential people in the world. My personal opinion is that St. Paul made Jesus more important in this world than His own life story. I am so sorry if my review would angry other Christians, but I honestly think so.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Djayawarman Alamprabu

    My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the world's most influential persons may surprise some readers and may be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular level." -- Michael H. Hart

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alanoud

    I was so curious to read this book done by Dr. Michael after I heard that he ranked prophet Mohammad (PBUH) as the most influential person ever in human history "NO WONDERMENT". once I finished the book I read some opinions of non-Muslims , to say the truth it was nice to see how a lot of people changed their thoughts and judgment about the prophet after reading this book, although I bet a non-small number still disagree and argue about it I would say the book is more likely to be an educational I was so curious to read this book done by Dr. Michael after I heard that he ranked prophet Mohammad (PBUH) as the most influential person ever in human history "NO WONDERMENT". once I finished the book I read some opinions of non-Muslims , to say the truth it was nice to see how a lot of people changed their thoughts and judgment about the prophet after reading this book, although I bet a non-small number still disagree and argue about it I would say the book is more likely to be an educational book; it's full of valuable information. It includes 98 men and 2 women most of them are scientists, inventors, politicians and philosophers. One thing didn't make sense to me is; the author's ranking of Beethoven who was at no.42 and ranking other important inventors at lower ranks!! What I didn't like about this book is that there are some unnecessary ((in my opinion)) elaborations in some scientific theories.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nariman

    I have read this book about six years ago, but I still remember the feeling of excitement associated with reading it. I kept it with me for a long while & read sections of it several times. I am not going to explain what the book is about, I think it is obvious from its title. What is not obvious though is the tremendous effort the author put in his work, which shows in two aspects: The first_is normally in collecting the data and presenting the information, Where the author showed profound knowl I have read this book about six years ago, but I still remember the feeling of excitement associated with reading it. I kept it with me for a long while & read sections of it several times. I am not going to explain what the book is about, I think it is obvious from its title. What is not obvious though is the tremendous effort the author put in his work, which shows in two aspects: The first_is normally in collecting the data and presenting the information, Where the author showed profound knowledge & understanding for historical events, and for cultural, scientific & other subjects.The second_is in the comparison he made based on research, study and analysis. I liked how convincing he was in arguing the order he finally chose for the hundred. What's great about this book (and especially for a teenager) is that it introduces the reader not only to iconic figures, but also to worlds of possibilities. It is after all a hundred success stories regarding all life's aspects.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Siam Talukdar

    This book was better than I expected.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rao Javed

    This might be worth noticing that this book is about the most influenced people of history NOT about the most famous! Influence is often blend with famous because it seem that it might impart about the people who are well known but as a matter of fact their might be countless people that we don’t know yet we are influenced by them like “Ts’al lun” the man who made the paper, like “Johannn” the man who made the printed of paper and many more who have contributed in the era of human civilization. D This might be worth noticing that this book is about the most influenced people of history NOT about the most famous! Influence is often blend with famous because it seem that it might impart about the people who are well known but as a matter of fact their might be countless people that we don’t know yet we are influenced by them like “Ts’al lun” the man who made the paper, like “Johannn” the man who made the printed of paper and many more who have contributed in the era of human civilization. Due to this reason it might be slight deceptive and bewildering. One other reason because of which it might baffle that either it is the person whose thought, wisdom or creation is still in process or the person whose thought, wisdom or creation was admired in past for example like Mani (who was an inventor of a religion) which did not maintain its followers and thus failed to be in existence. And the people like Volita and Houd who are such kind of writers who are not very much read today. However I am inclined to believe that the book is about the people who where immensely enchanted in history and an the basis of their theory the next generation developed the existing world like the author elaborated it in the perfection that perhaps the influence of these people will go on for the next five hundred years. The basic reason I wanted to read this book was of course because my Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) was ranked at the first place and these word mesmerizes me that he was the only person in the entire history was successful in both religious and secular levels. I assume that their cannot be a better example that can express that his was indeed a true Prophet sent by Allah Almightily Himself. The writer did not allow only prejudice of his person believe blind him from the facts. Even thou I was expecting that somewhere the writer might transcribe anything in unacceptable but it was genuinely flawless. Not just in regard of Holy Prophet (PBUH) but in every chapter the author displayed a very unbiased and positive approach but I don’t think that he wrote in same way for Hitler and I don’t every mind as a matter of my view I believe that Hitler must not have been added in the list of the most influenced people because his impact was rather prosecuting but it was also very true that his lead proved to be very strong over the army that his took hold of. However his praise might be dispraise for some people. Hitler’s impression might be from his lead but what about Lincoln? I was astound to acknowledge that Lincoln did not made it to the list (However the writer did made a short explanation for his reason of not choosing Lincoln in for the list but still it was not a gratifying explanation). He was a man of profound knowledge and made his mark through his skills unlike Washington who was made president because he was extremely wealthy. Apart for abolishing slavery he his influence over the world can know be neglected because believe people wholehearted follow his style but I don’t know what made the writer refuse the importance of such a colossal name. It wont be wrong if I say that it is all because of Lincoln that Obama is a president today. Coming back to the review their are few more things that ought to be enlighten in this review that I feel very much satisfied by the believe of the author that Sciences is prior to Literature (I personally am a writer myself) still I do concur with the notion with he conveyed in the chapter of Shakespeare of I might call him with the correct name that the author illumined in one of his chapter where his ransacked that facts of Shakespeare that their was no such person as Shakespeare but it was rather a pen name adopted by a person who wanted to keep himself a myth. Over and above I rate this book five on five not just because my Prophet (PBUH) was on the first rank (because my Prophet (PBUH) will be number one for me very if he did not placed him on the first place…I don’t need the praise of any non Muslim to comprehend the glory of my Prophet (PBUH) he will always be number one for me) still the ranking is very fair and it is one enlightening book one must read. -Over and Out Rao Umar

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ian Allan

    I love this book. I skimmed through this book back in the mid-80s, when I was in college. But it's been 30 years, and I'm a different person now, so I figured I'd give it a complete start-to-finish read. Very enjoyable. I love the concept. It's not the 100 great people or the 100 most famous -- it's the 100 that have caused the great impact in human history. It's a difficult undertaking, requiring a writer of some skill to pull it off -- must be fluent in the different religions, world history and I love this book. I skimmed through this book back in the mid-80s, when I was in college. But it's been 30 years, and I'm a different person now, so I figured I'd give it a complete start-to-finish read. Very enjoyable. I love the concept. It's not the 100 great people or the 100 most famous -- it's the 100 that have caused the great impact in human history. It's a difficult undertaking, requiring a writer of some skill to pull it off -- must be fluent in the different religions, world history and the sciences. Many of the names are obscure. Of the top 100, 35 are names I wasn't familiar with. Good to learn about them. And with most of the other 65, it's good to get a refresher and learn a little more about them -- he goes about 4 pages per person. There's good reasoning behind the choices. On a lot of the picks, the author often factors in whether the innovation/breakthrough would have soon been made by somebody else if not for the notable person. Book is 30-40 years old, but I don't think that anybody new would make the list. A few would move down and fall off, perhaps. Communism has dipped in popularity. But I don't see any one web or computer pioneer (Jobs? Zuckerberg? Bezos?) who would be quite notable enough on their own to push into the top 100.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Walter Straus

    Interesting to see different people's rankings. No great surprises. I doubt that anyone will read this all the way through, but there are names on the list whom I had not heard of before so it was interesting to read about them. Mohammad was #1!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karoliina Hietala

    I had this book on my kitchen table and I only read it on breakfasts. So... it took me nine months to read this. It's a good book if you want to revise your history knowledge.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    My 5-star rating does not mean that I agree with Hart's ranking. In fact, I specifically don't agree with it. But as much as almost any other book, this one inspired me to learn more about our human story. I found it impossible that, despite making up the great bulk of the human population, there were practically no Asians on the list. I found it suspect that there was one (or two?) woman on the list, and that she was there mostly for inheriting big changes, not actually making many changes. Afr My 5-star rating does not mean that I agree with Hart's ranking. In fact, I specifically don't agree with it. But as much as almost any other book, this one inspired me to learn more about our human story. I found it impossible that, despite making up the great bulk of the human population, there were practically no Asians on the list. I found it suspect that there was one (or two?) woman on the list, and that she was there mostly for inheriting big changes, not actually making many changes. Africans? Non-Christians? Very, very sparse. I felt that the effect of religious figures was overemphasized. I had all kinds of suspicions and inklings of unconscious bias on Hart's part. He included Beethoven for pete's sake! Beethoven? Beethoven had global influence? I can think of white people who would have to guess who he was and wouldn't recognize any of his work, let alone hundreds of millions in Asia whose lives wouldn't be an iota different if Beethoven had never lived. The great thing is that this is exactly the response Michael Hart wanted me to have! How refreshing to have someone put out a book on history and cheerfully say that they hope you disagree, and that you do your own research to come up with your own ideas. This attitude is what makes history an exciting and stimulating conversation, and it's exactly what's snuffed out by the bulk of history books out there. So hooray for Michael Hart! For what it's worth, here's my own work-in-progress 100: 1. Imhotep, 27th century BC Egyptian credited with setting down the principles of architecture, engineering, & medicine 2. Zoroaster, about 18th-10th centuries BC Iranian first known promoter of the idea of good vs. evil 3. En-hedu-ana, 2285BC-2250BC Iraqi first known user of written language 4. Hammurabi, about 1750BC Iraqi first known advocate of written laws 5. Solon, 638BC-558BC Greek first known advocate of electing leaders 6. Mahavira, 599BC-527BC Indian first known advocate of nonviolence 7. Aeschylus, 524BC-455BC Greek first known creator of the artistic idea of tragedy 8. Herodotus, 490BC-430BC Greek first known creator of written history 9. Thucydides, 460BC-395BC Greek first known user of political realism & scientific reporting 10. Laozi, 4th century BC Chinese first known advocate of a love of nature 11. Hippocrates, 460BC-370BC, Greek first known medical educator 12. Epicurus, 341BC-270BC, Greek founder of Epicureanism, which would have a profound impact on all later religious and philosophical ideas in the European tradition 13. Zeno of Citium, 334BC-262BC Greek founder of Stoicism, which would have a profound impact on all later religious and philosophical ideas in the European tradition 14. Ashoka, 304BC-232BC Indian first known advocate of abolishing slavery, first known promoter of arboriculture, & a major influence in spreading Buddhism as a world religion 15. Euclid, 300BC Greek founder of geometry 16. Archimedes, 287BC-212BC Greek inventor of levers, pulleys, & pi 17. Eratosthenes, 276BC-194BC Greek founder of geography 18. Jesus, about 5BC-30CE Israeli founder of Christianity, the first monotheistic, cross-ethnic religion 19. Cai Lun, 50-121 Chinese inventor of paper 20. Al-Kindi, 801-873 Iraqi inventor of Arabic numerals 21. Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi, 936-1013 Spanish first known advocate of modern surgery 22. Avicenna, 980-1037 Iranian first known advocate of modern medicine 23. Madhava of Sangamagrama, 1350-1425 Indian founder of mathematical analysis 24. Christopher Columbus, 1451-1506 Spanish first powerful invader of the Western Hemisphere 25. Nicolaus Copernicus, 1473-1453 Polish leader of the Scientific Revolution 26. Bartolomé de las Casas, 1484-1566 Spanish first known advocate of human rights 27. Francis Bacon, 1561-1626 English first known advocate of the Scientific Method 28. Galileo Galilei, 1564-1642 Italian founder of modern science 29. Baruch Spinoza, 1632-1677 Dutch leader in The Enlightenment and founder of Biblical criticism 30. John Locke, 1632-1704 British first known advocate of political liberalism 31. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, 1632-1723 Dutch founder of microbiology 32. Isaac Newton, 1643-1727 British founder of classical mechanics 33. Antoine Lavoisier, 1743-1749 French founder of modern chemistry 34. Montesquieu, 1689-1755 French first known advocate of a separation of powers 35. Voltaire, 1694-1778 French first widely-read advocate of freedom of religion & freedom of trade 36. Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi, 780-850 Iraqi inventor of decimal numbers & equations 37. Adam Smith, 1723-1790 British first widely-read advocate of capitalism & modern economics 38. Jeremy Bentham, 1748-1832 British first widely-known advocate of separation of church & state and of sexual rights 39. Gregor Mendel, 1822-1884 Czech founder of modern genetics 40. Samuel Morey, 1762-1843 American inventor of the internal combustion engine 41. Michael Faraday, 1791-1867 British inventor of the first viable form of usable electricity 42. Henry David Thoreau, 1817-1862 American first widely-read advocate of civil disobedience 43. Paul Reuter, 1816-1899 German founder of international, organized news reporting 44. Nikolay Bernardos, 1842-1905 Russian inventor of practical arc welding 45. Alexander Graham Bell, 1847-1922 American inventor of the practical telephone 46. George Eastman, 1854-1932 American promoter of mainstream photography 47. Sigmund Freud, 1856-1939 British founder of psychoanalysis 48. Ernest Rutherford, 1871-1937 British founder of nuclear physics 49. Adolf Hitler, 1889-1945 German architect of the Holocaust & advocate of jet aircraft & rocket technology 50. the Wright Brothers, 1871-1948 American inventors of the airplane 51. Ludwig Prandtl, 1875-1953 German founder of aeronautical engineering 52. Albert Einstein, 1879-1955 American founder of modern physics 53. Tim Berners-Lee, born 1955 British inventor of the World Wide Web 54. Leó Szilárd, 1898-1964 American inventor of nuclear reactors 55. Sergey Korolyov, 1907-1966 Russian founder of practical astronautics 56. Min Chueh Chang, 1908-1991 American inventor of birth control 57. Marc Andreessen, born 1971 American inventor of web browsers 58. Francis Crick, 1916-2004 American discoverer of DNA structure 59. Paul the Apostle, 5-67 Israeli promoter of Christianity as a cross-cultural religion 60. Gaetan Dugas, 1953-1984 Canadian carrier of HIV throughout North America 61. Norman Borlaug, 1914-2009 American leader in the Green Revolution 62. Emperor Yang of Sui, 589-618 Chinese first known advocate of examinations for public office 63. Enrico Fermi, 1901-1954 American inventor of nuclear weapons 64. Harry Truman, 1884-1972 American founder of the United Nations 65. Bill Gates, born 1955 American leader of the Personal Computer Revolution 66. Edward Jenner, 1749-1823 British founder of immunology 67. Muhammad, about 570-632 Saudi Arabian founder of Islam 68. Ali, 598-661, Iraqi leader of the split between Shia & Sunni Islam 69. John Edgar Hoover, 1895-1972 first powerful advocate of fingerprint files & police forensic labs 70. Gautama Buddha, about 486BC Indian founder of Buddhism 71. Hiram Stevens Maxim, 1840-1916 British inventor of the portable, fully automatic machine gun 72. Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895 American leader in the abolition of American slavery 73. Mao Zedong, 1893-1976 Chinese leader of China as a world power 74. Sophocles, about 497BC-406BC inventor of character development 75. Valmiki, 5th century BC Nepali collector of the Ramayana, a central document of Hinduism 76. The Yellow Emperor, about 2697BC-2598BC Chinese founder of Chinese civilization (He's not likely to make the final cut since he's probably completely mythological. Imhotep at #1 may be largely legendary as well, at least in regards to his achievements, but he probably did exist as an actual, nameable historical figure. This is more than can be confidently said for Moses, who was included in Hart's list. I'm still up in the air concerning semi-legendary figures. Their achievements are almost certainly overstated, but to not include them seems to discount the massive achievements of pre-literate or partially literate cultures. Because of the flow of history, this will usually coincide with discounting the achievements of non-white people as well. So that's a hard one.) 77. Shih Huang Ti, 259BC-210BC Chinese unifier of China as a national culture 78. George Washington, 1732-1799 founder of the United States, the first known nation without a state religion 79. Justus von Liebig, 1803-1873 German founder of the fertilizer industry 80. Umar, 586-654 Saudi Arabian destroyer of traditional Persian religion, once possibly the most popular religion in the world 81. William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, 1705-1793 leader in the abolition of English slavery 82. Luca Pacioli, 1446-1517 Italian founder of accounting 83. Thomas Edison, 1847-1931 American inventor of the practical light bulb and the motion picture camera 84. Napoléon I, 1769-1821 French promoter of the administrative & judicial foundations of western Europe 85. Karl Benz, 1844-1929 German inventor of the gas-powered automobile 86. Elisha Otis, 1811-1861 American inventor of the safety elevator 87. Alexander Fleming, 1881-1955 British founder of the pharmaceutical industry 88. Swami Vivekananda, 1863-1902 Indian advocate for the revival of Hinduism in modern India 89. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1712-1778 Swiss promoter of many of the central ideas of Romanticism 90. Peter the Great, 1672-1725 Russian leader of Russia as a major European power 91. Themistocles, about 524BC-459BC Greek leader on a path that would eventually lead toward Eurocentric world dominance 92. Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, 865-925 Iranian discoverer of alcohol, kerosene, & sulfuric acid 93. Louis Le Prince, 1842-1890 French inventor of motion pictures 94. George Ludwig, 1922-1973 American inventor of ultrasounds 95. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, 1869-1948 Indian leader in the founding of the Republic of India 96. Shivaji, 1630-1680 Indian first known promoter of guerrilla warfare 97. William Harvey, 1578-1657 British promoter of an understanding of the properties of blood 98. Rachel Carson, 1907-1964 American founder of the global environmental movement 99. Eleanor Roosevelt, 1884-1962 American primary author of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 100. Philo Farnsworth, 1906-1971 American inventor of electronic televisions (Like I said, very much a work in progress still. Among those who maybe more deserve a place than the people listed above are Confucius, Harmodius & Aristogeiton, Plato, Louis Pasteur, Robert Geoffrey Edwards, Johannes Gutenberg, Crawford Long, Igor Sikorsky, Theodore Maiman, Moses, Ruhollah Khomeini, Justinian I, Willard Libby, John Kemp Starley, Karl Marx, Augustine of Hippo, Vladimir Lenin, Jane Goodall, and Alan Guth plus probably many more that I haven't had the time to learn about yet.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Javier

    This is a very well written opinion and I agree with most of it. Guess who number one is? St Paul. Jesus is like 25. A lot of diverse opinions about the book, obviously many people are happy, Mohammed being number one. So I would submit to you that a persons influence be evaluate based on time. For example...I read the book, posted and gave the initial review....this prompted others to read. How many Muslims would not have read the book had I not lead the way? Certainly influence is mostly unidir This is a very well written opinion and I agree with most of it. Guess who number one is? St Paul. Jesus is like 25. A lot of diverse opinions about the book, obviously many people are happy, Mohammed being number one. So I would submit to you that a persons influence be evaluate based on time. For example...I read the book, posted and gave the initial review....this prompted others to read. How many Muslims would not have read the book had I not lead the way? Certainly influence is mostly unidirectional, not bidirectional. So it goes from past to present. Also the amount of influence would have a tendency to decrease as a function of time. Also other inventions hinder or impede influence. The printing press being one of them. Before this is the alphabet...the tool used for making the record. Is influence static or dynamic? Is influence relative or absolute? I believe it is relative....those of you that are reading have extra time on your hands. If you were destitute, taking care of kids, providing food, ill health, poor vision...this would affect your reading. The author had an influence on many people, if he had not written the book...you would not have read it. If it had been written by a Muslim instead of a westerner, what would have been that outcome? Now I would be unable to influence your thinking unless I could write your language, but if you can read mind and you do...than you will be forced into a decision, good or bad. If you thought it was good than you would encourage others to read it. Now in all this please remember that people lie. We dont know if the author put Mohammed first in order to sell more books. Words are put out like bread crumbs to bring in readers. Mark Twain just released his autobiography...100 years after his death. Trust me I want to read the book very badly but I have not had the money to buy it. Anthony and Cleopatra are a good example....everyone believes the story as put out by Shakespeare, and the movie. Even the Egyptians....at least the once I spoke to. But what of the evidence?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heba Attia Mousa

    I had read the arabic translation of this book by Anis Mansour four years ago and I liked it so much .... abart from the ranking issue the book is full of historical information and it makes me able to make a timeline for world's most famous characters ..... I think I'll read the book again in it's original language with the auther's original words

  14. 4 out of 5

    Abdulkarim Alharazi

    l like so much the manner of the writer in dealing wirh specifications that made such a figure in this ranking. although it is not reasonable to put up prophets like Muhammad, Jesus Christ and Moses because they derived their greatness from Almighty. But the author was secular enough to place Prophet Muhammad #1

  15. 5 out of 5

    Myne

    a fantastic book.....

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shareek Ahamed

    This is a very powerful book.... but "Umar ibnu kaththab (Raliyallahu anhu)" deserves the 2nd place. Dear Michael H. Hart you are really an intelligent man.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Adel

    good book , but i disagree with the writer about some of this persons he added , i think he did neglect the role what of old Islamic civilization scientists which the whole west world admit

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bilal Anis

    Great book a must read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jakob

    This book is so much fun. A way of viewing history is through the people who have shaped it - and our modern world - through their inventions, ideas and military might. This book attempts to suss out which people have had the greatest impact on the world, and even to rank them 1 through 100. It's a madman who even attempts to do this, since there are so many ways of looking at history, and of what is deemed influential. There is so much to quibble with in these rankings, but that is part of the This book is so much fun. A way of viewing history is through the people who have shaped it - and our modern world - through their inventions, ideas and military might. This book attempts to suss out which people have had the greatest impact on the world, and even to rank them 1 through 100. It's a madman who even attempts to do this, since there are so many ways of looking at history, and of what is deemed influential. There is so much to quibble with in these rankings, but that is part of the fun, at least for me. There are some maddening omissions , especially since time has moved on since its publication (the inventor of plastic should definitely be on this list, and maybe tim berners-lee, depending on how important you see his role in creating the internet) and some of the reasoning behind who is included on the list isn't that great. Michael Hart argues that art doesn't have that great of an impact on society as a whole, and then goes on to rank Michelangelo at 50, Beethoven at 45, and Shakespeare at 31. Way to stick to your guns Michael! Regarding Shakespeare, he doesn't believe that Shakespeare actually was Shakespeare, but someone else entirely. It's a crackpot theory and it takes away from my overall estimation of the author. Religious figures crowd the top of the list, and with good reason. It is plain to see the enduring influence of the Buddha, Jesus, Mohammed, and some of their lesser known counterparts. The argument for Mohammed at no. 1 is quite convincing: "the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular levels". But I find myself asking whether he hasn't underestimated the influence of Jesus (he ranks him at no. 3) in changing the world's view on morality from an ancient ethics of "might is right" to a modern one where the weak are to be helped and cared for. Arguments like these arise at nearly every point in this book, and its role is best seen as a conversation starter rather than a final authority. Seen as such, this is a fun way of unlocking world history, and it is exhilirating to see some unknown Chinese eunuch ranked right up there with Columbus and Einstein.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kamran Khan

    One can give a favor to himself by reading this wonderful book.Though it is not possible to give a detailed account on 100 personalities in a single book but the writer main focus is the enduring influence these giant figures left on humanity.Ranking criteria depend upon the contributions these personalities rendered for the welfare of the masses.Personalities ranges from every dimension including religious figures , politicians,scientists,philosophers ,literary figures,inventors, pioneers etc.C One can give a favor to himself by reading this wonderful book.Though it is not possible to give a detailed account on 100 personalities in a single book but the writer main focus is the enduring influence these giant figures left on humanity.Ranking criteria depend upon the contributions these personalities rendered for the welfare of the masses.Personalities ranges from every dimension including religious figures , politicians,scientists,philosophers ,literary figures,inventors, pioneers etc.Chapter one is honored with the name of prophet Muhammad pbuh while the last chapter has been associated with Last USST President Gorbav Chauff.Writer has given a specific reason for inclusion of Gorbav Chauff inclusion in this book.He says that when immense economic tormoil encircledUSSR, after the fall of communism then it was this person who came to rescue Russia from further shattering down .He transmuted Russian closed economy into an open one’s.Though he says that some thinkers criticized him for being CIA agent’s planted in Russia.”Peter the Great “ has also been included from Russia giving details how he managed to transform primitive society into a hallmark of tech.Moreover this book reveals startling accounts of British national poet Shakespeare .Michael H .Hart has written about the controversy ,whether ,the poet has ever throng the face of earth or literature associated with him actually belongs to someone else.Controversy turns into more suspense mood when he says that there is no personal record of Shakespeare in British schools where he is said to have been admitted.He says that this literature is actually written by “adward de vari” under the assumed name of Shakespeare.Queen Elizbeth is said to have fostering and patronizing the Shakespearian genius in her court.He gives reasons for this, that’s it was against the Royal dignity to earn money from books publishing .Investigative reporting on Shakespeare ignites the interest of the reader.long story short, it’s worth reading book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenny's Book Life

    Final Remarks for "The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Person in History" by Michael H. Hart **** Four Stars Using 'influence on history' as the yardstick, Michael Hart's book of the 100 most important on that list is a VERY educational read. You don't have to agree with the list or the placements awarded. The list and essays are a great jumping-off point for thought and discussion. This is the type of list that will continue to evolve and change over time. I have quite a personal history wit Final Remarks for "The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Person in History" by Michael H. Hart **** Four Stars Using 'influence on history' as the yardstick, Michael Hart's book of the 100 most important on that list is a VERY educational read. You don't have to agree with the list or the placements awarded. The list and essays are a great jumping-off point for thought and discussion. This is the type of list that will continue to evolve and change over time. I have quite a personal history with this book. I had tried to read all the biographical essays for (seriously) about ten years! I wanted to. But I never got past the first 8 or 10 before I'd be sidetracked and fail to read the whole book again. I've gifted this book a fair number of times and it's always well-received. For 2017 I attacked the book with a reading buddy. I needed the added pressure of someone else reading it with me. Lo and behold, I made it through all 100 and we shared comments about each one, looking up additional info and pictures. I learned about very important historical figures I'd never even heard of. Each of 'The 100' is given a short bio and an explanation of the author's reasons for their place on the list -- scientists, inventors, political figures and rulers, warriors, bad guys, artists, discoverers, and philosophers. This book is a true quality read and I'd recommend it to anybody with an interest in people or history. It's not the type of book you might sit down and read cover-to-cover, but the perfect book to open once a day for 100 days and meet an important influencer from the past. It's well-written and readable as well as fascinating. Loved it. *** 5 Stars = An enduring classic to be read by all; 4 Stars = I LOVE IT! You gotta read it!; 3 Stars = A great book for a specific interest/type of reader/very casual read; 1 or 2 Stars = no comment***

  22. 5 out of 5

    M Jahangir kz

    An excellent book Michael Hart. Anyone who is interested to know about the world most influential personalities across the globe in every walk of life from Religious person to scientist, to great warriors to great conquerer of the worlds, to inventers to successful leaders, to military dictators to great philosophers to great thinkers. Every great influence either it was positive or negative, that influenced the world in every field is mentioned very precisely by the author. I personally likes thi An excellent book Michael Hart. Anyone who is interested to know about the world most influential personalities across the globe in every walk of life from Religious person to scientist, to great warriors to great conquerer of the worlds, to inventers to successful leaders, to military dictators to great philosophers to great thinkers. Every great influence either it was positive or negative, that influenced the world in every field is mentioned very precisely by the author. I personally likes this book this kept me intrigued till the very last 100th personality, it is written in a very good way and the virtue of this book that i like is that it will keep you on your toes and will keep your very interested and thrilled till the very last page, in one person you will reading like about Siddharth The buddha in next one you will be reading about Hitler, in one instance you will be reading about great writers like William Shakespear then the next one you will be pondering on the great Roman empire, the pattern is very good you will read in this book about every great religion of the world, about the greatest military leaders like Alexander the Great to Ghengez khan, including you will get in this book about every great philosophers and writers like Aristotle, Plato, Karl marx , Voltaire, Lenin. Also some others field like great scientific discoeveris like automobile , engine, airplane, radioactivity, the general theory of relatiivity, radio, telephone. Not just this but also great biological and medicine accomplishment like the revolutionary discovery of anthesia during surgeries or medical operation, and the study about smallpox . All in all a very good read. Will give 4.5/5.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe1207

    This is a thought-provoking list if you can ignore the author’s politics outside of the book. The brief bio for each person offers useful context and the explanation of their position ahead or after other candidates is usually well argued. Hart does a wonderful job keeping it conversational, interesting, practical, and objective, even though it might skew in favor of scientists over political and military leaders. I’ve always leaned towards the Great Man Theory of history, but there were a few s This is a thought-provoking list if you can ignore the author’s politics outside of the book. The brief bio for each person offers useful context and the explanation of their position ahead or after other candidates is usually well argued. Hart does a wonderful job keeping it conversational, interesting, practical, and objective, even though it might skew in favor of scientists over political and military leaders. I’ve always leaned towards the Great Man Theory of history, but there were a few selections where Hart argues convincingly for external forces, convenient milieus, whatever-the-opposite-theory-is-called. I flew through these 500+ pages. Some takeaways that made me stare at my feet for upwards of 10 minutes: —Ts’ai Lun at #7, inventor of paper —Augustus at #18 and Julius at #67 —JFK at #81, for the Apollo Space Program. Possible comparisons in the future to Queen Isabella I of Spain and her financial endorsement of Columbus before he discovered the New World. Edward de Vere is not Shakespeare.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chase Parsley

    Overall, this was a fun book to read as well as an enjoyable mental exercise: who are the top 100 most influential people of all-time? I kept thinking that a grading rubric is needed...it isn’t mathematically clear how author Michael Hart arrives at his conclusions, but he backs up what he says. Also, The writing is a bit amateurish (some of Mao’s profile was different than I learned for example), but it is not meant to be a scholarly work and it is acceptable for what it is. Also, Hart discusse Overall, this was a fun book to read as well as an enjoyable mental exercise: who are the top 100 most influential people of all-time? I kept thinking that a grading rubric is needed...it isn’t mathematically clear how author Michael Hart arrives at his conclusions, but he backs up what he says. Also, The writing is a bit amateurish (some of Mao’s profile was different than I learned for example), but it is not meant to be a scholarly work and it is acceptable for what it is. Also, Hart discusses the true identity of Shakespeare. It is interesting but it felt out of place and long. Gorbachev has a long profile too, but I found it more interesting (about the end of the Cold War). Off the top of my head, I would have included Franklin Roosevelt, Da Vinci, Gandhi, Bill Gates, Mussolini, Jeff Bezos, Steve Jobs, and maybe some of the inventors or movies or TV? It is a an endless debate!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Florian Bador

    A good read, especially for those (like me) who don't know much about history. Every person is well summarized in about 4-5 pages so there's no losing ourselves in trivial details. The only cons IMO is that Michael Hart constantly feels the need to justify himself as to why he ranked a certain person higher or lower than another. There's about 1 or 2 paragraphs just about this at every person, and it quickly becomes annoying. It is born from the fear of critics, but I bought a book from the author A good read, especially for those (like me) who don't know much about history. Every person is well summarized in about 4-5 pages so there's no losing ourselves in trivial details. The only cons IMO is that Michael Hart constantly feels the need to justify himself as to why he ranked a certain person higher or lower than another. There's about 1 or 2 paragraphs just about this at every person, and it quickly becomes annoying. It is born from the fear of critics, but I bought a book from the author, not from people who's job is to criticize without ever writing anything. I wish he was a little more confident into his selection and said "F the critics, that's my book".

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lastri Naibaho

    Reading this book can be a shortcut to learn world history. As a "history book", this is interesting because he tells the personal life of the figure and describes their invention and contributions in a general and simple explanation. Although his parameter to make the rank is not objective because his comparison is not an apple to apple. But, well its controversial seems makes this book more interesting for "some people"

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Yafi

    This book, is one of the best books I have ever read. Many great people in this book, first one is my Messenger Mohammed Peace Be Upon Him, صلى الله عليه و سلم. Many great people who did great change in the world.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kamarul Mansur

    It feels like getting to know some, no, 100 of the prominent figures ever lived. If I am not mistaken, there is two of this book which is the first one, Prophet Muhammad pbuh is #1 the most influential (spoiler alert!). The author clearly aren't racist in presenting the order. Great book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    good...nice collection of encyclopedia style biographies...not convinced of rankings and justification of quite a few; claims for moral indifference both repulsive and inaccurate... and the eurocentrism justification is laughable, but still an overall interesting collection

  30. 4 out of 5

    Omar Al Kaaki

    What's interesting about this book is that it gives you an overall review of most influential figures in the history of mankind, and in my opinion, everyone should be aware of the list... The list is very varying as it contains prophets, presidents, scientists, and artists...

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